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80
drank Chai by Teapigs
1193 tasting notes

Scheherazade sent me this one. Chai is not really something I’ve ever been particularly fond of, although I’ve sometimes wondered what I’m missing out. The problem with chai is partly that they invariably contain ginger and cinnamon, neither of which are things I’m fond of in tea, but mostly a rather traumatic introduction to it at around age 10. I will tell you what happened.

As a child, I was a scout for many years. At around age 10 or so, my group got new leaders. These were two guys who were… Well. A bit hippie-y in some ways and very correct in other ways. These two traits came together in a common purpose whenever it was time for giving the children some sort of treat. Like when we were camping or the last meeting before the Christmas holidays or what have you. For a child age 10 or so, this sort of occasion is pretty much synonymous with hot chocolate.

BUT GOSH, NO! Hot chocolate, that’s full of sugar! And fat! Very bad for children! Also very very common and boring, let’s put our own personal Eastern spin on things.

Let’s give the children chai instead, what a good idea!

I think they even had their own spice blend for it. Dear scout leaders that I had at around age 10. No, it was not a good idea. It was in fact a totally rubbish idea. We, the children, drank your strange spicy concoction dutifully because it was that or nothing, but I’m willing to wager a rather large amount today that none of the children even knew what chai was and the vast majority of them would most likely much rather have had hot chocolate.

A couple of years later, when we got new leaders again the concept of chai for these special occasions went the way of the dodo right quickly.

So yes, I will definitely claim to have had a rather fraught and difficult introduction to chai in general.

I have never really warmed up to it, although I’ve tried again several times. Now Scheherazade is providing me with another go. It seems a fairly simple one. It has tea, cinnamon, cardamom, ginger and cassia, which is also some kind of cinnamon-y spice. So not a complicated one, just the base ingredients that I would associate with chai. It strikes me as being a very good starting point, really.

I made it with half milk and half water. I gave the cup of milk about 90 seconds in the microwave, put in the bag and filled up with boiling water. The milk makes it difficult for me to see when I think it’s done steeping, though. I’m not at all used to milk in tea, but I have learned this much in my adventures with chai; milk is essential.

It smells very nice indeed, actually! All cinnamon-y sweet, but not soapy and nostril-assaulting like cinnamon can sometimes be. Cinnamon sugar and rice porridge cooked with milk. This cup smells pretty much like Christmas.

It tastes quite mild and milky. Possibly I should have used more water and less milk? I plopped the bag back in while drinking though, to see if I could get it to be a bit stronger. I can’t pick up anything in the way of a base here at all, which I’m rather missing. This doesn’t really feel like I’m drinking tea at all. It’s more like warm milk with spices, which in itself is actually also quite nice, but not really what I was hoping for.

The spices are tempered by the milk and not even the ginger is bothering me in this. Ginger is usually my downfall because I don’t much care for the burning sensation. This is a chai that I could actually drink because it’s so mild and unassuming. A true chai fan might find it a bit dull though.

Courtney

I’m working on chai too, but specifically coconut chais to try and avoid milk hah.

xhado123

You were a scout as well? What rank did you achieve?

Angrboda

We don’t do ranks in Denmark. All the children are equal, but divided up in patrols. Teams, really, but we call them patrols. We were perhaps 25 children, divided into four patrols with five or six children in each. The closest you come to rank as such would be the patrol leader and the patrol assistant. The leader’s job is largely to be the spokesperson for the patrol, like during role-call for example, the leader will say how many members are present and who is missing, and the assistant steps in if the leader isn’t there. Most of the time, for meetings, there would be some activities for all the children or to be done in teams (patrols). Older children have meetings mostly only with their own patrol and decide their own activities and then the whole group only once a month.

Angrboda

I was a member for about ten years or so, I think.

xhado123

We used the patrol method as well. It was core to Baden Powell’s ideals for scouting. I felt the ranking system developed incentive to improve, but I know such things are not for everyone. 25 is a healthy troop size, mine hovered around 12-20. It’s nice to belong to an organization that allows me to connect with people around the world. Well met.

xhado123

I should also state that I am from the US.

Angrboda

25 was an estimate, though. Children are divided up according to age, so the number was variable. I think on average that was about how many we were.

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Comments

Courtney

I’m working on chai too, but specifically coconut chais to try and avoid milk hah.

xhado123

You were a scout as well? What rank did you achieve?

Angrboda

We don’t do ranks in Denmark. All the children are equal, but divided up in patrols. Teams, really, but we call them patrols. We were perhaps 25 children, divided into four patrols with five or six children in each. The closest you come to rank as such would be the patrol leader and the patrol assistant. The leader’s job is largely to be the spokesperson for the patrol, like during role-call for example, the leader will say how many members are present and who is missing, and the assistant steps in if the leader isn’t there. Most of the time, for meetings, there would be some activities for all the children or to be done in teams (patrols). Older children have meetings mostly only with their own patrol and decide their own activities and then the whole group only once a month.

Angrboda

I was a member for about ten years or so, I think.

xhado123

We used the patrol method as well. It was core to Baden Powell’s ideals for scouting. I felt the ranking system developed incentive to improve, but I know such things are not for everyone. 25 is a healthy troop size, mine hovered around 12-20. It’s nice to belong to an organization that allows me to connect with people around the world. Well met.

xhado123

I should also state that I am from the US.

Angrboda

25 was an estimate, though. Children are divided up according to age, so the number was variable. I think on average that was about how many we were.

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Bio

Ang lives with Husband and two kitties, Charm and Luna, in a house not too far from Århus. Apart from drinking tea, she enjoys baking, especially biscuits, reading and jigsaw puzzles. She has recently acquired an interest in cross-stitch and started a rather large project. It remains to be seen whether she has actually bitten off more than she can chew…

Ang prefers black teas and the darker sorts of oolongs. She has to be in the mood for green and white, and she enjoys, but knows little to nothing about, pu-erh.

Her preferences with black teas are the Chinese ones, particularly from Fujian, but also Keemun and just about anything smoky. She occasionally enjoys Yunnans but they’re not favourites. She has taken some time to research Ceylon teas, complete with reference map, and has recently developed some interest in teas from Africa.

She is sceptical about Indian blacks as she generally finds them too astringent and too easy to get wrong. She doesn’t really care for Darjeelings at all. Very high-grown teas are often not favoured.

She likes flavoured teas as well, particularly fruit flavoured ones, but also had an obsession with finding the Perfect Vanilla Flavoured Black and can happily report that this reclusive beast has been spotted in a local teashop near where she works. Any and all vanilla flavoured teas are still highly attractive to her, though. Also nuts and caramel or toffee. Not so much chocolate. It’s a texture thing.

However, she thinks Earl Grey is generally kind of boring. Cinnamon and ginger are also not really a hit, and she’s not very fond of chais. Evil hibiscus is evil. Even in small amounts, and yes, Ang can usually detect hibiscus, mostly by way of the metallic flavour of blood it has.

Ang is not super impressed with rooibos or honeybush on their own. She doesn’t care for either, really, but when they are flavoured, they go usually go down a treat.

Ang used to have a Standard Panel of teas that she tried to always have on hand. She put a lot of thought into defining it and decided what should go on it. It was a great idea on paper, but in practise has been discovered to not really work as well.

Ang tries her best to make a post on Steepster several times a week. She tends to write her posts in advance in a word doc (The Queue) and posting from there. This, she feels, helps her to maintain regularity and stops her from making five posts in three days and then going three weeks without posting anything at all.

Angrboda is almost always open to swapping. Just ask her. Due to the nature of the queue, however, and the fact that it’s some 24 pages long at the moment, it may take a good while from she receives your parcel and until she actually posts about it.

The Formalities

Contact Angrboda by email: [email protected]
Contact Ang on IM on Google chat

Find Ang on…
Steam: Iarnvidia (Or Angrboda. She changed her display name and now is not certain which one to search for. She uses the same picture though, so she is easily recognised)
Goodreads: Angrboda
Livejournal: See website.
Dreamwidth: Ask her

Bio last updated February 2014

Location

Denmark

Website

http://angrboda.livejournal.com

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