10
drank Ginger Ale Bai Mu Dan by 52teas
1298 tasting notes

Oh dear. I don’t like ginger… It has even been decided long ago that I probably shouldn’t even bother trying ginger ale. There have been a few teas in the box that I didn’t much like, but this is the first one where I’ve thought from the start that I didn’t think I would like it. I’ve been sceptical of some others, yes, but haven’t expected something outright unpleasant. But here we go, then. In for a penny, in for a pound and all that.

It smells ginger-y, but also sweeter than I had expected. Not as stabby on the nose. I suspect that’s the white tea shining through.

Okay, not more procrastinating. Here we go.

Yes, it’s ginger-y and not really very pleasant for me, but it could have been a lot worse. Just like with the aroma, it feels a bit mellowed out by the white tea. Or the ale-y bit, I don’t know.

Still though. Ginger. I’ll just stop here, I think, because ginger. Sorry. It’s just… Ginger.

Kashyap

you would have hated what I did to cider last night….i jug cider, 5 freshly cut ginger ‘coins’, 1pint blueberries, and 2 stems rosemary….yummy on a cold day…but not your speed if you don’t like ginger… :)

Angrboda

Leave out the ginger, and it would have been a lot more interesting to me. :) Rosemary strikes me as the odd one out there, though.

Kashyap

rosemary in apple cider is awesome…and so is the addition of seasonal cranberries

Angrboda

Do you serve it warm or cold? I have heard that some people take it hot, but that idea is foreign to me. It’s largely a summer-y drink here.

cteresa

I do not hate ginger (not fresh ginger at least) but this also did not quite work for me.

Kashyap

cider is usually a autumn beverage, mulled with spices…..I personally have never been a great fan…then a number of years ago I was reading a cook book from a Buddhist temple and they suggested :
take 1/2 gal of favorite cider, bring to a simmer, drop 1 6" peice of fresh rosemary, take off heat, cover, and steep for 4-6 minutes. I usually cover the top of the liquid with fresh in-season cranberries (which once covered will pop and rupture transforming it into a crimson brew). You then remove the rosemary and serve warm/hot.

Angrboda

How different! In Denmark it’s usually served chilled and straight. I’ll have to try your method one of these days. Only, you know, without the ginger. :)

Uniquity

I love cider…warm, I prefer it to be spiced (I sometimes pop some chai in mine) but cold I just like it as is. Apply juice-y. : )

Kashyap

an often overlooked fact: the difference between apple juice and cider is merely filtration….so cold cider would seem to me like basically unfiltered apple juice….of which, I’m not a fan….but thank you for sharing your insight…I would love to visit Denmark….nordic climates suit me :)

Uniquity

I have wondered what the difference would be…I was thinking perhaps additives/sweeteners, but it’s always hard to compare local fresh cider to canned apple juice. : )

cteresa

I feel really bitchy (sorry) to point this out, but I think the difference between cider and apple juice is the same as the difference between wine and grape juice – fermentation transforming sugar molecules into alcohol molecules. Filtration does eventually come into it, but it needs to ferment first. Just like grape juice needs to ferment to became wine (though tea fermentation is, I believe a different chemical process and should be called oxidation instead). You can not filter apple juice into cider, though juice might naturally ferment, specially if fresh. I am just mentioning this in case it saves anybody some disappointment in case they were going to try it, nevermind me otherwise.

Angrboda

Yes, the definition in Denmark is definitely what Cteresa says. Cider has a (small) alcohol content. Juice does not.

Does that mean, though, that above recipe should be made with cider or juice? I’m thinking with cider the alcohol would all just bubble away anyway.

Kashyap

while this is true…it is important to note…traditional apple cider is a seasonally consumed beverage as it is non-filtered and this allows for a natural fermentation to take place as well as a natural development of carbination…however, modern pasturization often kills this process and renders it alchohol free and so technically it is considered cider if it is non-filtered (in the US) and unsweetened. Apple juice is sweetened and filtered and pasturized/homogenized. The recipe can use either tradional apple cider (fermented and unfiltered) or modern (unfiltered/pasturized/non-fermented). Its the active pulp and natural bacteria in unfiltered ‘cider’ that allows for the fermentation to take place. Modern food sanitation is really such a messed up thing.

cteresa

Might be a regional thing – I do not think you can sell “cider” in the EU which has no alcohol contents, I had never heard of non alcoholic-cider before. Though there is actually something “champagne” for kids which is bubbly apple juice without alcohol, but I do not think they can call it cider.

Uniquity

For a Canadian perspective, there is hard cider (alcoholic) and also “regular” cider which is available at grocery stores and markets, alcohol free.

ashmanra

Same in America, at least where I live. hard cider has alcohol, cider does not. I love a good, fresh cider, cold or hot.

DaisyChubb

Yes ^ Hard cider is delish! And cider of the non alcoholic variety is more often that not enjoyed hot and mulled with spices (in my home anyways), and I go for the hard cider cold in the summer. yum.

cteresa

Round these parts (mediterranean to baltic, atlantic to black sea, I guess) cider has got to be “hard” to be cider o, that is alcoholic (or somebody would feel cheated!). Chocolate has got to have a minimum ammount of cocoa solids. Water bottlers are not allowed to put on packaging that it is “diet water”. A bunch of stuff has to be from a certain location and follow some rules to be called something, It is a little bit contro-freak-ish, but I got to confess I like it. I am used to it.

Angrboda

What Cteresa said. It’s the same here. If you try to sell something as ‘cider’ and it doesn’t have a small alcohol content, it’s false advertising and illegal. In the same way it’s SO illegal to sell something as juice if it contains alcohol. It’s all in the name of quality control and consumer trust and whatnot.

Uniquity

It’s interesting to me that cider is solely a term for an alcoholic drinking EU. All alcohol has it’s percentage listed in Canada but there are a couple of products (cider, lemonade) that have both alcoholic and non-alcoholic varieties.

cteresa

I think if you ever mentioned the possibility of non alcoholic cider in some parts of Europe (Brittany, or any side of the Basque country) you might get murdered (or at least totally snubbed and ignore and maybe somebody would spit on your food behind your back). If the Eu allowed that, chances are the French and Spanish would rise in revolt.

(but seriously, proper labelling of foodstuffs and protected origins, like Champagne or Port or Parma Ham, are really important things in EU legislation)

cteresa

and just to add, we do take alcohol very seriously on this continent :p

Angrboda

Not to mention feta cheese.

and just to add, we do take alcohol very seriously on this continent :p

Which is why it’s not cider if it’s not alcoholic. There must be no doubt as to whether something is alcoholic or not. You can’t sell Bacardi Breezers as ‘soda’ either no matter how fizzy, fruity and synthetic it is.

DaisyChubb

It’s totally just a difference of terms in Canada, not an improper labeling issue. haha just wanted to throw that in there :)

ashmanra

Same here. Cider is cider and hard cider is hard cider, not to be confused with moonshine, of course. ;)

CHAroma

This is the funniest thread ever! I concur that in America, cider is non-alcoholic. Alcoholic cider does exist as “hard cider.” But cider by itself, not so much. Also, I’ve found that cider is almost always served hot. I’m not sure of the fermentation process or whatnot, but I think of it as cider is hot, spiced, apple juice.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

Comments

Kashyap

you would have hated what I did to cider last night….i jug cider, 5 freshly cut ginger ‘coins’, 1pint blueberries, and 2 stems rosemary….yummy on a cold day…but not your speed if you don’t like ginger… :)

Angrboda

Leave out the ginger, and it would have been a lot more interesting to me. :) Rosemary strikes me as the odd one out there, though.

Kashyap

rosemary in apple cider is awesome…and so is the addition of seasonal cranberries

Angrboda

Do you serve it warm or cold? I have heard that some people take it hot, but that idea is foreign to me. It’s largely a summer-y drink here.

cteresa

I do not hate ginger (not fresh ginger at least) but this also did not quite work for me.

Kashyap

cider is usually a autumn beverage, mulled with spices…..I personally have never been a great fan…then a number of years ago I was reading a cook book from a Buddhist temple and they suggested :
take 1/2 gal of favorite cider, bring to a simmer, drop 1 6" peice of fresh rosemary, take off heat, cover, and steep for 4-6 minutes. I usually cover the top of the liquid with fresh in-season cranberries (which once covered will pop and rupture transforming it into a crimson brew). You then remove the rosemary and serve warm/hot.

Angrboda

How different! In Denmark it’s usually served chilled and straight. I’ll have to try your method one of these days. Only, you know, without the ginger. :)

Uniquity

I love cider…warm, I prefer it to be spiced (I sometimes pop some chai in mine) but cold I just like it as is. Apply juice-y. : )

Kashyap

an often overlooked fact: the difference between apple juice and cider is merely filtration….so cold cider would seem to me like basically unfiltered apple juice….of which, I’m not a fan….but thank you for sharing your insight…I would love to visit Denmark….nordic climates suit me :)

Uniquity

I have wondered what the difference would be…I was thinking perhaps additives/sweeteners, but it’s always hard to compare local fresh cider to canned apple juice. : )

cteresa

I feel really bitchy (sorry) to point this out, but I think the difference between cider and apple juice is the same as the difference between wine and grape juice – fermentation transforming sugar molecules into alcohol molecules. Filtration does eventually come into it, but it needs to ferment first. Just like grape juice needs to ferment to became wine (though tea fermentation is, I believe a different chemical process and should be called oxidation instead). You can not filter apple juice into cider, though juice might naturally ferment, specially if fresh. I am just mentioning this in case it saves anybody some disappointment in case they were going to try it, nevermind me otherwise.

Angrboda

Yes, the definition in Denmark is definitely what Cteresa says. Cider has a (small) alcohol content. Juice does not.

Does that mean, though, that above recipe should be made with cider or juice? I’m thinking with cider the alcohol would all just bubble away anyway.

Kashyap

while this is true…it is important to note…traditional apple cider is a seasonally consumed beverage as it is non-filtered and this allows for a natural fermentation to take place as well as a natural development of carbination…however, modern pasturization often kills this process and renders it alchohol free and so technically it is considered cider if it is non-filtered (in the US) and unsweetened. Apple juice is sweetened and filtered and pasturized/homogenized. The recipe can use either tradional apple cider (fermented and unfiltered) or modern (unfiltered/pasturized/non-fermented). Its the active pulp and natural bacteria in unfiltered ‘cider’ that allows for the fermentation to take place. Modern food sanitation is really such a messed up thing.

cteresa

Might be a regional thing – I do not think you can sell “cider” in the EU which has no alcohol contents, I had never heard of non alcoholic-cider before. Though there is actually something “champagne” for kids which is bubbly apple juice without alcohol, but I do not think they can call it cider.

Uniquity

For a Canadian perspective, there is hard cider (alcoholic) and also “regular” cider which is available at grocery stores and markets, alcohol free.

ashmanra

Same in America, at least where I live. hard cider has alcohol, cider does not. I love a good, fresh cider, cold or hot.

DaisyChubb

Yes ^ Hard cider is delish! And cider of the non alcoholic variety is more often that not enjoyed hot and mulled with spices (in my home anyways), and I go for the hard cider cold in the summer. yum.

cteresa

Round these parts (mediterranean to baltic, atlantic to black sea, I guess) cider has got to be “hard” to be cider o, that is alcoholic (or somebody would feel cheated!). Chocolate has got to have a minimum ammount of cocoa solids. Water bottlers are not allowed to put on packaging that it is “diet water”. A bunch of stuff has to be from a certain location and follow some rules to be called something, It is a little bit contro-freak-ish, but I got to confess I like it. I am used to it.

Angrboda

What Cteresa said. It’s the same here. If you try to sell something as ‘cider’ and it doesn’t have a small alcohol content, it’s false advertising and illegal. In the same way it’s SO illegal to sell something as juice if it contains alcohol. It’s all in the name of quality control and consumer trust and whatnot.

Uniquity

It’s interesting to me that cider is solely a term for an alcoholic drinking EU. All alcohol has it’s percentage listed in Canada but there are a couple of products (cider, lemonade) that have both alcoholic and non-alcoholic varieties.

cteresa

I think if you ever mentioned the possibility of non alcoholic cider in some parts of Europe (Brittany, or any side of the Basque country) you might get murdered (or at least totally snubbed and ignore and maybe somebody would spit on your food behind your back). If the Eu allowed that, chances are the French and Spanish would rise in revolt.

(but seriously, proper labelling of foodstuffs and protected origins, like Champagne or Port or Parma Ham, are really important things in EU legislation)

cteresa

and just to add, we do take alcohol very seriously on this continent :p

Angrboda

Not to mention feta cheese.

and just to add, we do take alcohol very seriously on this continent :p

Which is why it’s not cider if it’s not alcoholic. There must be no doubt as to whether something is alcoholic or not. You can’t sell Bacardi Breezers as ‘soda’ either no matter how fizzy, fruity and synthetic it is.

DaisyChubb

It’s totally just a difference of terms in Canada, not an improper labeling issue. haha just wanted to throw that in there :)

ashmanra

Same here. Cider is cider and hard cider is hard cider, not to be confused with moonshine, of course. ;)

CHAroma

This is the funniest thread ever! I concur that in America, cider is non-alcoholic. Alcoholic cider does exist as “hard cider.” But cider by itself, not so much. Also, I’ve found that cider is almost always served hot. I’m not sure of the fermentation process or whatnot, but I think of it as cider is hot, spiced, apple juice.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

Profile

Bio

Ang lives with Husband and two kitties, Charm and Luna, in a house not too far from Århus. Apart from drinking tea, she enjoys baking, especially biscuits, reading and jigsaw puzzles. She has recently acquired an interest in cross-stitch and started a rather large project. It remains to be seen whether she has actually bitten off more than she can chew…

Ang prefers black teas and the darker sorts of oolongs. She has to be in the mood for green and white, and she enjoys, but knows little to nothing about, pu-erh.

Her preferences with black teas are the Chinese ones, particularly from Fujian, but also Keemun and just about anything smoky. She occasionally enjoys Yunnans but they’re not favourites. She has taken some time to research Ceylon teas, complete with reference map, and has recently developed some interest in teas from Africa.

She is sceptical about Indian blacks as she generally finds them too astringent and too easy to get wrong. She doesn’t really care for Darjeelings at all. Very high-grown teas are often not favoured.

She likes flavoured teas as well, particularly fruit flavoured ones, but also had an obsession with finding the Perfect Vanilla Flavoured Black and can happily report that this reclusive beast has been spotted in a local teashop near where she works. Any and all vanilla flavoured teas are still highly attractive to her, though. Also nuts and caramel or toffee. Not so much chocolate. It’s a texture thing.

However, she thinks Earl Grey is generally kind of boring. Cinnamon and ginger are also not really a hit, and she’s not very fond of chais. Evil hibiscus is evil. Even in small amounts, and yes, Ang can usually detect hibiscus, mostly by way of the metallic flavour of blood it has.

Ang is not super impressed with rooibos or honeybush on their own. She doesn’t care for either, really, but when they are flavoured, they go usually go down a treat.

Ang used to have a Standard Panel of teas that she tried to always have on hand. She put a lot of thought into defining it and decided what should go on it. It was a great idea on paper, but in practise has been discovered to not really work as well.

Ang tries her best to make a post on Steepster several times a week. She tends to write her posts in advance in a word doc (The Queue) and posting from there. This, she feels, helps her to maintain regularity and stops her from making five posts in three days and then going three weeks without posting anything at all.

Angrboda is almost always open to swapping. Just ask her. Due to the nature of the queue, however, and the fact that it’s some 24 pages long at the moment, it may take a good while from she receives your parcel and until she actually posts about it.

The Formalities

Contact Angrboda by email: [email protected]
Contact Ang on IM on Google chat

Find Ang on…
Steam: Iarnvidia (Or Angrboda. She changed her display name and now is not certain which one to search for. She uses the same picture though, so she is easily recognised)
Goodreads: Angrboda
Livejournal: See website.
Dreamwidth: Ask her

Bio last updated February 2014

Location

Denmark

Website

http://angrboda.livejournal.com

Following These People

Moderator Tools

Mark as Spammer