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100
drank Apple Sencha by Den's Tea
865 tasting notes

I can’t believe the brewing perameters on this! The info they sent me clearly states 1/2TB (1.5tsp) steeped in 4oz boiling water for 1min for senchas, but the bag says 1tsp/6oz in 190 degree water for 3 min. I’m sticking w/ the sheet.

Preparation
Boiling 1 min, 0 sec
Cofftea

2nd and 3rd infusions combined. 8oz boiling water steeped for 3min. In light of the bitterness of the 1st infusion. I did something I RARELY do. I decided to sweeten it. 1 packet of stevia. Idea isn’t bad, but too sweet. next time gonna steep it in 16oz for 7 min 40 sec. You could just use half a packet, but to me that’s a pain and a mess.

teaplz

Japanese greens have very specific steeping parameters. Each green from company to company can be radically different. I’ve heard of greens that require 2 tbsp.

Cofftea

@teaplz, it shouldn’t be the company that makes the difference. Each sencha SHOULD be the same. Are other teas (black, chai, pu erh, white, oolong) from Japan similar? What about from other countries? This is the 1st I’ve learned of steeping according to sub type of tea (sencha vs. just green) and can’t find this info for other kinds.

teaplz

No, each sencha is not the same. Like every other tea, sencha has many varieties. Depending on which sencha you’re drinking, steepage might be different.

In fact, in general, there are two broad categories of sencha: “Two types of sencha are available. They’re differentiated by the length of steaming time: there are lightly-steamed (regular) senchas and deep-steamed senchas. Generally speaking, teas from the select growing zones and higher-grade teas (such as the first-harvest teas discussed below) are processed with shorter steaming times to retain their natural flavor. Deep-steaming is a relatively new processing method. Advantages brought by longer steaming are a milder yet rich-bodied taste with less bitterness, brilliant green brewed color, and easier brewing.”
http://www.greentea-direct.com/about_hishidai/sencha_gyokuro.html

So yes, you have to change your steepage time for each different tea depending on varietal.

teaplz

Further information on the difference senchas: http://www.amazing-green-tea.com/sencha.html

Not all teas are the same.

Cofftea

@teaplz, I think there was some miscommunication on my part. What I meant was that all premium sencha should be steeped in an amount of 1.5tsp of leaf in 2-3oz of 160 degree water for 90 sec no matter what company it comes from. Same w/ sencha, Premium Fukamushi-Sencha, and Fukamushi-Sencha with their own unique parameters.

teaplz

What I was trying to say is that different companies can order different types of sencha, and suggest different steeping times as a result. That’s why each company can have very varied steeping suggestions. It’s all to taste, anyway. Different amounts of buds vs. leaves, different varieties of plants, different roasting procedures, all of these can change suggested steep times.

If every company’s premium sencha tasted exactly the same, then why would anyone bother drinking several different companies’ varieties? It’s because no two teas are ever alike, and no one’s taste buds are ever alike.

I don’t think that tea can ever be an exact science. One man’s “BLECH!” is another man’s “MMM.”

Cofftea

Although I’ve gotten in trouble for saying so, I definitely agree "One man’s “BLECH!” is another man’s “MMM.”", but I also think that while different teas of like type (premium sencha for example) should be steeped using the same parameters to amplify the differences. Just my way of thinking of course. It just doesn’t make sense for them to include that pamphlet and then suggest alternative steeping perameters.

Cofftea

I get confused easily lol. And contradictory info DEFINTELY confuses me:)

teaplz

Hrm. One might be Japanese-style and the other might be Western-style steeping? That’s what it looks like to me!

Cofftea

@teaplz, that’s exactly what I think it is- but I don’t think a company should publish both (especially w/o specifying the difference). It confuses my poor tea-logged brain cells. Don’t get me started on Western style steeping LOL. I’ll stick w/ Japanese style steeping. It never occured to me that the way we drink it here could be different than in their countries of origin. Now that I do, I’m going to strive to steep each type of tea authentically.

Cofftea

4th & 5th infusions combined. 8oz of water steeped for 5 min. Not a whole lot of apple flavor, but definitely a sweet green tea. Dumping the leaves out cuz most of them are so small they’re getting mushy- does anyone else have that problem w/ Den’s Tea?

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Cofftea

2nd and 3rd infusions combined. 8oz boiling water steeped for 3min. In light of the bitterness of the 1st infusion. I did something I RARELY do. I decided to sweeten it. 1 packet of stevia. Idea isn’t bad, but too sweet. next time gonna steep it in 16oz for 7 min 40 sec. You could just use half a packet, but to me that’s a pain and a mess.

teaplz

Japanese greens have very specific steeping parameters. Each green from company to company can be radically different. I’ve heard of greens that require 2 tbsp.

Cofftea

@teaplz, it shouldn’t be the company that makes the difference. Each sencha SHOULD be the same. Are other teas (black, chai, pu erh, white, oolong) from Japan similar? What about from other countries? This is the 1st I’ve learned of steeping according to sub type of tea (sencha vs. just green) and can’t find this info for other kinds.

teaplz

No, each sencha is not the same. Like every other tea, sencha has many varieties. Depending on which sencha you’re drinking, steepage might be different.

In fact, in general, there are two broad categories of sencha: “Two types of sencha are available. They’re differentiated by the length of steaming time: there are lightly-steamed (regular) senchas and deep-steamed senchas. Generally speaking, teas from the select growing zones and higher-grade teas (such as the first-harvest teas discussed below) are processed with shorter steaming times to retain their natural flavor. Deep-steaming is a relatively new processing method. Advantages brought by longer steaming are a milder yet rich-bodied taste with less bitterness, brilliant green brewed color, and easier brewing.”
http://www.greentea-direct.com/about_hishidai/sencha_gyokuro.html

So yes, you have to change your steepage time for each different tea depending on varietal.

teaplz

Further information on the difference senchas: http://www.amazing-green-tea.com/sencha.html

Not all teas are the same.

Cofftea

@teaplz, I think there was some miscommunication on my part. What I meant was that all premium sencha should be steeped in an amount of 1.5tsp of leaf in 2-3oz of 160 degree water for 90 sec no matter what company it comes from. Same w/ sencha, Premium Fukamushi-Sencha, and Fukamushi-Sencha with their own unique parameters.

teaplz

What I was trying to say is that different companies can order different types of sencha, and suggest different steeping times as a result. That’s why each company can have very varied steeping suggestions. It’s all to taste, anyway. Different amounts of buds vs. leaves, different varieties of plants, different roasting procedures, all of these can change suggested steep times.

If every company’s premium sencha tasted exactly the same, then why would anyone bother drinking several different companies’ varieties? It’s because no two teas are ever alike, and no one’s taste buds are ever alike.

I don’t think that tea can ever be an exact science. One man’s “BLECH!” is another man’s “MMM.”

Cofftea

Although I’ve gotten in trouble for saying so, I definitely agree "One man’s “BLECH!” is another man’s “MMM.”", but I also think that while different teas of like type (premium sencha for example) should be steeped using the same parameters to amplify the differences. Just my way of thinking of course. It just doesn’t make sense for them to include that pamphlet and then suggest alternative steeping perameters.

Cofftea

I get confused easily lol. And contradictory info DEFINTELY confuses me:)

teaplz

Hrm. One might be Japanese-style and the other might be Western-style steeping? That’s what it looks like to me!

Cofftea

@teaplz, that’s exactly what I think it is- but I don’t think a company should publish both (especially w/o specifying the difference). It confuses my poor tea-logged brain cells. Don’t get me started on Western style steeping LOL. I’ll stick w/ Japanese style steeping. It never occured to me that the way we drink it here could be different than in their countries of origin. Now that I do, I’m going to strive to steep each type of tea authentically.

Cofftea

4th & 5th infusions combined. 8oz of water steeped for 5 min. Not a whole lot of apple flavor, but definitely a sweet green tea. Dumping the leaves out cuz most of them are so small they’re getting mushy- does anyone else have that problem w/ Den’s Tea?

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Are you a company or tea blender on sites like Adagio that would you like your tea reviewed? If so, please e-mail me @ [email protected].

What I most enjoy from obtaining samples from companies to review is that it helps me to better learn to drink and review teas from a more objective perspective, meaning more of the “This tea is…” point of view rather than the “I like/don’t like” this tea. I feel objectivism in tea reviews is EXTREMELY important because no two tea drinkers tastes are exactly the same. I’ve also been extremely surprised by several teas. I love recieving a sample I think I will be only writing an objective review on, only to completely fall in love with it upon tasting it.

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Tea tastes:
I will ALWAYS pick loose leaf over tea bags. I only drink bagged tea if that’s my only choice or I find a flavor that I can’t find a loose leaf version for. When I do drink bagged; however, I always weigh my bag and am constantly curious as to the weight/flavor ratio- sometimes I am quite surprised by the flavor punch of light bags.

I have a preference for organic and fair trade teas (preferably both), but would never pass up an amzing tea just because it isn’t organic and/or fair trade.

I love savory teas.

I’m currently searching for a chai flavored soy powder or a soy based chai mix (either already mixed or a recipe).

I hardly EVER sweeten my teas. I feel that sweeteners (unless flavored like tea honeys, brown sugar, ice cream topping syrups, flavored coffee syrups, etc) do not add anything to the flavor profile of tea- in fact, I’ve found that they dumb down the flavors.

I NEVER serve my tea over regular iced cubes- I always make tea cubes.

I LOVE cooking w/ tea and making smoothTEAS.

I LOVE tea blending.

I rarely drink herbal teas unless they are mixed with true teas. My favorite herbals to mix with true teas are: spearmint, peppermint, lemongrass, rose hips, and gingeroot.

I can’t stand anything w/ fennel or anise. Hot black teas (except orange pekoe bagged tea that you get when you go out to eat and chai teas) tend to upset my stomach.

I drink matcha daily and love flavoring it. I’m also in a constant search of preflavored matchas.

I’m constantly searching for information on how to prepare tea authentically according to its country of origin.

My Tasting Notes Ratings (edited 8/8/10)
1: I can’t even stand the raw leaf enough to make this (I’ve never owned a tea w/ this rating, but I’ve smelled some before buying resulting in me NOT buying them that were that bad)

2: I steeped this tea but couldn’t stand the aroma enough to get it past my nose

3: I immediately gagged at the 1st sip and spit it out.

4: I manageed to get the 1st sip down, but I tossed the rest.

5: I drank the 1st cup but I can’t bring myself to resteep

6: Made it thru the entire set of infusions but I can’t bring myself to tinker w/ the parameters and won’t be making it again.

7-10: Does not taste anything like the ingredients or name suggests (i.e. Adagio’s Sour apple)

11-25: I can taste some of the ingredients, but the flavor is severely lacking

25-49: Teas that I would not consider bad in their flavor profile, but certainly below average

50: Average.

51-69: Teas above averge, but I wouldn’t go as far as calling them “good”.

70-75: Very good, but still room for improvement

76-85: Above average flavor profile

86-90: REALLY good flavors

91-99: Almost PERFECTLY achieves the goal of the ingredients and name of the tea.

100: Abosolutely perfect teas!

Other Interests: GOD! and all things pertaining to Him and His children, my dog Madison, travelling, and coffee.

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