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85

I’ve had this tea for practically a month and have been a bit intimidated by it. I also didn’t really quite know that “corn” was a flavor I wanted in tea. It sounded a bit gimicky, perhaps.

I was mistaken. This tea is both accessible to a beginner’s palate and not at all overpowered by corn flavor. I brewed it in ye olde basic gaiwan after just a quick de-dusting rinse. The liquor is dark. Purple almost. I was nearly worried I brewed it improperly, but since it tastes delightful, I have to say that I can’t have gone too wrong. This first brew, I’ll admit, gives off an aroma of corn quite heavily. But the flavor is milder – rounded and sweeter, with that wonderful, airy, tingling finish described above as mint. The second steeping is even better, with more “tea” notes, balanced out corn husk, and smooth smooth mint.

I am so glad I dove in and tried this. What a nice tea – not outright flavored, but still a bit novel. It’s easy not to overthink it and just enjoy, which is not as easy with other pu erh teas with their lofty names and histories. Everyone should try this, though I might save the rest until summer… the mint tingle has a refreshing quality about it!

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 45 sec
Nathaniel Gruber

Great Review! I think the coolest part of this tea is that it picks up its flavor from the corn that is grown in between the rows of tea plants…those are used as a natural windbreak and organic fertilizer. I love the way tea picks up the flavors of what you put in the soil and grow around it.

I’ve had some tieguanyin in which the plot of land has pine trees used as a windbreak and it comes through in the tea. Very cool stuff!

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Nathaniel Gruber

Great Review! I think the coolest part of this tea is that it picks up its flavor from the corn that is grown in between the rows of tea plants…those are used as a natural windbreak and organic fertilizer. I love the way tea picks up the flavors of what you put in the soil and grow around it.

I’ve had some tieguanyin in which the plot of land has pine trees used as a windbreak and it comes through in the tea. Very cool stuff!

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Stay at home mom to twin toddlers. Programming geek. Knitter. Reveling in the small luxuries.

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Seattle, WA

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