Hide

Welcome to Steepster, an online tea community.

Write a tea journal, see what others are drinking and get recommendations from people you trust. or Learn More

92

Thanks to Auggy who sent me the most gorgeously packaged teas ever, I am now sipping this tea. What a magnificent Lapsang! This tea exemplifies all the reasons I love the Lapsang Souchong in particular and smoky teas in general. I am not surprised by the wide range of ratings.

Certainly the aroma is absolutely indicative of a smoky tea. The aroma and the taste got me to thinking of Russian literature. I know that this is not labelled a caravan—but I thought of Boris Pasternak. One of the first literary controversies I was aware of was his Nobel Prize, gratefully accepted and then rejected, probably because of pressure from the Soviets. So I started reading his poetry and then I read his sweeping epic, “Dr. Zhivago” (the book is better than the film, which I haven’t seen for 40 something years).

This tea tastes like Yuri and Lara huddled up in a small cottage with the fire aflame. As Yuri Zhivago ventriloquizes Boris Pasternak, he reflects on winter:

“It snowed and snowed ,the whole world over,
Snow swept the world from end to end.
A candle burned on the table;
A candle burned.”

This tea reminds me of the insistent beat and flame and flare and flicker of the candle burning on the table as the fire roars in the fireplace and the Samovar boils away.

Golden Moon has at this point my vote for Best. Lapsang. Souchong. Ever. I know I’ll drink more—for me the land o’ Lapsang is largely an undiscovered and yet to be mapped country—but I’m placing an order.

I know that this review is more evocative than specific but for what do we live but to be evoked into sensations, emotions, nostalgias, memories and tea, like poetry and music, is a wonderful vehicle. This Golden Moon Lapsang Souchong (spasibo, Auggy), has taken me back to late 19th and early 20th century Russia.

SoccerMom

Okay I have not had a Lapsang Souchong so I’m wondering do you typically use milk and sugar? I got in my Golden Moon Sampler today and would like to try the Lapsang Souchong but need to be properly prepared. :)

__Morgana__

I’d try it first without additives. It’s a pretty unique flavor, and worth experiencing on its own before changing it up. I think it’s a love it or hate it thing, though. I liked what I’ve tried quite a bit, but it’s pretty intense and not something I’d do every day. Basically, I smelled smoke for two days after drinking it. I think it gets in your pores. ;-)

Doulton

I always try a tea without any milk or sugar for the first several sips. Then I will (sometimes) experiment mid cup with adding a splash of milk (I use whole milk for this purpose) and some brown sugar little cubelets—not full sized ones, but little crystals.

I do like to add milk and sugar to the Lapsang Souchongs. I don’t add any to green teas or white teas. The more bracing and robust the tea, the more likely I am to default to a milk and/or sugar addition.

SoccerMom

I chickened out this morning and picked the GM Irish Breakfast instead. I’m working my way up as I don’t want to “smell smoke for two days after drinking it.” :) Thanks for your advice.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

Comments

SoccerMom

Okay I have not had a Lapsang Souchong so I’m wondering do you typically use milk and sugar? I got in my Golden Moon Sampler today and would like to try the Lapsang Souchong but need to be properly prepared. :)

__Morgana__

I’d try it first without additives. It’s a pretty unique flavor, and worth experiencing on its own before changing it up. I think it’s a love it or hate it thing, though. I liked what I’ve tried quite a bit, but it’s pretty intense and not something I’d do every day. Basically, I smelled smoke for two days after drinking it. I think it gets in your pores. ;-)

Doulton

I always try a tea without any milk or sugar for the first several sips. Then I will (sometimes) experiment mid cup with adding a splash of milk (I use whole milk for this purpose) and some brown sugar little cubelets—not full sized ones, but little crystals.

I do like to add milk and sugar to the Lapsang Souchongs. I don’t add any to green teas or white teas. The more bracing and robust the tea, the more likely I am to default to a milk and/or sugar addition.

SoccerMom

I chickened out this morning and picked the GM Irish Breakfast instead. I’m working my way up as I don’t want to “smell smoke for two days after drinking it.” :) Thanks for your advice.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

Profile

Bio

I really love big, bold, brash teas. Smokiness enthralls me. I don’t seem to do subtle.
I don’t do rooibos.

My rating system:
0-30:
Never again in a hundred million years

31-55: This tea probably has some redeeming qualities but I won’t would not seek it out again.

56-70:
Shows some promise but also has a fundamental flaw. I probably owe these a second taste but am unmotivated.

71-80:
Good with at least one strong quality; I probably would not buy it but would drink it cheerfully.

81-90: Worthy contenders; they might be ranked 100 on somebody’s else’s scale. I like them a lot but have not fallen in love. Will probably buy and use.

91-95: These are the true loves, the chosen ones, the ones I dream about and crave. Unless they are in a limited edition—la! how you tease me!—I will always keep in my cupboard.

96-100: I cannot be separated from these teas and would develop a panic attack if I were to run out.

-

“She is too fond of books and it has turned her brain.”

Elderly dowager. Quintessential cat lady.

Tea which must be in stock always:

Black Dragon LS by Upton Teas: My choice every morning.

Florence & Lapsang Souchong by Harney & Sons

a good Gen Maicha

Samovar: Russian Blend, Maiden’s Ecstasy, Ryokucha

Mariage Frères: Confucious, Vivaldi, Eros, Aida, Marco Polo

American Tea Room: Brioche

Leland Teas: Bogart

Life in Teacup:
An Xi Tie Guan Yin Grade II modern green style & also Charcoal Style

Location

In the midst of the middle of the heart of nowhere in particular.

Following These People