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95
drank Raspberry Oolong by A C Perch's
1112 tasting notes

Another Traveling Tea Box Tea!

It is a dreary rainy day here, and I thought something berrylicious would perk me up :) Time to try the Raspberry Oolong! I was delighted to see raspberry pieces in the tea – and is that a blueberry too!?!?!?

1st steep – I decided to be conservative (for once in my life!) and try 5 minutes instead of 8, and use 190 deg water and not boiling. Gorgeous fragrance of tea and berries! It was VERY hard to wait for this to steep because it smelled so good. OOoooh I get to pour now!!! sip sip sip WOW! This is SO DELICIOUS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! A really great sweet/tart thing going on, but mostly sweet, and 100% natural tasting. The oolong is a winner – no bitterness. I love it!!!

2nd steep, 6 min: Very similar to the first! Still getting luscious berries and the wonderful tea taste. A+++++

I am soooo thrilled that I got to try this, AND that I have just about another teaspoon for another pot! I am going to save it for another dreary day so that I can have a bright spot.

(I love the Traveling Tea Box!!!!!!)

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 5 min, 0 sec
Angrboda

I’m not sure about the blueberry… I know which ones you’re thinking of, I just thought they looked more like black currant. Now I’m not sure what I think they are. It’s been a while since I ran out.

This one is taking the world by storm, it seems. I wonder if AC Perch’s will send me some more for free if I point them at the rave reviews they’re getting. ;)
Huge favourite of mine.

JacquelineM

I googled black currant for images and that IS what it looks like!!!! I learned something new (and delicious!) today! I will seek other black currant things out :) This is probably why I didn’t know what it was (from wikipedia):

Blackcurrants were once popular in the United States as well, but became rare in the 20th century after currant farming was banned in the early 1900s when blackcurrants, as a vector of white pine blister rust, were considered a threat to the U.S. logging industry.3 The federal ban on growing currants was shifted to jurisdiction of individual states in 1966, and was lifted in New York State in 2003 through the efforts of horticulturist Greg Quinn. As a result, currant growing is making a comeback in New York, Vermont, Connecticut and Oregon.45 However, several statewide bans still exist including Maine6, Massachusetts[citation needed] and New Hampshire.7

Since the American federal ban ceased currant production nationally for nearly a century, the fruit remains largely unknown in the United States and has yet to regain its previous popularity to levels enjoyed in Europe or New Zealand. Owing to its unique flavor and richness in polyphenols, dietary fiber and essential nutrients, awareness and popularity of blackcurrant is once again growing, with a number of consumer products entering the market.

Fascinating!!!

Angrboda

Interesting. :) It’s a relatively common garden bush/tree here. We had a great big one in the garden where I grew up, and my mother used to make jam if there were enough berries. Sometimes insects got them first. It’s difficult to find a ‘wild’ blueberry spot here on the other hand.

Ricky

You stole the rest of it! Haha, great tea =P

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Comments

Angrboda

I’m not sure about the blueberry… I know which ones you’re thinking of, I just thought they looked more like black currant. Now I’m not sure what I think they are. It’s been a while since I ran out.

This one is taking the world by storm, it seems. I wonder if AC Perch’s will send me some more for free if I point them at the rave reviews they’re getting. ;)
Huge favourite of mine.

JacquelineM

I googled black currant for images and that IS what it looks like!!!! I learned something new (and delicious!) today! I will seek other black currant things out :) This is probably why I didn’t know what it was (from wikipedia):

Blackcurrants were once popular in the United States as well, but became rare in the 20th century after currant farming was banned in the early 1900s when blackcurrants, as a vector of white pine blister rust, were considered a threat to the U.S. logging industry.3 The federal ban on growing currants was shifted to jurisdiction of individual states in 1966, and was lifted in New York State in 2003 through the efforts of horticulturist Greg Quinn. As a result, currant growing is making a comeback in New York, Vermont, Connecticut and Oregon.45 However, several statewide bans still exist including Maine6, Massachusetts[citation needed] and New Hampshire.7

Since the American federal ban ceased currant production nationally for nearly a century, the fruit remains largely unknown in the United States and has yet to regain its previous popularity to levels enjoyed in Europe or New Zealand. Owing to its unique flavor and richness in polyphenols, dietary fiber and essential nutrients, awareness and popularity of blackcurrant is once again growing, with a number of consumer products entering the market.

Fascinating!!!

Angrboda

Interesting. :) It’s a relatively common garden bush/tree here. We had a great big one in the garden where I grew up, and my mother used to make jam if there were enough berries. Sometimes insects got them first. It’s difficult to find a ‘wild’ blueberry spot here on the other hand.

Ricky

You stole the rest of it! Haha, great tea =P

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Bio

I love to cook, bake, read, paint, knit, do needlework, and garden. I need my coffee, but I LOVE my tea. I work at an Art School, and attend a large public university doing post-bac work (my BA is in English). I’m interested in the liminal spaces between art and craft, the academic and the practical, the individual and community, and the old and the new. I’m currently exploring these ideas through the disciplines of education, literature, history, and psychology.

I enjoy writing tasting notes, but have decided not to numerically rate teas as of 9/14/10. For an explanation, see my looooong tasting note about Mountain Malt from the Simple Leaf.

My favorites:
Chinese black teas
A good “milk and sugar” English style black
Earl Grey (classic, and in all variations!)
Vanilla teas (classic, and in all variations!)
Jasmine, Rose, Violet and other froofy, flowery teas!
An Occasional Oolong
Flavored Rooibos
Herbal Tisanes

Location

Collingswood, NJ

Website

http://jackiemania.wordpress....

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