78

The tea looks quite similar to the Ti Kwan Yin I got from the same company, although these leaves are rolled up a bit smaller. The dry leaves of both also have a sort of spinachy scent to them, although I think the Tung Ting’s is a bit lighter (it’s hard to compare, I just sent away the last of my Ti Kwan Yin so I’m going by memory and my old tasting notes).

The first steep (1 min) is really only enough to get the leaves wet and to encourage them to unfurl. So the resulting liquid is quite thin and light; floral in flavour with a hint of sweet bakeyness on the end.

With the 2nd steep (2 mins) we get into the real deal. The tea starts off delicately floral, and then a warm, fruity flavour takes over, finished off by very light bakey notes. The aftertaste is somewhat floral too, I think.

I think I’ll go for third steep after this. :)

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

People who liked this

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

Profile

Bio

I’m a university student in her twenties who’s currently working her way toward a Bachelor of Natural Resource Science degree. I love both science and science-fiction and I’m a history nut on top of that. Maybe I should just call myself a nerd and leave it there. ;)

I’ve been drinking tea since I was young but it’s only in the past couple years that I’ve become interested in the good-quality stuff.

I’m also a self-proclaimed Grammar-Nazi, and improper capitalization and spelling invariably makes me twitch (yes, I mean you!)

Location

British-Columbia, Canada

Following These People