1355 Tasting Notes

70

Once steeped the resulting tea bares a strong cinnamon scent with a touch of clove.

The first few sips reveal a cinnamon and black tea base with a touch of orange in the after taste. It’s not as strong as expected though that isn’t always a bad thing. Slight bitterness but mostly it’s a cinnamon and black tea with a touch of dryness. Perhaps the fruit helps to keep it light?

While the cinnamon is strong with this one I do wish the orange was stronger. I can’t taste any almond, apple or vanilla and would not have even guessed they were in the blend by taste alone.

Despite that it’s cinnamon and that is very Christmasy so who am I to complain?

https://kittylovestea.com/2016/12/12/bluebird-tea-co-advent-calendar-of-tea-day-12/

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88

The resulting tea bares a sweet toasted Rooibos scent with spicy ginger and cinnamon undertones. It sort of does resemble a ginger biscuit (and those are my favourite!).

A few sips and I’m unsure what to write about first. While I can taste the sweetness from the Rooibos it’s also warming and fiery from the ginger. It’s almost deceiving at first, just as you think ‘Oohh it’s just another sweet Rooibos blend’ it grabs hold of you and intensifies in the back of the throat. All of this while mellowing into a ginger biscuit after taste with a hint of cardamom and cinnamon.Power and complexity is certain and this is not a blend for the faint-hearted.

As it cools slightly the sweetness relaxes and the spices come forward a little more. The balance of ginger, cardamom and cinnamon make it exotic and chai aromatic but the unmistakable ginger biscuit likeness lingers in my mind.

https://kittylovestea.com/2016/12/01/bluebird-tea-co-advent-calendar-of-tea-day-1/

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75

Once steeped the tea took on a deep brown colour (before milk was added) and it bares a rich, sweet malt scent.

First few sips reveal a dark, dry, malt and wood base with a soft hint of smoke. Slightly bitter and stronger than I initially expected.

The strength continues to impress on a British standard though I would like a little more flavour and depth in it. Though It’s easy to drink and warming on this cold eve.

https://kittylovestea.com/2016/12/02/bluebird-tea-co-advent-calendar-of-tea-day-2/

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80

I haven’t actually tried any Matcha from Bluebird Tea so I am excited to finally cross that box. I also like the little tin, I plan on re-using it to make a Matcha lipgloss for it in the near future. I may even do a tutorial for it.

Bluebird describe this tea as “Highest quality Japanese matcha powder shaded two weeks prior to harvest. “

The Matcha is a beautiful bright green colour and quite fine in powder. It produced a beautiful foam.

Flavour is light and smooth with sweet grass and soft vegetal notes that linger in the after taste. This is very easy to drink, it slips down with ease. Perhaps one of the smoothest Matcha I have tried, though I found it perhaps too easy for my every day needs. A little more flavour would have been preferential for me but still it was a nice Matcha. Also a note to say the foam was great, the last few Matcha samples I had from other companies didn’t whisk too well but this foamed beautifully.

Given that it was a higher quality than I expected I may try a few others from them. They do a few flavours that sound interesting.

https://kittylovestea.com/2016/12/04/bluebird-tea-co-advent-calendar-of-tea-day-4/

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61

Once steeped it bares a mint and chamomile scent with no licorice to speak of.

The first few sip reveal a sweet and refreshing peppermint flavour that fills my mouth and softens into a mild (and I stress mild) yet very refreshing licorice flavour. In fact there is more refreshing factor of the licorice than actual licorice flavour. Like when someone walks down the hall and you didn’t see them but you can smell their perfume lingering near by. It’s actually a sigh of relief for me that it’s not too licorice thick or heavy, more of an after taste.

It sort of tastes like I’m chewing gum and sipping chamomile tea. I can’t say if that is good or bad really, just unusual, but that is what it reminds me of.

As it cools the mint becomes a little stronger and the refreshing aftertaste slightly weaker, or well at least my mouth has adapted for it so it’s not as noticeable. So really after a while it’s a creamy peppermint with a slight herbal finish. Now it’s minty enough to be like candy cane.

I could finish this cup but I don’t think this blend is for me. It was nicer than I expected being only mild on the licorice side but it was refreshing enough to be a little off putting. Again I stress that’s because I hate licorice. If you happen to love chamomile, peppermint and licorice then this is probably something you should look up.

https://kittylovestea.com/2016/12/07/bluebird-tea-co-advent-calendar-of-tea-day-7/

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83

Bluebird state that this is just pure peppermint leaves, though it is not up for sale on the website at the moment.

It’s a simple ‘herbal tisane’ but I’m a fan of peppermint so I don’t mind. It’s actually very good for the digestive system and stomach upsets. If I’m feeling unwell I usually go straight to the mint tea.

Flavour is strong and sweet with pure peppermint flavour. It’s very refreshing, reminds me of candy cane. It’s delicious! Pure tasting and natural, plus it wasn’t too dry and herbal so it’s rather fresh. The refreshing peppermint lingers in the after taste.

When you sip it’s slightly dry and herbal but then straight away the peppermint grows, the sweetness increases and the refreshing tone packs a flavour punch that fills the mouth.

https://kittylovestea.com/2016/12/09/bluebird-tea-co-advent-calendar-of-tea-day-9/

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65

Once steeped the tea (technically tisane) bares a red colour and super sweet strawberry scent.

The first few sips reveal a sweet strawberry but thick Rooibos base which lingers in the after taste. Slightly creamy but overall the sweetness has a big impact, almost verging on being too sweet. I’m a savoury person over sweet so it’s not something I could have all the time, it’s bordering on that too sweet line.

The Rooibos base is thickly herbal too and slightly dry which is slightly disappointing since I usually dislike Rooibos in sweetness and herbal flavour.

As it cools which is also about half way down the mug it remains sweet but the Rooibos herbiness goes away slightly behind the strawberry sweetness.

I suppose it is jelly like but not creamy enough for ice cream; though perhaps it is if milk was added. Though It’s a nice enough blend I don’t think it’s for me.

https://kittylovestea.com/2016/12/10/bluebird-tea-co-advent-calendar-of-tea-day-10/

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87

Konnichi wa ocha no yūjin!

Or if that made no sense:

Hello tea friends!

Japan is a country that inspires me to the point of being in awe. The culture, the technology, the religions, their traditions, and especially their tea. I thought I had experienced everything a few years ago that had to do with tea, until I went into the world of Japanese tea. There is nothing like it! If you have never tried Japanese tea for yourself then I highly recommend trying it. Part of this reason is because Japanese tea contains umami which is the fifth taste which translates to ‘pleasant savoury taste’. It may sound strange for a tea to taste savoury but I tend to liken it to a soup broth, completely unique and bursting with flavours. This is why I am so taken with Japanese tea in general.

I am happy and excited to be drinking some First Flush Midori Shincha by NaturaliTea as sold by Yunomi. No idea what Midori or Shincha is? Let me break it down: Midori means green and Shincha translates to ‘new tea’ which refers to when it was picked. Basically a Shincha is the first harvest of Sencha leaves which is also known as Ichibancha ‘ the first picked tea’. Besides the fresh aroma of the young leaves, Shincha is characterised by its relatively low content of bitter catechin and caffeine, and relatively high content of amino acid. This makes the Shincha harvested limited in size of the batch and also the time it is picked. And to finish off for Japanese tea newbies Sencha is a ryokucha or green tea cultivar that is indigenous to Japan, so much so that Sencha is Japans most commonly consumed tea with Sencha production being 80% of all tea produced in Japan.

Now it’s time for the tea itself. Opening the sample pack reveals bright, glossy green leaf shards that are loosely broken. They bare a gorgeous sweet grass and mineral scent.

Steeping a Japanese tea is rather different than steeping a general green tea, the water temperature and steeping length can either enhance the umami or bypass it. A lot of it comes down to experimentation and preference; I like a nice umami which often comes through in low temperature water and short steeps. So I will be trying to find the umami goodness. Another thing you often find is the change of temperature, an example being the first steep at 80C, the second at 40 C and third at 70C. Again that would be because it enhances the umami quality.

My Steeping Parameters: 200ml Yunomi (Japanese cup), 360ml Futanashi Tokoname (lidless teapot used to enhance freshness and scent), 10g loose leaf.

I want another note: my teapot is larger than my yunomi but I will only be using my teapot to 200ml. Also this is a sizeable yunomi that needed to be adjusted for. Otherwise I would recommend 3g of leaf to 60ml water.

Also, Yunomi bared this note: Our recommend steeping method is to use water cooled to about 40˚C/105˚F steeped for 2-3 minutes for the best balance between sweetness and umami (savory) flavors.

For that reason my first steep will be 2 minutes at 40C. (Room temperature is usually around 20C).

Once steeped the resulting tea liquid is cloudy, golden yellow colour that bares a vegetable (broccoli) and sweet grass scent. Not dissimilar to it’s raw state.

The first sips reveals a strong, broth like flavour packed with sweet grass, spinach, kale and mixed flowers with a pleasant, bitter aftertaste that lightens and becomes sweeter. That was the first sip, as you can see it packs a lot of different flavours and information in it. The after taste is lingering for very long in my mouth. I say broth because it reminds me of a strong, hearty, soup broth full of green vegetables.

The umami is very strong, so much so that I feel like I’ve jumped into an ice cold bath with every punching sip I take. But I can’t stop myself from sipping. The umami washes over me with warmth and wide eyed energy. A few sips more lighten the tea while my tongue adjusts to this unique flavour. It detects sweet honey and salty seaweed notes among the ever growing broth blend.

Second Steep – 80C for 45 seconds (see the jump in temperature?)

So the shorter steep at hotter temperature is mostly because I want to test the body of the green tea. Umami comes out in the first steep but it gets weaker over time, that is why I Umami the first steep and green tea the rest of it.

Yes, the umami is less than half of what it was. The punch that it packed is now a shadow of it’s former self; that being said it’s still a strong steep. It still has strong sweet grass and vegetal tones, and it’s also a little bitter; but it is lacking as much depth and oomph as the first steep. This is a good example of how much water temperature and steeping time can change a Japanese tea.

The sweetness is less so it’s not honeyed in this steep but it is hay like and grassy. In terms of broth this is mid level, like the vegetables are in a pan with water and steeping for a while, enough to have flavoured the water, but there is still more flavour left to go.

Third Steep – 60C for 30 seconds (another temperature change)

Why the change? I want a lower temperature to increase any remaining umami that is left, whilst lessening the steeping time a little to try and reduce the bitterness. This is another example of why I said it’s best to experiment with Japanese teas, it’s all down to personal preference. Some people will read this and think I had it too strong or perhaps don’t agree with my parameters at all. I didn’t plan on the times for my second or third steep but I read what I wanted from the tea and it’s potential.

Was it a good decision to change? Yes. This steep is very light in taste but some umami can be found admidst the sweet, bitterness. This cup is more raw cabbage like than broccoli. It bares the same mineral, green sort of taste. While it’s immensely weaker in strength I feel if it was warmer it would have been too bitter to appreciate the remaining umami. As such just before the bitterness kicks in and the powerful sweetness I can taste the broth.

Final Thoughts

This was a nice Shincha that packed an incredible umami punch. Sweet yet savoury, vegetal yet bitter, it was a delicious combination in one tea. I would recommend it to umami lovers or those looking to experience it for the first time. If you are then stick with short steeps and 70-80C temp until you find it at your desired level. Don’t be put off if you dislike it the first time around, it may take time to get it to your personal taste. And once you do it will grow on you! Plus not forgetting that this is Organic I can tell the clarity of the flavours once prepared. There is nothing in this tea that tastes chemical or unnatural.

If you haven’t experienced many Japanese teas before then I hope I have given you insight.

Until next time, Happy Steeping!

http://www.yunomi.life/products/naturalitea-01-handpicked-midori-first-flush?variant=18231417861

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Hello Tea Friends!

Today I will be reviewing some Dian Hong Cha from Teabook. If you are new to tea then here is some translating: Dian – Shorter version of Yunnan, a province in China known for tea growing. Hong means red which refers to it’s colour, in China it’s known as red tea but in Western countries it’s a black tea. Cha literally means tea. So it’s Yunnan Red Tea. This tea is also known as Yunnan Black or Yunnan Red but as there are many different types of black/red teas produced in Yunnan it can be a little confusing using the generic naming. This is why Dian Hong is most commonly used for differentiation.

Personally I do love a nice Dian Hong, they tend to have more tippy golden buds in general, assuming it’s of a nice quality. For this I have no idea until I open it, so let’s get to it. Actually first before I rip the top off the sachet like a monkey peeling a banana let me mention the sachet itself, Teabook sell these sachets in pre weighed bags to make it easier for drinking and transportation. Each sachet is 3g.

Opening the packet I can see some thin, dark leaves with a couple of golden tips. Altogether 3g is around 10 pieces of loosely broken leaves. They bare a dry, wooden scent with some sweetness. I say 3g but the sachet weight is included in that too.

Steeping this Western style: 2-3g into a 320ml glass cup with infuser for 3 minutes boiling water. Usually I do three steeps with Dian Hong in a teapot but 3g is not enough for me to do that to my desired strength.

Once steeped the tea is golden red in colour and bares a very mild malt and wood scent.

Flavour is very mild at first, further sips reveal a hint of sweet malt. There is some drying in the after taste that coats my tongue somewhat. The strength does not increase but the sweet, honeyed malt remains. It’s only noticeable really toward the after taste.

I am torn at this point. I do not want to write a negative review but I do need to be honest. While there was nothing wrong with the tea I personally (and I stress personally) believe that 2g loose leaf tea is not enough for a cup. If I had some Dian Hong whilst relaxing at home I would use 4-5g for a Western brew and 6-7 for a gaiwan. Both would be suitable for multiple steeps at that level of strength.

So the sachet idea is good but it should be at least 5g of tea in my honest opinion. That way it could be Western steeped or used in Gaiwan/Gong Fu Teapot and would be happy in both instances. Perhaps 2g is good for new tea drinkers adjusting to the taste of loose leaf, though even then I would recommend a higher dose.

Apologies to Teabook but that is my brutally honest opinion.

Until next time,

Happy Steeping!

http://sororiteasisters.com/2016/09/29/dian-hong-black-tea-teabook/

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78

A tea re-visit. Whilst preparing some tea tonight I found myself stuck with what tea to have. This was one of the front teas in my cupboard so I thought I would refresh my memory of it. Reading my previous SororiTea Sisters review I mentioned it was too light. So this time I am gaiwan steeping it.

Original try – 200ml gongfu teapot with 3 nuggets.
Today – 100ml gaiwan with 4 nuggets.

From what I remember there was little difference between the two sessions. The cream was at the front with wood and earth tones behind a soft sweetness. All very smooth and easy to drink. Not something you could over steep by taste. It’s inoffensive yet the creaminess makes it desirable.

My husband rarely drinks tea outside of a standard tea bag (much to my dislike) but even his average pallet mentioned tasting cream. Not to put him down but I think coffee has ruined most of his taste, he usually tastes very little in things.

I will have to keep this on stand by as it’s one of the only Shu I can bring myself to drink these days.

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Bio

I’m 28 years old from Leicester, England named Kayleigh. I have a wonderful husband called Richard whom I am very lucky to have in my life.

I started off many years ago drinking herbal and fruit teas which over time peaked my interest in trying new types. Eventually I began to import and sample many different teas and cultures which I still do today. My life goal is to try as many teas and ways of having tea as possible.

Tea wise my cravings change constantly from pu erh one month to jasmine green to the next and so on.

I adore cats and have four of my own called Cassie, Mr Sooty Pants,Ivory and Ollie.

I also have two fish tanks which thankfully my cats have no interest in. They house an array of tropical fish and shrimp.

I am a proud vegetarian and have been for the majority of my life. When I say vegetarian I mean just that as well, no fish or seafood, no chicken now and again, no animal products such as gelatine and cochineal.

I also enjoy watching Japanese Anime and horror films.

I am always up for tea swaps so if you see anything in my virtual cupboard then please contact me.

A short list to help swapping with me easier though honestly I am not fussy and am willing to try anything. Plus the notes below are usually, sometimes I love a tea that has an ingredient I tend to dislike and other times I hate a tea that I thought I would love.

Likes: Any fruit but especially melon and orange, vanilla, all tea types (black, green, white etc), nuts (any), flowers, ginger, chai.

Dislikes: Licorice, aniseed, clove, eucalyptus, lavender.

My rating system
I have my own way of rating teas that makes each one personal. I have different categories, I rate each tea depending on what it is made of. For example: I rate green teas in a different way to black teas or herbal teas. So black, white, green, Pu Erh, Rooibos, Oolong, blends and tisanes all have their own rating system. That way I can compare them with other teas of the same or similar type before for an adequate rating. And when I do give top marks which is very rare I am actually saying that I would love to drink that tea all day, every day if possible. It’s a tea that I would never turn down or not be in the mood for. So while I agree that no tea is 100% perfect (as nothing is) I am saying that it’s as close as it comes to it. After all, in my book the perfect teas (or close to perfect anyway) are ones that I could drink all the time. That is why you will find a high quality black or Oolong will not have as high a score as a cheap flavoured blend, they are simply not being compared in the same category.

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