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I have tried several times to like this tea because my mother pawned off a giant box of it on me a few months ago. Haven’t been successful yet. I think it will become a cooking tea. It moves from tasteless and dull to bitter and overpowering in a flash.

Spoonvonstup

How would you use a tea like this in cooking? I’ve thought of trying tea in place of water for broth starters or rice or noodles, and I know some folks use Lapsang Souchong to add smokiness to dishes. What do you normally do?

Londo Mollari

To be perfectly honest I haven’t used bagged green tea for anything but roasting with other herbs inside fish or chicken or adding flavor to udon or chicken broth – yet! I love udon though and make it quite a bit, and it’s a nice little touch in my chicken noodle soup. My plan was just to do that, but also to TRY and add a touch to shortbread cookies.

In theory at least it just means melting butter with the tea leaves in it, let it set at least half an hour to steep, then strain the leaves back out. It won’t have that great green color and taste that you’d get with full matcha baking though. – It was more an experiment just to use it up and see if the flavor came through at all. What I really want to do when I get a free evening is similar to this though: http://justonecookbook.com/blog/recipes/green-tea-white-chocolate-cookies/ Not sure if making tea cookies from this tea will make any difference at all, but I do know that matcha makes food beautiful. :)

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Spoonvonstup

How would you use a tea like this in cooking? I’ve thought of trying tea in place of water for broth starters or rice or noodles, and I know some folks use Lapsang Souchong to add smokiness to dishes. What do you normally do?

Londo Mollari

To be perfectly honest I haven’t used bagged green tea for anything but roasting with other herbs inside fish or chicken or adding flavor to udon or chicken broth – yet! I love udon though and make it quite a bit, and it’s a nice little touch in my chicken noodle soup. My plan was just to do that, but also to TRY and add a touch to shortbread cookies.

In theory at least it just means melting butter with the tea leaves in it, let it set at least half an hour to steep, then strain the leaves back out. It won’t have that great green color and taste that you’d get with full matcha baking though. – It was more an experiment just to use it up and see if the flavor came through at all. What I really want to do when I get a free evening is similar to this though: http://justonecookbook.com/blog/recipes/green-tea-white-chocolate-cookies/ Not sure if making tea cookies from this tea will make any difference at all, but I do know that matcha makes food beautiful. :)

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Hello, as you may have guessed, I am not really Londo Mollari. Apologies for the deception. I am Melissa.

In addition to my teas, I am a bit of a foodie, have an undying love for red wine and am lucky enough to have all the restaurants of DC and several VA wineries within a lazy reach of home. I have an ever-expanding orchid obsession and I have been known to talk to them. It helps.

To be honest, Tea went from being an interest to a bit of an obsession fairly recently for me – since I quit smoking. Tasting things is amazing, who knew?! Though a nice cuppa now replaces a much worse addiction, I spend FAR more money on this than I ever did on cigarettes.

I have loved tea ever since I was small, probably too small, visiting on the farm in Nebraska and drinking all my grandmother’s sun tea. I still prefer now what I liked then, watching tea slowly stain eddies of water, tasting nature.

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