Made for me at DavidsTea — not sure of the measurement, mayb 1.5 tsp for their hot cup (350mL?)

While picking up a new-to-me herbal and some blends I cannot get at my local indie tea store (what can I say? I steep around), I tried a cup of Assam Banaspaty. The hot water at DavidsTea is too damn hot for oolong, green or white, which baffles me, but it’s just grand for rooibos and black. With their $1 straight tea promo, and the hail and wet snow falling this morning, an Assam sounded good.

This is a compeltely acceptable Assam, with all the good Assam characteristics. It finishes sweet and a bit mineral and tastes pleasantly malty. It lacks, however, a good body and heft. It’s hardly a weak tea, and it seems to pack the caffeine, but Assam from the Gingia and Kopili estates seem to have aheavier body. (Damn Fine’s Captain Assam is in a class, or ship, by itself.) It’s a good Assam, no bitterness after a six-minute steep, no faults, but no real ‘wow’ factor, either.

Rating:78.

Wayne

If the staff is trained well, they’ll actually add some cold water to the hot water before adding the tea. Pretty sure they did something like that for my oolong, since it wasn’t even too hot to drink when I got it.

Michelle Butler Hallett

The cold water addition is all well and good, but DavidsTea makes a big deal of water temp (rightly) on the tea labels, so why don’t they have at least two different water temps on the go, one for black and herbal, and a slightly cooler one for oolong, green and white? Scalded leaves are not going to entice anyone to the joys of oolong, white and green, unless all that extra flavouring hides the bitterness of scalded leaves. Personally, I’d be annoyed to see anyone (making tea for me) dunk tea into water rather than pour water onto tea. I’m still sore over the wrecked cup of vanilla oolong from a few weeks ago.

I just hit a new low in tea-dorkdom with this comment.

Wayne

I find it difficult when talking to friends and colleagues about tea not to go into a downward spiral of tea-dorkdom, and I often find myself rambling and asking myself “wait, do they really care..?” :P

And I know what you mean about the “dunking” – it just seems wrong, somehow.

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Wayne

If the staff is trained well, they’ll actually add some cold water to the hot water before adding the tea. Pretty sure they did something like that for my oolong, since it wasn’t even too hot to drink when I got it.

Michelle Butler Hallett

The cold water addition is all well and good, but DavidsTea makes a big deal of water temp (rightly) on the tea labels, so why don’t they have at least two different water temps on the go, one for black and herbal, and a slightly cooler one for oolong, green and white? Scalded leaves are not going to entice anyone to the joys of oolong, white and green, unless all that extra flavouring hides the bitterness of scalded leaves. Personally, I’d be annoyed to see anyone (making tea for me) dunk tea into water rather than pour water onto tea. I’m still sore over the wrecked cup of vanilla oolong from a few weeks ago.

I just hit a new low in tea-dorkdom with this comment.

Wayne

I find it difficult when talking to friends and colleagues about tea not to go into a downward spiral of tea-dorkdom, and I often find myself rambling and asking myself “wait, do they really care..?” :P

And I know what you mean about the “dunking” – it just seems wrong, somehow.

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Bio

Writer and tea fiend. Author of DELUDED YOUR SAILORS, SKY WAVES, DOUBLE-BLIND, and THE SHADOW SIDE OF GRACE.

I prefer straight teas but will try almost anything … so long as it’s not tainted with hibiscus. I loathe hibiscus.

Oolongs and blacks are my favourites.

Location

St John’s, Newfoundland, Canada

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