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I was quite perplexed with this tea. A worker at Peet’s told me that this was one of the more sought after ones at their location. The tin felt heavier than the other teas, and for good reason: the leaves were compressed as is customary for pu-erh teas. The tea bricks themselves smelled very earthy (not the typical pu-erh “earthy”) and bitter. I got a more pungent smell when I actually brewed it.

Brewed Tea:
The color of the brew was very dark, even after lightly “rinsing” it with a miniature steeping. It started off as a light pink, but as the brick dissolved, the pink turned into a reddish-brown within seconds. This fascinated me quite a bit, as I had never seen a loose leaf tea change color as dramatically as this before. Then again, the directions called for a much longer steeping than I usually give Pu-erhs.

The taste was as it smelled for the first brew: Earthy, bitter, with an acidic aftertaste. But another element decided to show up as well. It was nutty, and tasted like a bitter baking flour. The after taste was not very pleasing either. I still had a bitter nut flavor in the back of my throat.

Unsatisfied with the first brew, I decided to have a second steeping. After all, I heard so much about this tea from the staff, and one of the locals. And I supposed that the first brew washed the tea enough for a second brew.

The second steeping was MUCH more welcoming than the first. The earthy flavor had become more typical, and more enjoyable. In fact, I quite liked the second steeping. This time, the earthy taste was still present, but the nutty flavor had been replaced by a more vegetal one (very unexpected). This one was more smooth, and the beverage had a slightly lighter color. It was a dark red now. However, I still did not like the acidic after taste.

I brewed the tea twice with the directions provided, and twice using a more traditional method with shorter steeps.

I suppose I’ll rate this tea based on the experience over all. I will not be drinking this pu-erh regularly, as I would with others. The character changed quite dramatically between steeps, and proved to be uneven. This tea was not wonderful, but not terrible either; it was centered in between the two.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C
Bonnie

Sounds weird like the puerh was blended with something else.

Scharp

It did taste blended; kind of like pu-erh with some type of fruit or nut. I reviewed this tea a while ago, and decided it was time to give it another try. I edited my review based on both experiences (old and new).

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Bonnie

Sounds weird like the puerh was blended with something else.

Scharp

It did taste blended; kind of like pu-erh with some type of fruit or nut. I reviewed this tea a while ago, and decided it was time to give it another try. I edited my review based on both experiences (old and new).

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Bio

Jared Sharp
I love drinking and reviewing tea. Green, Oolong, Black, White, Yellow, Dark, Pu-erh… It’s all great. In particular, my favorites are Taiping Hou Kui, and Aged Teas.

I’m currently in California, and started my interest in tea at a very young age. Ever since, I’ve looked for exotic, rare, and even newly-developed teas to try.

It doesn’t end there: I’ll try just about any tea new to me that crosses my path.

I typically brew tea in a traditional manner (different teas require different steeping times and water temperatures, ect…). Whichever directions are on the packaging or website, I tend to follow as well.

I’m also building a private collection of Pu-Erh teas and teas good for Aging. Hopefully, they’ll turn out nice.

Companies: If you are looking for a reviewer for tea, I would be happy to sample any of the teas you offer.

Message me for Sample swapping.

Location

California

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