89

The most prominent trait of this tea is the smell of smokiness. When I opened the tea can, the first thing that came into my head was smoked meat. I actually liked this smell, and it made me hungry. I picked this tea, because everywhere it is advertised, it is described as a very strong tea. I love strong teas.

When I brewed the tea, I got a very nice reddish-orange color. The smoky hinge was still there. I felt like I were sitting next to a campfire. The taste was smoky as well. However, even with 5 minutes of steeping, the tea did not seem as strong as advertised. I had 2 cups already from different steepings, and got the same result.

It was surprisingly smooth, and I could barely taste the flavor of a typical black tea from China underneath. Basically, it tasted as if I were drinking smoked meat Keemun. Despite not being as strong as I would have hoped, I liked this tea.

The smoky taste seemed to linger for several minutes after drinking. Next time, I’ll try steeping it for 6 minutes, to see if I can get more of a malty taste. This is a good tea for breakfast, and the afternoon.

Preparation
Boiling 5 min, 0 sec
Kat1

Just curious — I notice you are indicating for most of your reviews that you have the water at boiling temperature? If so, most teas are meant to be steeped with water in the 190’s, not boiling. Have you tried a slightly cooler steep water, so undesired flavors are not released from the “fried” leaves?

Scharp

Very interesting that you should ask that. Yes, I have tried lower boiling temperatures, especially for teas that aren’t black. Green teas are about 70C, for example. However, most black teas are recommended to have a water temperature at 100C, or at a “rolling boil”. You will find I steep the teas according to both their directions, and the temperature at which they are supposed to bring out their true flavor.

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Kat1

Just curious — I notice you are indicating for most of your reviews that you have the water at boiling temperature? If so, most teas are meant to be steeped with water in the 190’s, not boiling. Have you tried a slightly cooler steep water, so undesired flavors are not released from the “fried” leaves?

Scharp

Very interesting that you should ask that. Yes, I have tried lower boiling temperatures, especially for teas that aren’t black. Green teas are about 70C, for example. However, most black teas are recommended to have a water temperature at 100C, or at a “rolling boil”. You will find I steep the teas according to both their directions, and the temperature at which they are supposed to bring out their true flavor.

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Bio

Jared Sharp
I love drinking and reviewing tea. Green, Oolong, Black, White, Yellow, Dark, Pu-erh… It’s all great. In particular, my favorites are Taiping Hou Kui, and Aged Teas.

I’m currently in California, and started my interest in tea at a very young age. Ever since, I’ve looked for exotic, rare, and even newly-developed teas to try.

It doesn’t end there: I’ll try just about any tea new to me that crosses my path.

I typically brew tea in a traditional manner (different teas require different steeping times and water temperatures, ect…). Whichever directions are on the packaging or website, I tend to follow as well.

I’m also building a private collection of Pu-Erh teas and teas good for Aging. Hopefully, they’ll turn out nice.

Companies: If you are looking for a reviewer for tea, I would be happy to sample any of the teas you offer.

Message me for Sample swapping.

Location

California

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