892 Tasting Notes

80
drank Jane's Garden by Harney & Sons
892 tasting notes

I love roses, so when I learned that Harney & Sons Jane’s Garden tea was a blend of Chinese bancha and rose petals, I could not resist. The bancha is the same as the one used in Pan Asia, so I already knew that I liked it. My order placed yesterday arrived in lightening time—yet another reason to love H&S (as though I needed more…)—so my first pot of the day (POD) had to be Jane’s Garden!

The dark green dried leaves in the loose tea (I bought a big bag) are very big: wide and long and flat. The scent is that peculiarly delightful aroma which wafts off—and only off—bancha. There are many beautiful dried rose petals throughout the bancha, so I was expecting more of a rose scent—and also flavor in the brewed tea.

The liquor is pale yellow veering toward green, and the scent and taste are of high-quality bancha. I detect very little rose flavor or scent whatsoever. I’ll definitely be brewing this up side-by-side with Pan Asia one of these days to see if the roses become more noticeable when juxtaposed with the chrysanthemums, which I have found much more redolent in my cups of Pan Asia.

For now, I am happy to have a big fresh bag of fragrant bancha, which happens also to be decorated with beautiful roses!


second infusion: very light but still thirst quenching—I drank this pot after dinner.

Preparation
170 °F / 76 °C 2 min, 15 sec 3 tsp 18 OZ / 532 ML
TheTeaFairy

Sounds lovely :-)

sherapop

It is, TeaFairy! I happen to like bancha, which gets a bad rap, imnsho. I certainly do not regard it as “inferior sencha”, as some have alleged. To me, bancha is an entirely different tea!

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78

Hoping to get some quality rest tonight, I decided to imbibe a cup of Tazo Rest before retiring. Sweet rose petals are somehow so soothing…

Flavors: Flowers

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60
drank Vanilla Apricot White by Tazo
892 tasting notes

I have no idea whether Tazo still makes Vanilla Apricot White, but I found an errant filterbag in my “maybe I’ll drink this someday” tea chest of stray envelopes without boxes. I don’t recall ever having purchased or consumed this tea, so perhaps I received it as a free sample somewhere…

The tea offers a light apricot flavor, and that’s about it. I don’t detect much in the way of vanilla. It’s possible that this bag is so old that the vanilla evaporated away, but the brewed liquor, which is a lovely peach color, tastes fine—not stale. It just tastes like apricot, not really much else. On the bag it is described as “a delicate tea”, and I’d have to agree.

Flavors: Apricot

Preparation
170 °F / 76 °C 3 min, 30 sec

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68

Paradoxically, although Choice Premium Japan Green tea tastes marginally better than Touch Organic Green, I have concluded that in an all-things-considered analysis, Touch wins the steep-off.

In truth, I do not recommend either of these teas, since there are much better options for filter bag sencha. Both Harney & Sons Japanese Sencha and Stash Premium Green are better and cost less than the Choice. The Touch costs one-third what the Choice costs, but the Choice is not three times better, hence the in some ways bizarre result of this afternoon’s steep-off!

Preparation
170 °F / 76 °C 3 min, 0 sec 2 g 10 OZ / 295 ML

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72

In this afternoon’s steep-off chez sherapop, two organic filter bag green teas wrapped in open-air paper envelopes are going sniff to sniff and sip to sip against one another. The first up is Touch Organic Green Tea. Vying to rule the category “organic filter bag green tea wrapped in open-air paper envelope” is Choice Premium Japanese Green (also organic). The Touch hails from China, but is a similar style of tea.

My first observation is that the Touch Organic Green is more golden and less cloudy than the Choice. This led me immediately to predict that the Choice would be more flavorful, being both more cloudy and more green. This is true. The Choice also tastes and smells more like sencha than does the Touch Organic Green.

Neither of these teas claims on the packaging to be sencha, so I don’t want to go overboard here. I hasten to add, however, that calling a tea “Premium Japanese Green” naturally suggests as much, since most of the tea produced and consumed in japan is indeed sencha.

I now suspect that the Touch may be a Chinese bancha or a blend of Chinese bancha and Chinese sencha. It’s also possible that the Choice is a blend of Japanese sencha and bancha. Why else would they not take credit for being pure sencha, if that is what it is?

In any case, I find the flavor of the Choice to be richer than the Touch. The Touch is still highly potable and the price is ridiculously low for a decent organic green tea. Is it worth it to pay the same price for only one-third the number of bags in order to taste the marginally better Choice, which however costs more per bag than Harney & Sons Japanese Sencha and yet is not nearly so good?

In this sort of cost-benefit analysis—which I generally eschew, but seeing as today’s steep-off is between grocery store teas, it seems not inappropriate—I end up coming to the conclusion that, despite its slightly inferior taste, Touch is a much better deal, all things considered, than the Choice! If I’m going to pay the price for Choice filter bags, why not just go Harney instead?

Preparation
170 °F / 76 °C 3 min, 0 sec 2 g 10 OZ / 295 ML

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82
drank Bancha Shizuoka by Thé Santé
892 tasting notes

This Bancha Shizuoka was another recent discovery for me thanks to Thé Santé. It definitely has that characteristic (and indescribable!) scent and flavor of bancha. I wish that I could explain what it smells like. It has the appeal of sniffing glue somehow…

Anyway, the strongly scented dark green sheaths produce a pale yellow liquor bursting with bancha flavor. Yum. I consumed many pounds of bancha in the past, and at one point it became my ichiban Japanese green! Now I’ve been exploring gyokuro and haute sencha, but this Bancha Shizuoka has a welcome place in my cupboard. A very flavorful green tea.


second infusion: delicious!


third infusion: equally delicious!

Preparation
170 °F / 76 °C 2 min, 30 sec 2 tsp 12 OZ / 354 ML

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78
drank Pan Asia by Harney & Sons
892 tasting notes

I’ve been craving bancha, so I brewed up a glass of Harney & Sons Pan Asia as my first tea of the day (TOD). This simple blend features Chinese bancha decorated and scented with chrysanthemum flowers. The flower buds are so beautiful in the sachets, and the dark green bancha leaves are long and flat and wide—just as bancha should be!

I really like this floral green, even though I usually drink my green teas unadulterated. Pan Asia offers nice change of pace with the slightest hint of florality atop the quite decent bancha shining through below.


second infusion: I ended up drinking a second cup of Pan Asia today, so I reserved both spent sachets for some post-dinner, decaffeinated Pan Asia. The sachets are very generously stoked with leaves, so I’m glad that I reinfused them because the resultant liquor was very good!


third infusion: this was weaker but still potable

Flavors: Flowers

Preparation
170 °F / 76 °C 2 min, 30 sec 2 g 10 OZ / 295 ML

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74

I’ve been obsessed with Harney & Sons Chamomile of late, so I have not brewed up any Celestial Seasonings Chamomile in quite some time. Once again, it seems better than expected. They appear to use both Egyptian and Mexican chamomile flowers in this simple filter bag. The result is yellow and soothing. Clearly this is a competent chamomile!

This marks the end of tonight’s Celestial Seasonings binge. Bonne nuit!

Flavors: Flowers

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 6 min, 0 sec

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68

Tonight’s glass of Celestial Seasonings Honey Vanilla Chamomile tasted and smelled a bit off. I cannot figure out what the problem was. Perhaps the chicory was too strong in this particular filter bag? I don’t know, but I am definitely sure now that I prefer Sleepytime Vanilla. Yesterday, I thought that the chamomile was dominant, but this brew smells and tastes rather woody, strangely enough. I cannot really figure out what else may be the culprit. Lemongrass? No. Licorice? No. I’m guessing that it’s the chicory.

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71

Feeling nostalgic about Boulder, I decided to binge on Celestial Seasonings tonight. First up was Sleepytime Vanilla. Judging by the number of bags left in my various CS boxes, this must be my favorite! The vanilla is really smooth and somehow the infusion has body and substance even while containing no camellia sinensis.

Flavors: Flowers, Vanilla

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 6 min, 45 sec

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Profile

Bio

A long-time tea and perfume lover, I have recently begun to explore the intersections between the two at my blog: http://salondeparfum-sherapop.blogspot.com//

I participate at fragrance community websites, and I care about tea as much as perfume, so why not belong to Steepster as well?

A few words about my ratings. In assessing both teas and perfumes, my evaluation is “all things considered.” Teas do not differ very much in price (relative to perfumes or any luxury items), so I do not usually consider the price when rating a tea.

What I do consider is how the particular tea compares to teas of its own type. So I might give a high rating to a fine herbal infusion even though I would never say that it is my favorite TEA. But if it’s good for what it is, then it deserves a high rating. There is no point in wishing that a chamomile blend was an Assam or a sencha tea!

Any rating below 50 means that I find the liquid less desirable to drink than plain water. I may or may not finish the cup, depending upon how thirsty I am and whether there is another hot beverage or (in summertime) a source of fresh water available.

From 50 to 60 indicates that, while potable, the tea is not one which I would buy or repurchase, if I already made the mistake (I have learned) of purchasing it.

From 60 to 70 means that the tea is drinkable but I have criticisms of some sort, and I probably would not purchase or repurchase the tea as I can think of obvious alternatives which would be better.

From 70 to 80 is a solid brew which I would purchase again.

From 80 to 90 is good stuff, and I probably need to have some ready at hand in my humble abode.

From 90 to 100 is a tea (or infusion) which I have come to depend on and look forward to imbibing again and again—if possible!

If you are interested in perfume, you might like my 2300+ perfume reviews, most of which have been archived at sherapop’s sillage (essentially my perfumelog):

http://sherapop.blogspot.com/

Location

Somerville, Massachusetts, USA

Website

http://salondeparfum-sherapop...

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