620 Tasting Notes

33

Yay! A smoky tea, in fact it is THE smoky tea, the one that started it all, Lapsang Souchong. Black tea smoked over a pine fire, imbuing the leaves with its smoky essence. The aroma of this one is certainly smoky, though honestly I am not getting much of the usual piney camp fire in this one, I am getting more of a smoked meat aroma. There are also notes of leather and malt, an interesting smelling tea. Brewing it up I notice that the notes of smoke loose some of their meatiness and have more of a liquid smoke aroma, along with maltiness and a touch of sweetness.

So, I once said I never met a Lapsang Souchong I didn’t like, and sadly I think I have to change my opinion on that. This tea tasted like liquid smoke, beef jerky, and malt. It has a bitter finish that I was not most fond of, so I foisted it off on Ben who was also not a fan but wanted tea and drank it anyway. I am not quite sure what went wrong, pretty much immediately after drinking this tea I developed a splitting headache, so maybe it was something wrong with me, since I am not sure I am ready to admit I did not like a Lapsang.

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2015/02/simple-loose-leaf-co-op-box-day-2.html

Kirkoneill1988

beef jerky, sounds lovely

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83

Imagine my surprise at seeing Gyokuro as one of the teas for this month, then imagine my surprise when I actually looked at the leaves, it looks nothing like the needly Gyokuro leaves I am familiar with! It kinda looks a lot like Tencha, the leaves that are ground into making Matcha, but that is crazy rare, since it is wanted to make said powdery goodness. The aroma of the leaves is a blend of green notes and a tiny bit of toasted rice crackers. You know, those delicious Japanese crackers that have bits of seaweed and such? I used to be addicted to those once upon a time. The green notes are a mix of fresh hay, sweetgrass, actual grass, and a tiny bit of seaweed.

I brewed this in the standard Gyokuro way, lots of leaf and cool temperatures, it is always fun brewing gyokuro, though I do wish I had a shiboridashi! The aroma is a mix of green growing hay, freshly cut grass, a bit of Nori, and a little like rice. As expected the mouthfeel is thick and syrupy, the taste is so sweet it is almost syrupy as well, that is a potent sweetness! Like honey and sweet hay, this transitions to a more umami seaweed and lastly a bit of bok choy. A few minutes after the sipping and there is a sweetness in my mouth from it. Hilariously I did another steep but got distracted…came back about 20 minutes later, I drank it because YOLO and it was actually pretty tasty. Super green and umami, but tasty!

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2015/02/simple-loose-leaf-co-op-box-day-1.html

Mike

Nice, it’s gyokuro day! :P I just finished my Teavana gyokuro…I’ll have to try this one next! Great review!

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96

It has become a bit rare that I run into an Oolong I have not heard of, so yeah, I went into immediate research mode while drinking the Sheng Cha Oolong. For the most part I could not find much, mostly I kept finding information on Puerh and since I do not know what version of Sheng it is, that made searching even harder. What I did find is that it is from Taiwan, specifically they are from trees left to grow wild for decades, which is pretty cool. The aroma of the leaves is delectably toasty, it smells like baking super grain heavy bread, you know, like one of those 20 grains breads. Now take that loaf of bread and drizzle a bit of honey on it and you have the aroma of this tea. I am salivating, but I am in a constant state of craving bread, so that could be why.

The aroma of the first steep is so grainy! Like someone is toasting grains right next to me, it is honestly a little cruel how much this tea smells like toasted wheat, sesame seeds, and barley. The taste is banging hot, and not in a ‘oh god I burned my tongue so bad’ way, I mean this is the new hotness. It is like drinking honey drizzled whole grain bread while sitting next to a vase of wildflowers. The majority of the taste is toasted grains and yeasty bread, but there are delicate notes of flowers and honey, which I really liked.

Second steep is very similar in aroma, there was a touch of toasted peanuts as well this time around. The taste is more grain and less sweet, it is definitely like eating toast. I am a little wowed by the grainy aspects of this tea, I could see it being a good bread replacement when I am shambling around the house moaning graaaaiiiinns like a gluten craving zombie.

Blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2015/02/simple-loose-leaf-co-op-box-day-1.html

TeaTiff

This is the second glowing review of this tea I have seen. Maybe he will bring some to KC when he comes?

Tealizzy

Yum! I haven’t tried this one yet! Maybe tonight!!

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68

Well, the inevitable happened, I have become addicted to another game. This time around it is the game Plague Inc that has hooked me, it is a strategy game where you play as a strain of (in my case) bacteria trying to wipe out humanity. I also hate this game because I spent hours staring at my phone playing and did not win a single game, this game is hard! Currently I am playing the free version, but I really want the full version, but no offense phone, I want it on my computer. Sadly I lack the $15 to shell out on a new game, and if I had it I would be putting it towards finally getting Minecraft on the PC, le sigh, so many games, so little time.

Today’s tea for What-Cha Wednesday is Ceylon Golden Tips Black Tea, it is so fuzzy and pretty, very golden! Ok, you guys caught me red handed, I spent way too much time staring at the leaves, they are adorably downy, like little caterpillars, though what really struck me was how they have a slight silvery sheen to them, unlike the fuzzy golds from China, which are Shining Gold (yes like the Citadel paint) these have a dullness too them. This tea fascinated me, though I do wish there had been a tiny bit more information as to where in Sri Lanka they come from. The aroma of the fuzzy leaves is iconically a Ceylon, it is brisk and bright, but it also has notes of oak wood, roasted peanuts, distant flowers, malt, and fruit. The fruit notes are muscatel and cherry, in fact, this tea reminds me of a three way dance between an Assam, Ceylon, and Darjeeling, how fascinating! The aroma is not overwhelmingly strong, it is delicate and a bit pretty, much like the leaves themselves.

I waffled back and forth as to whether or not I wanted to go Western or Gongfu style for steeping, deciding on Gongfu for now. The aroma of the now soggy and not quite so golden leaves is pretty malty and brisk, it wakes up my nose with an almost effervescent quality (I love when I have an excuse to use that word) the sharp notes of oak wood blend with a touch of flowers and muscatel sweetness. The liquid lacks all briskness, it is smooth and sweet with notes of malt and a creamy touch of cocoa, it is almost like night and day!

The first steep is surprisingly light in color and taste, also the brew is cloudy from all the leaf fuzz, this might be the first time I have ever wanted a strainer because I am pretty sure I could have made an adorable little fluff ball out of all the fuzz. The taste starts out with delicate notes of fresh grapes and malt, this transitions to cocoa that lingers. I am surprised at how smooth the mouthfeel is, I was expecting it to be all tickly from the fuzz.

The second steep, oddly, has pretty much no aroma at all, there is a tiny hint of malt and that it is. The taste was also a bit odd, there was a surprising note of rich yam and a bit of malt, that was about it. It was strange how this tea seemed to lack all body and yet had such a rich yam note.

So, clearly I need to steep this tea Western style to see how it compares, and I can safely say that this tea is one of the strangest I have encountered! While it lacked any and all body, it had a really delicious taste. The taste is a blend of raisins, malt, a touch of cocoa and a tiny bit of maple syrup at the finish. I am baffled how a tea can have a lovely taste but absolutely no substance and weight, it was like drinking warm flavored water instead of tea. It confuses me! It does not taste stale or off in anyway, just like the ‘cha qi’ or lifeforce of the tea has been removed, maybe this tea was attacked by a tea vampire or something. I dunno, I feel very conflicted by this tea, it tasted nice but was so lacking in oomph, so yeah, I am going to blame pixies or something fantasy related as to why this was the case.

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2015/02/what-cha-ceylon-golden-tips-black-tea.html

OMGsrsly

Bunnicula got to the tea. For sure. :)

Amanda 'SoggyEnderman' Wilson

Eeee! I loved Bunnicula as a kid, thank you so much for that reference!

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68

Well, the inevitable happened, I have become addicted to another game. This time around it is the game Plague Inc that has hooked me, it is a strategy game where you play as a strain of (in my case) bacteria trying to wipe out humanity. I also hate this game because I spent hours staring at my phone playing and did not win a single game, this game is hard! Currently I am playing the free version, but I really want the full version, but no offense phone, I want it on my computer. Sadly I lack the $15 to shell out on a new game, and if I had it I would be putting it towards finally getting Minecraft on the PC, le sigh, so many games, so little time.

Today’s tea for What-Cha Wednesday is Ceylon Golden Tips Black Tea, it is so fuzzy and pretty, very golden! Ok, you guys caught me red handed, I spent way too much time staring at the leaves, they are adorably downy, like little caterpillars, though what really struck me was how they have a slight silvery sheen to them, unlike the fuzzy golds from China, which are Shining Gold (yes like the Citadel paint) these have a dullness too them. This tea fascinated me, though I do wish there had been a tiny bit more information as to where in Sri Lanka they come from. The aroma of the fuzzy leaves is iconically a Ceylon, it is brisk and bright, but it also has notes of oak wood, roasted peanuts, distant flowers, malt, and fruit. The fruit notes are muscatel and cherry, in fact, this tea reminds me of a three way dance between an Assam, Ceylon, and Darjeeling, how fascinating! The aroma is not overwhelmingly strong, it is delicate and a bit pretty, much like the leaves themselves.

I waffled back and forth as to whether or not I wanted to go Western or Gongfu style for steeping, deciding on Gongfu for now. The aroma of the now soggy and not quite so golden leaves is pretty malty and brisk, it wakes up my nose with an almost effervescent quality (I love when I have an excuse to use that word) the sharp notes of oak wood blend with a touch of flowers and muscatel sweetness. The liquid lacks all briskness, it is smooth and sweet with notes of malt and a creamy touch of cocoa, it is almost like night and day!

The first steep is surprisingly light in color and taste, also the brew is cloudy from all the leaf fuzz, this might be the first time I have ever wanted a strainer because I am pretty sure I could have made an adorable little fluff ball out of all the fuzz. The taste starts out with delicate notes of fresh grapes and malt, this transitions to cocoa that lingers. I am surprised at how smooth the mouthfeel is, I was expecting it to be all tickly from the fuzz.

The second steep, oddly, has pretty much no aroma at all, there is a tiny hint of malt and that it is. The taste was also a bit odd, there was a surprising note of rich yam and a bit of malt, that was about it. It was strange how this tea seemed to lack all body and yet had such a rich yam note.

So, clearly I need to steep this tea Western style to see how it compares, and I can safely say that this tea is one of the strangest I have encountered! While it lacked any and all body, it had a really delicious taste. The taste is a blend of raisins, malt, a touch of cocoa and a tiny bit of maple syrup at the finish. I am baffled how a tea can have a lovely taste but absolutely no substance and weight, it was like drinking warm flavored water instead of tea. It confuses me! It does not taste stale or off in anyway, just like the ‘cha qi’ or lifeforce of the tea has been removed, maybe this tea was attacked by a tea vampire or something. I dunno, I feel very conflicted by this tea, it tasted nice but was so lacking in oomph, so yeah, I am going to blame pixies or something fantasy related as to why this was the case.

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2015/02/what-cha-ceylon-golden-tips-black-tea.html

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86

I am just waking up from a not too restful nap and thought to myself, I should write! Clearly that is why my nap was not a good one, I have too many tea thoughts floating in my gourd. Or it could be that I just wanted to drink some tea, that honestly tends to wake me up at all sorts of odd hours, and of course I have to listen to the leaf when it calls me.

Today we are looking at a very well loved kind of tea, a green that is also loaded with citrus! Trader Leaf’s Smooth Citrus fits that description to a tea (oh no, I am making half asleep puns) being a blend of Green Tea, Lime Pieces, Calendula and Sunflower Petals, and Natural Flavors. For years I thought I hated citrus in my tea, all those lemony iced teas in the South filled me with a great deal of displeasure, turns out I only really disliked black teas with citrus, though that does need to be retested since I am always surprising myself with new things I like that I previously didn’t. The aroma of the tea is a blend of lemonade and fresh cut grass, there is a hint of growing things, and the slightly more savory (at least to me) notes of limes. It is refreshing and evocative of summertime and sunshine, and this is why I like green teas with citrus, the smell just makes me happy! And if you are a follower of aromatherapy you are not surprised since citrus is notorious for doing just that.

Brewing the leaves turns them into a citrus explosion, boom, lemons and limes everywhere! There is a bright green undertone that reminds me more of lemon leaves and fresh grass then it does tea, well those notes added to a pile of fresh squeezed lemons. The liquid is a bit more mellowed out, not some much a citrus explosion, but more if lemons and limes added to things. There are notes of mown grass and lemon leaves, the tea smells more savory than sweet, which is making my mouth water a bit. But I am the kind of gal who likes her lemons and limes covered in salt or in savory dishes, so this is right up my alley.

Whoa! (and not in the apathetic Keanu Reeves sort of way) that is a lot of lemon, so much lemon taste. Like a blend of freshly squeezed lemons and limes and a pile of lemon leaves. After the initial citrus burst the green tea waves its little leafy hands in my mouth…that was a weird phrase…but it oddly works…with notes of freshly mown grass, a bit of sweet nutty sesame, and a very bright, clean presence. This tea tastes refreshing and clean, like a summer sunrise where there is just that tiny chill in the air and everything sparkles with dew. Once the months get warmer I am going to try this tea cold steeped, it is practically mandatory with it being such a summery blend.

For blog and review: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2015/02/trader-leaf-smooth-citrus-tea-review.html

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96

I really need to sit down and start work on my book. Yes, I have decided to write a tea book, I have been bandying the idea around for a while now and finally decided to do it after numerous people encouraged me to do it (thanks guys!) The only problem is setting down and deciding what I want it to be like. I was originally planning on having an all encompassing work of awesome, but Tony Gebely of World of Tea is already working on that (so excited for release!!) so now I am working on figuring out the tone, any thoughts potential readers? And research, currently my chart of teas from around the world is at 45 pages and so not close to being finished. You all know me and my obsession with research!

The first time I had this tea was back in 2012, that seems like forever ago, so I figured it was time to revisit it. At the time I was brewing tea primarily Western style, so I thought that brewing Adagio Teas’ Hunan Gold in my antique gaiwan would be rather fun. So, this is a Yellow Tea, and in typical me fashion I went hunting down more info, and did not have much in the way of luck. I can tell you this is a yellow tea from Hunan, and that really is it, to make up for it I shall thoroughly describe my experience with these twisting, downy leaves. First up, the aroma is like spring time, specifically it evokes my favorite flower (ok one of them, I really love flowers) peony! It also has the aroma of delicate orange blossoms, chestnuts, and just a hint of mown grass and honey. The notes are delicate, reminding me more of a breeze bringing in these aromas through an open window rather than sitting next to a spring bouquet.

Brewing the leaves, I was greeted with the aroma of flowers and a bit of muscatel and briskness, Adagio compares this tea to a Darjeeling and I can see similarities between it and a first flush (or a yellow Darjeeling) though it is more floral than muscatel. The liquid lacks the muscatel, but is a powerhouse of peony (never realized how much I wanted to say that until now) along with some delicate freshly mown hay and orange blossoms.

First steep is pleasantly golden in color, I admit I was expecting a lighter tea, but this color is really pretty so I am totally ok with it. There is a similarity to Darjeeling, a bit muscatel and like nasturtium, though the similarity is fairly mild. The real show stopper with this tea is peony, more teas need to taste like peony! I love that not quite heady spring aroma and taste that peony notes give to a tea, it makes me immensely happy. There are also notes of corn fluff (as I like to call corn silk) and bok choy.

Steeping again, the aroma is still a peony powerhouse, but it is happily joined by nasturtium and mown hay, that peppery nasturtium note is killing me. I really need to try and grow some this year, I am terrible at gardening. The taste is very similar to the first steep, with just a bit more nasturtium and bok choy. At the end there is a brisk note and a honey aftertaste.

Third steep, honestly it was totally indistinguishable from the second, I do not feel like I actually had a different cup, perhaps I accidentally fell into a very strange time loop! As the tea cools I do notice that the peony note is stronger and lingers into the aftertaste. Overall I really like this tea, like a lot, I think it might have to be one I keep around for peony emergencies.

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2015/02/adagio-teas-hunan-gold-tea-review.html

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84

Hooray! The horrid headache that I had yesterday seems to have mostly calmed down, I am worried it might be a side effect of my sleep meds, but I get awful headaches quite often, so probably not. My sleeping seems to be better, even if my sleep schedule seems to be all over the place, with luck that will even itself out soon. More important news, guess who is getting back into Dropzone Commander, yeah it is me, no real guess there. I had put it to the wayside for a while to focus on other things (and it seemed that no one was playing it at Tabletop) so when I got back from PA and found out it had become popular, well, time to get back to work on painting the Scourge! Brain-slugs for life! In all honestly I love the Scourge, but they are so creepy.

I heard that the best way to keep the Scourge from possessing you is tea (or a salt based shampoo) so that means it is time to break out some Golden Tips Tea! Today we are looking at Giddapahar Muscatel Darjeeling Black Tea Second Flush, I go back and forth as to which flush of Darjeeling is my favorite, clearly I need to sample a lot more before I can make an assessment, I know it is greatly based on my moods. So, about this particular Darj (is it considered uncouth to shorten the name, hope not because I have been doing it for year, at least it doesn’t sound as bad as when I shorten the name of Puerh!) it comes from Giddapahar (whose name translates to Eagle Cliffs) Tea Estate, located in the beautiful (seriously, I was just daydreaming over photos) Kurseong Valley, this particular estate was established in 1881 and has some of the oldest China bush varietals. It is actually thought that the second flush rather than the first flush is the best produced by this estate, being extremely heavy in the muscatel notes. Tea, you had me at muscatel, it might be one of my favorite notes in tea because (depending on flush) it reminds me of either Scuppernongs or Muscadines, two of the best grapes ever and possibly the best food to come out of my homeland (it is the South in case you didn’t know…not that I ever shut-up about it) Anyway, the aroma of this tea, at first is loamy and roasted peanuts, and then like a small raisin themed explosion, the aroma blooms into muscadines and slightly spiced wine. At the finish there is a hint of honey and dry leaves. I admit I spent the majority of the time waiting for my kettle to heat up with my nose in the tea, I just go crazy for that muscatel aroma.

Once I give the tea its required steeping, the aroma is less muscatel, it is still there, but the wet leaves are overshadowed by autumn leaves and loam. The finish, again, is honey, this time joined with the distinct aroma of sultanas. The aroma of the liquid has a surprising note of malt and a strong presence, it is a heavy tea, like I am sinking into a teacup…that is a good sign! There are also notes of raisins and honey with a finish of loam and dry autumn leaves.

The tea starts out a bit dry then switches almost immediately to smooth, I always find it amusing when teas do that. The taste begins with malt and loam, it is a bit brisk, but as it switches to the smooth mouthfeel it also transitions to sweet muscatel and honey. I should say that the muscatel notes are more on the raisin side, and a little bit like muscadine jelly and a touch like a spicy red wine. I am sure people who are into wine can name it perfectly, but since I have only memories of tastes and not names I cannot give an exact comparison. I liked this tea, I was expected the taste to be like the aroma and have more of a muscatel explosion, but the more subtle notes are quite tasty too.

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2015/02/golden-tips-tea-giddapahar-muscatel.html

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82

So, I went to the doctors yesterday, mostly a maintenance visit, but also in hopes that he could do something about my insomnia (previous treatment had stopped working) and to send to me an allergy specialist. Both things worked wonderfully, I have a referral and some fancy new medicine to make me go night-night. I have mixed feelings on the meds themselves, on the one hand I slept for 14 hours (wow!) but on the other the act of falling asleep was rather unpleasant, so we shall see how that goes. My reason for sharing this with you is because I only woke up an hour ago, and hopefully this blog won’t be too loopy sounding!

So, today we are looking at Jubilee! No, not the (kinda terrible) X-men character who is rarely useful (especially if you are getting your info from the 90s animated show) but TeaLC’s colorful herbal blend. One thing this tea has in common with that Jubilee is the colorful fireworks in the tea, or at the very least a colorful blend of (all organic) Green Rooibos, Rose Petals, Mango Pieces, Calendula, Orange Peel, Apple Pieces, and Natural Essence. I am a sucker for colorful herbal teas, something about blending vibrant flower and fruit bits just makes me happy, which is probably the reason I would do just that as a kid with flowers from my mom’s garden, sometimes I would get really lucky and end up with a tasty tea. The aroma of this blend is a mixture of flowers, fruit, and Green Rooibos, which smells and tastes very different from its red counterpart, it has a sweet honey and straw aroma, with just a tiny hint of grass. The rose aroma blends well with the mango and citrus, giving the tea a tropical feel.

Giving the tea a steeping in my tea apparatus, the aroma that drifts out with the steam is much rosier and fruitier, with mango taking center stage, after this initial burst of sweet honey and freshly mown straw. The liquid is sweet and very heavy in the citrus department, along side this strong orange note is rose and straw, it smells quite fun, like a summer garden party.

I was pleasantly surprised by how delicate this tea is, but that seems to be the case every time I drink a blend with Green Rooibos, I am so used to Rooibos being so strong that its delicate green side surprises me. The taste starts as a delicate blend of roses and straw with a touch of honey sweetness, this transitions to sweet oranges and a touch of mango. This touch of mango gradually builds into a heavy mango explosion as it finally ends the sip, as expected the mango lingers as the aftertaste for quite a while, no complaints here since mangoes are one of my favorite fruits. So yes, even though this tea shares its name with a very lame (though useful at summer parties) X-men character, it is memorable and enjoyable.

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2015/02/tea-leaf-co-jubilee-tea-review.html

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89

I have a conundrum, I am very hungry and need to get out of my chair to do some things, but there is a sleeping cat in my lap. When I try to move she makes this pitiful mew and starts whapping me with her tail, for such a tiny cat her tail is ridiculously strong…so here I sit with my leg and backside falling more asleep because I don’t want to wake my cat up. I am hoping that me typing (and therefore making the arm her head is on move) will wake her up and send her to find a more comfy spot, but consider she is drooling and super content, I think I am stuck for a while.

Today’s is Thursday, so that means it is time to plunge into the depths of my notebook piles to have a Throw Back Thursday review, specifically Yezi Tea’s Wen Shan Pouchong Oolong Tea. This #TBT reminds me of three things: 1. I need to drink more tea from Yezi, 2. I need to drink more Pouchong (or Boa Zhong, dialect depending) and 3. I need to dedicate a Yixing to Pouchong because having a Yixing teapot dedicated to each kind of Oolong is a fantastic idea. So, this Pouchong is from the Wen Shan district of Taiwan, which explains the name. The aroma of the curly green leaves is like a spring themed explosion in my nose, there are intense notes of orchid, honeysuckle and lilac accompanied by fresh vegetation, mown hay, and a hint of sweet chestnut at the finish. It is powerful and heady, like being in a humid conservatory where everything is floral and intense.

Into the gaiwan it goes, this was back when all I had was one gaiwan, before my crazed addiction to gaiwans really took off. Once giving it a steeping I can say that the entire room smells like flowers, my notebook is very clear that it was intense, and also the letters list off the page a little, I remember this tea having an affect on me, it was my first Pouchong! There are notes of orchid, honeysuckle, wildflower honey, and a hint of orange blossoms, it is so sweet and heady. The liquid is unsurprisingly very floral, the expected notes of honeysuckle and orchid are present, but there is still the hint of orange blossoms and chestnut, blending the wet and dry leave’s notes.

First steeping, the taste is sweet and floral, I would even go as far as to say this tea is sublime…even if saying that feels a little silly. The mouthfeel is smooth, not as creamy as some oolongs can be, but more like the smoothness of a green tea, the taste while being intensely floral is also delicate, that is probably my favorite things about Pouchongs, how they balance the heady and delicate so elegantly. There are notes of orchid and honey suckle, along with orange blossoms and fresh vegetation.

The aroma of the second steep is much headier, the orchid note is the most prominent followed by honeysuckle and lilac. It smells pretty, a very evocative tea that fills my mind with flowers. The taste takes its cues from the aroma and steps its floral game up, along with its sweetness, and its vegetation. Come to think on it all the flavors from the first steep are presents, just all of them are more intense.

Third time’s the charm! The aroma of this steep is no where near as intense as the previous, it is still very floral but it is in the same intensity level as the first steep. The notes are a blend of orchid and orange blossom, with just a touch of honey. The taste is quite mild and surprisingly buttery this time around, the initial buttery and slightly vegetal notes fade to honey sweetness and a lingering orchid taste. Gotta love teas that have a floral note that sticks around after you are done sipping it!

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2015/02/yezi-tea-wen-shan-pouchong-oolong-tea.html

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Bio

My Rating Guide, This is a personal rating and not necessarily a reflection of the tea’s quality
100-Must have on hand, it is one of my favorite teas
85-99-Really good teas, like exquisitely good
65-84-Not bad, they can be good but generic, or just teas that I found enjoyably ok.
40-64-Not a favorite, but not terrible. I would drink it if it was in front of me but I doubt I would seek it out on my own.
20-40-Not the best tea ever, either it was not to my liking or it was really bland. Chances are I would turn this one down unless I was really thirsty.
0-19-No, just no. Either there was something wrong with this tea or it was utterly undrinkable by me.

I am a nerdy, obsessive, crafty, tea blogging, gaming nut. Yeah, that about sums me up! Ok, you want something more informative….

I am a Geek, hardcore fan-girl Geek. It shapes my life. I spend a large chunk of my life painting miniatures and contemplating my various army layouts. I hoard dice, get obsessed with games, and will talk about whatever fandom, game, etc that I am obsessed over until I am blue in the face. I am not just a gamer girl type Geek, I also fit in the collecting knowledge and spending way too much time reading and researching category of Geek.

But there is more to me than just being a giant nerd. I love tea, always have and have just gotten more and more obsessed as I get older. I love trying new teas and then writing lengthy descriptions about them on my blog, I love reading and researching the history and culture of tea, I love collecting tea pots and fancy tea tools.

When the weather allows it, I love to go mushroom hunting. I don’t eat them, instead I use them for photography and spore prints. I love nature and worked as a Naturalist in the Northwoods one summer, it might have been the best job ever.

I have Fibromyalgia, it sucks, but I feel people who are going to interact with me should know since I tend to vanish because of it so fair warning! I do tend to not vanish very long though. Also I have some ‘social disorders’ which basically translates to I am really awkward and bad at socializing, so forgive any lack of social graces.

I also have cats, love the ocean and all aquatic life, love cheese, and collect hats.

My favorite tea is definitely Oolong, but I also love Japanese greens and…ok I just love tea actually :P I am not a huge fan of lemony black teas or tart fruit teas. I also loathe hibiscus (usually)

This is my actual tea wishlist, you know that I actually update and keep track of…I tend to forget Steepster’s https://www.facebook.com/notes/amanda-wilson/tea-wishlishtshopping-list-perpetually-in-progress/10152336515414411 I use my steepster WL to keep track of teas I have had and really want more of :P

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Kansas City, MO

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