356 Tasting Notes

75

Well all, I am starting to feel better, it seems whatever was wrong with me is mostly on the mend, the only problem is I am bushed. I keep feeling really exhausted and sleeping a lot so my sleep schedule has gotten weird and I have some serious confusion as to what day it is! A few hearty meals and some rest should have me back to normal in no time. I did use some of my time today working on a new origami piece, a modular star themed kusudama that was a real pain to assemble when using slippery chiyogami, but worked quite well with junky memo paper.

Break out your Beret, because today’s tea is French Breakfast by Golden Moon Tea, a classic black tea from Kenilworth Estate in Sri Lanka (or Ceylon if you are old fashioned about it). The website recommends this tea for people who like ‘standard’ black tea or who are starting out on their adventure into loose leaf tea. I am most certainly not new to loose leaf tea, but I am always on the hunt for a new breakfast tea. The aroma of this tea is bright, bold, and malty with a hint of pecans and dried leaves. Very much a standard black tea indeed!

The brewed leaves are very bright and quite sweet with a berry like quality to it that blends with an oak wood aroma. It does not have a brisk quality, just bright and sweet. The aroma of the liquid sans leaves is malty and sweet, like caramel, with a nice oaky finish.

This tea has a nice mild briskness, just enough to wake you up but not too much, no need to worry about your moth turning inside out. There is a bold malty and oak wood taste that fades to a sweetness reminiscent of berries. Adding cream and sugar takes away that mild briskness and replaces it with a very smooth morning cup. I agree with the company’s description, this is a great beginners tea, but it has enough going on that it does not bore a more experienced sipper.

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2014/04/golden-moon-tea-french-breakfast-tea.html

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85

This is one of those days that I am so glad I have a notebook full of tasting notes to pull from, because yours truly is entirely unwell. Stuck in bed with a large mug of a trusty belly soothing herbal brew and surrounded by my cats, I feel many naps coming on as I try my best to recover from digestive tract trying to pull a coup d’etat. Before Morpheus takes me away on an adventure to slumber land, here is today’s spring themed tea.

Today’s tea came to me thanks to a little bit of luck, Tea Savant was having a giveaway on Facebook and I entered and won, go me! Unlike my usual loose leaf tea, Spring Jasmine Savant came to me in a nice pyramid bag. For the record, pyramid bags are certainly teabags that I do not mind since they usually use large leaves and allow the tea to expand. Plus, there is that useful convenience aspect of the tea being in a bag, hello easy cleanup! The aroma of the tea is very sweet and heady, with lots of jasmine flower heaviness. I have a mixed track record with Jasmine, I love it intensely but I have to be in the right mood because it is not a delicate flower, it has an intense headiness that feels heavy and makes me feel a bit sleepy. There is a faint hint of fresh vegetation tying in the green aspect of this flowery green tea.

The steeped teabag and accompanying tea has a rich and heady aroma, the jasmine is really quite intense. It reminds me of the Confederate Jasmine my mother and grandmother each had in their gardens, a very nostalgic aroma. There is a leafy aroma as well as jasmine, a tiny bit vegetal and a tiny bit fresh vegetation giving the tea a very nature like aroma.

At the first sip I notice there is mild vegetal and vegetation, a bit of grass, a bit of fresh leaves, and bit of kale giving the tea a tiny bit of that bitter herb taste. Of course there is a lot of jasmine, actually most of the taste of this tea is heady jasmine with its subtle sweetness and strong floral notes. It is a little overpowering but if you are in the mood for a strong jasmine tea, this really hits the spot. There is also a slightly fruity aftertaste which I really think adds to the experience. I do feel like this should be named Summer Jasmine Savant because it is very evocative of summer in full bloom rather than the delicate aspects of spring, but that is just me being silly.

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2014/04/tea-savant-spring-jasmine-savant-tea.html

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96

It was such a stormy day today! I believe the entire day was nothing but rain and storms, of course the plants loved all the nitrogen from the lightning. The tree buds seem to have become full leaves and everything is vibrantly verdant. Even though I was stuck in bed most the day I really enjoyed the weather and the smell of rain wafting through my window.

Today’s tea is Life In Teacup’s $1 tea sample for the month of April, 2006 Chang Tai “Seven Star-Alkaid” a Sheng Pu Erh made from Menghai leaves. I am still in the total noob stage when it comes to Sheng Pu Erh, since I have tried a grand total of five different ones, I not entirely sure how I feel about them as a whole yet, I certainly find them intriguing and want to try more! The aroma of this Pu Erh is really intriguing, blending sweet notes of anise, pine needles, hay and wet oak wood. It smells really clean and nature like, the sweetness is that of new growth and anise.

The rinsed and steeped leaves are very sweet, blending anise and pine resin, in fact there is a myrrh like resinous scent as well that blend really well with the anise aroma. There is a little bit of a wet pine wood and wet peat smell as well, I really enjoy the aroma of this Pu Erh’s wet leaves. The liquid’s aroma is a blend of sweet anise and wet wood, very light and unassuming.

First steeping sip time! The taste is very light and quite smooth in the mouth. The taste is one of sweet hay and honey that fades to a bit of peat. At the end of the taste there is a quick sourness that does that great salivary response I have come to associate with Sheng Pu Erh. Basically there is a sourness that causes you to salivate a lot, this in turn makes the remaining liquid in your mouth to taste very sweet. I believe that this sensation is called Hui Gan.

The liquid’s aroma for the second steep is much more pronounced (as expected) with stronger notes of anise and pine loam with a very faint hint of peat. The mouthfeel again is very smooth, and the taste is sweet with anise at first and fades to a rich peat taste. It has a very clean taste, which seems odd when you describe something that tastes like peat, but it tastes like clean peat and not moldy, rotten, peat.

The third steep really comes alive, the aroma of the liquid is more like the wet leaves, having notes of resin and anise with a strong peat presence. This steep has a bit of bitterness to it that fades to sourness and immediately explodes into sweetness. There is a taste of anise and cooling effect that makes this steeping very interesting. The finish is peat and earthy with a touch of old hay. I really enjoyed the complexity of this steep.

For the fourth steep’s aroma I notice that it is sweet with a bit of anise and straw, the aroma has a cooling effect on my nose which is very refreshing. The taste is sweet with an earthy backdrop. There are the notes of hay and anise, a bit of peat and a bit of loam.

The fifth and final steeping has a very warm aroma, like sun warmed hay and anise, it is much milder than the previous steep’s aroma. The taste is much milder as well, a bit of faint anise and warm hay, there is a bit of bitterness that explodes into sweetness that lingers. I really enjoyed this tea experience, certainly a good investment of a dollar!

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2014/04/life-in-teacup-2006-chang-tai-seven.html

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89

Last night I spent the entire night folding, it was great, made a few classic designs and tried out some new ones. My favorite of the new modular origami pieces that I worked on was a PHiZZ (pentagon hexagon zig-zag) Dodecahedron, the units are really simple to make, but interlocking the pieces can be a real pain. I foresee lots of them in my future.

Today’s tea has a bit of a smoky feel, a Gingerbread Smoke feel to be exact. This blend by 52teas is a combination of Premium Black Teas (including Lapsang Souchong) Ginger Root, and Organic Flavors. The aroma is more or less exactly what I expected from a tea named Gingerbread Smoke, it is quite richly smoky with warm spices and an especially strong kick of ginger. Everything about the aroma of this tea is warm, from the lingering memories of a fire to the spices, good for sniffing on a chilly evening.

Giving the leaves a nice steeping brings out a sweet quality to the spices and ginger, really bringing out the cookie quality of the tea. There is of course lots of smoke, though it is not as strong as the dry leaves. As a finish there is a hint of malt. The liquid is sweet ginger and lots of smoke, it also has a finish of malt…suddenly I am craving ginger snaps.

The taste is pretty true to the name, at first you get a surprisingly gentle burn of ginger, and of course where there is fire there is usually smoke, so the next taste note is the mild smoke. The tea has a natural sweetness from the ginger, which fades to a hint of oakiness. Usually I am not the biggest fan of 52tea’s black tea base (nothing wrong with it, just doesn’t do it for me) but this one I like, most likely thanks to the added Lapsang Souchong. Spicy smoky teas are a big win in my book now, certainly going to be on the lookout for more!

For photos (including origami!) and blog: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2014/04/52teas-gingerbread-smoke-tea-review.html

Stephanie

That is some badass origami :)

Amanda 'SoggyEnderman' Wilson

Thank you :) I am such a sucker for making modular origami, it is just so much fun!

carol who

Wow! Great origami!

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92

I woke up bright and early today thanks to the excessive happy chirping of birds and my cat chirping at the birds. Laying in bed I thought to myself, I should make some origami, and so I got all my paper out of storage and set it up in my craft and tea lair. Of course I promptly went back to sleep and have not actually started folding anything yet, but I am mulling over some projects, I am excited. I have a suspicion that I will hang lots of modular pieces from the rafters.

Today’s tea is Shincha from Onejima, Kagoshima from the Yamane-en Tea Shop and Yunomi.us. This particular Shincha (first flush of Sencha, for those unfamiliar with the term) comes from the rare Shouju Cultivar whose name translates to Eternal Happiness. With a name like that I knew I needed to try it, plus have I ever seen a Sencha that I didn’t immediately want to try? The aroma is very green, full of life and grass! There is also notes of cedar and straw with a touch of kelp. I am used to Sencha smelling faintly sweet, but these leaves are savory and green, I find it very intriguing and pleasant.

Once the delicate leaves get a dip in warm and fairly short bath, I notice the aroma gets more of a chestnut quality with a strong grassy note. This fades to a kelp and finally fresh sea-side air. I love when the aroma of tea evokes the ocean, it is just such a clean aroma. The liquid mixes the aroma of spring vegetation and sea-side air, primarily fresh grass, there is also a tiny touch of chestnut at the finish.

The first thing I notice about the taste is how sweet it is, surprisingly honey sweet compared to its savory aroma. The sweetness has an almost citrus quality, similar to orange blossom honey mixed with a gently and fresh grass taste. The midtaste is kelp, giving this tea an umami quality. Finishing the experience is a sweet citrus note that lingers in the mouth for quite a while. This tea manages to be very subtle while also being very complex, a quality I find very endearing.

As to be expected I wanted to have another dance with the leaves. The second steep, like the first starts off very sweet, but it differs by being more of a sugar cane sweetness instead of honey. The rest of the taste is buttery smooth and grassy with a gentle hint of hay. The second steep has a whole new level of subtlety that I find very soothing. I can imagine being a leaf absorbing sunlight while drinking this tea, it feels refreshing and soothing in that very manner.

For blog and Photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2014/04/yunomius-and-yamane-en-shincha-from.html

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90

I hope everyone had a nice Easter yesterday, or if Easter is not your thing, I hope you had a nice Sunday. I miss the Easter of my youth, it was never a religious holiday for me, more of a celebration of spring and family, a time of crafts and bunnies. Yesterday Ben’s family had a nice get together with food and familial love, the food was good but I was exceptionally homesick and missing my family. I look forward to this late fall and winter when I get to spend time with my peeps.

Today’s tea is a lovely blend straight from London, Upton Tea Import’s Baker Street Afternoon Blend, a blend of Lapsang Souching, Keemun, and Darjeeling. A perfect afternoon tea for sipping it one’s study, at least in my humble (mostly) English opinion. Sniffing the dry leaves transport me to a Victorian gentleman’s library, blending pipe smoke, polished wood, and a comfy leather chair. It is super evocative! There are also faint flora and muscatel notes, the aroma of the blend is quite delicious.

After giving the tea a good steeping and the wet leaves a good nose examination, I notice the aroma of the wet leaves are sweeter and more fruity, a blend of muscatel and dried cherries with smoky notes. It is rich and a bit brisk. The liquid has the aroma of smoke and fruit, it reminds me of the way fruit that has been cooked on a grill, so now instead of reminding me of a Victorian study, the aroma reminds me of a summer cookout.

Ok, time to get my British out, oh who am I kidding, it is always out! The taste is rich, smoky and muscatel with a tiny hint of cherry with an oak wood aftertaste. The mouthfeel is bright and smooth, a very nice afternoon tea. I wish it was a bit smokier, but I am a sucker for smoky teas, the smoke taste is very mild, so if you want a tea that only has a touch of smoke then this is your brew. I decided to add some cream and sugar, it is not bad, certainly more English tasting, but it takes away the some of the more subtle notes of fruit.

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2014/04/upton-tea-imports-baker-street.html

Nicole

Spend time with your peeps? Or with your Peeps (since it was Easter, after all…) :)

Amanda 'SoggyEnderman' Wilson

Hehe, the secret is out, my family is made entirely of marshmallows :P

Anna

…“a time of crafts and bunnies.” That’s the best description of Easter EVER. Also hilarious.

Amanda 'SoggyEnderman' Wilson

Thank you! I think if I ever send Easter cards I will have to use that phrase some how :P

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97

Spring time mean tea harvest for those lovely places in the world, one of those parts in the lush island of Taiwan. One of my favorite tea companies (Eco-Cha Arisan Teas) was awesome enough to keep a record of their tea production this year in a series of handy Harvest Reports and Facebook Photos. I certainly suggest checking it out of you have a passion for tea or a love of beautiful photography. Consider it a journey into the secret world of the tea leaf, experience the process it goes through from ground to cup!

Speaking of journeys to cups, today’s tea Red Jade Tea by Eco-Cha Artisan Tea, is a very fascinating red tea. Also known as Taiwan Tea No. 18, this particular tea is a hybrid of wild tea treas that grow on the mountains of Taiwan and the Assam tea plant. Created by the Tea Research Extension Station in the Sun Moon Lake region of Nantou, this tea’s hybridization gives it a natural immunity to some of the buggies that enjoy munching on tea plants. The aroma of the curly long leaves is nothing short of complex, blending rich cocoa, roasted peanuts, cloves, a bit of barley, and a woody quality. The aroma is more savory than sweet, in fact it is all savory instead of sweet, with a strong and heavy presence. This is a tea that will be noticed!

Adding the tea to the gaiwan and giving it a bath brought out some very interesting aroma notes, a strong showing from the cocoa and cloves, but also mint and cinnamon. This might be one of the more complex and unusual red teas I have experienced. The liquid’s aroma is lighter, with creamy cocoa and rich cloves, there is a finish of licorice and mint. If I could use any terms other than aroma notes to describe the way the tea smells I would say it is bold and snappy, it makes itself known and has a bright cooling affect at the same time.

With the first sip I am immediately struck by the complexity. At first there is a smooth woody and roasted nut quality with a hint of cloves. This fades to a mint and licorice midtaste that has a cooling sensation, not like actually eating or drinking mint, but the way your mouth is cooled when you switch from breathing through your nose to a deep breath through your mouth. I found it to be an incredibly refreshing sensation. The arftertaste is a tiny bit sweet and a bit like sassafras.

The second steep’s aroma is much sharper and snappy, there are still strong cocoa and clove notes, but the mint is much more prominent, as is the aroma of sassafras. The taste is rich and I would even say herbaceous but more woody herbaceous than leafy herbaceous. Think sassafras bark and roasted peanuts with hints of cloves and mint. It has a malty beginning and a malty finish. This steeping has no sweetness at all, it is all savory and rich.

The third steep’s aroma is much the same as the second, I did not notice any differences between the two. The taste however is different, it still has the same flavor notes as the previous steep, but instead of it being all savory and rich, it is milder and has a subtle sweetness. I really enjoyed this tea (but I don’t say Eco-Cha is one of my favorite companies lightly, I have loved all of their teas) and found the unusual and complex notes to be both exciting and relaxing.

For Blog, Photos, Links to Harvest Notes, and a bit of spring time: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2014/04/eco-cha-artisan-tea-red-jade-tea-tea.html

Stephanie

Sounds very nice :)

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80

Another beautiful day in the Midwest, really, spring time out here reminds me of the things that I like about this are, it turns out though that most places are pretty in spring. I have a busy weekend ahead of me: big family gathering, candied violets to make, British flapjacks to cook myself, and of course some sort of art project. I am feeling inspired to do something crafty, just not sure exactly what yet.

Today’s tea is a delightfully fuzzy green tea from Teavivre, Bi Luo Chun (or Pi Lo Chun, depending on dialect) from Mt Dongting in Jiangsu Province. The translation of this tea is Green Snail Spring, referring to the curly shape of the leaves. The aroma of the dry leaves is sweet and fresh, blending artichoke and lychee with a delicate hint of floral at the end. This tea smells like nature in springtime, bringing in the notes of fruits, flowers, and vegetation. It makes my nose happy.

Into the basket the fuzzy little leaves go for a nice bath. Sadly this means the fuzzies go away, such is the fate of tea leaves. Holy Lychee, Batman! The wet leaves are so sweet and fruity that it is nothing short of mouthwatering. There is also a touch of artichoke and hay, giving the tea a more vegetal quality at the end of the sniff. The liquid is mild with delicate notes of artichoke and sweet lychee, floating on the top of the tea are the fuzzy trichomes.

The taste is quite delicate (that seems to be the key word with this tea) with a sweet citrus taste reminiscent of lychees. There is also a very mild hint of nuts that fades to a green bean vegetal taste. Of course the trichomes tickle the inside of my mouth making me giggle when I sip the tea. This tea is very mild and refreshing, it reminds me of spring rain.

Giving the tea a second steeping (we meet again curly leaves!) and I notice the aroma of the liquid is much sweeter and heavier of lychee. The taste is also sweeter, instead of being reminiscent of lychees it actually tastes like lychees. There is also a surprising note of violets, and almost no vegetal taste. As the tea cools it gets even sweeter and floral. This tea did not really wow me in taste, but it certainly wowed me at how delicate and nuanced it is. I find this is a tea for special occasions with nuanced tasters, sadly I served it to a bunch of non-tea drinkers and they thought it had no taste. Tragic. At the time of writing these tasting notes in my tea-journal I did not yet have a gaiwan, I am curious to try this tea again with a gaiwan and see how much of a difference it makes.

For review and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2014/04/teavivre-bi-luo-chun-tea-review.html

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94

As you might have noticed, there was no blog yesterday. I was at a Passover Seder, replacing my usual tea for a bit of wine. Ben is half Jewish and very close friends of the family are Jewish, and they host a very awesome Seder every year. Of course they host other fantastic Jewish feasts, but Passover has always been a favorite, I am so glad they always think to include my Shiksa (which also means meal in Korean) self. Even going far enough to reward me a sweet five dollars (I feel rich!) for the Afikoman! I love exploring cultures that are different than mine, especially when they enjoy including ‘outsiders’ who want to learn!

Today’s blog is going to be a bit of an adventure, since I am reviewing an ingredient! Specifically Genamicha Ingredients by Yunomi.us and Yaname-en Tea Shop, made from Toasted Uruchi Rice and Tokachi Black Soybeans. Toasted Uruchi rice (or Uruchi-Mai) is a short grain polished rice that is most commonly eaten in Japan, the soybeans are from the Tokachi region of Hokkaido. I decided to mix the ingredients with three different teas (for a start, I know I will come up with more blends) giving a nice demonstration of how the rice and soybeans perform under heat.

The first blend is using Sencha of the Summer Sun, by Obubu Tea. The aroma is exactly what you expect, a nice toasted rice aroma that blends really well with the sweet and grassy aroma of the sencha. The taste is like sticky rice and popcorn with a slight bean taste that fades into the grassy sweet and slight seaweed umami taste. I noticed that adding the Genmai to the Cha that it brings out more of the sweetness from the sencha. I call this blend a success.

For the second experiment I did something I always wanted to try, Houji Genmaicha! The aroma is the wonderfully toasty roasty, blending the toasted and slightly smoky aroma of the Houjicha with the toasted rice makes the tea smell just like autumn. The taste is fantastic, I almost don’t have words other than yummy, yummy, yummy. The smoky and roasted flavors of houjicha blend perfectly with the toasted rice sweetness, there is also a hint of the soybeans which adds an earthy quality. The taste, like the aroma, is very autumnal, bringing the idea of falling leaves, distant fires, and harvest.

For the final experiment I went with Sakura Sencha. You might remember from my review of Sakura Blossom Tea that I mixed the Sakura blossoms with Genmaicha and Sencha and really liked both of them, so I deiced to mix my Sakura Sencha with Genmaicha. The result is very similar to the Sakura blended Genmaicha, slightly salty and nutty with roasted rice and a floral finish. Very much the taste of spring!

I enjoyed this little experiment with rice and tea, I can’t wait to come up with some new concoctions using this tasty roasted rice. I liked the addition of the soybeans, it added an extra nutty and earthy quality to the tea, definitely a new favorite!

For photos and blog: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2014/04/yunomius-and-yaname-en-genmaicha.html

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100

Ah, last night’s eclipse was fantastic. Other than a pretty violent fight with my tripod (I am going to need a new one very soon) and the cold, it was a spectacular showing. I celebrated with a cup of beautifully dark colored Shui Xian to reflect to color of the moon at full eclipse and took some decent photos. Now the weather is turning warm again, and that means tomorrow I am harvesting violets for candied violets. Spring is a very happy time.

Today’s tea is very much in the theme of spring time, Crane Monk Light Oolong by Temple Road is a beautiful green oolong from Shan Lin Xi, Nantou County, Taiwan. I snipped open the sample package and was immediately slammed with intense floral aroma, I am not saying it was overwhelming (because flowers make me happy) but it was incredibly intense! The aroma is an incredibly heady mix of orchids and hyacinth flowers with a sweet honeysuckle quality. The floral aroma fades to green vegetation and chestnuts, and from that we have a finish of honeyed bread. The aroma is one of the most intensely floral aromas I have experienced from an Oolong, it is fantastic, the other notes are great as well, but that floral intensity really steals the show.

I tossed my leaves into the gaiwan for a nice steeping (after what seems like an eternity of sniffing) and when I lifted the lid I was again greeted by incredible floral. Hello orchids, hyachinth, honeysuckle, and gardenia. There is a bouquet of flowers and their accompaniment of green vegetation in my gaiwan. There is also a creamy quality to the aroma that gives it a heaviness along with headiness. The liquid is very heady, primarily orchid with a hint of orange blossom and vegetation. It is one of those teas that smells like nature, and that makes me immensely happy.

For the first steep, well, give me a moment I need to come up with words that are not just a pile of inarticulate yummy noises. Sometimes I am not dignified when I am sipping a really good tea. The initial taste is incredibly sweet and floral, orangeblossoms and honeysuckles with rich leafy notes. It tastes like what a conservatory smells like, blending flowers, vegetation, and a heavy warmth that makes you never want to leave. The mouthfeel is buttery smooth and thick, I think I could get lost in this tea.

Second steep time! The aroma is still intensely sweet and heady, also creamy and freshly green. I really enjoy how complex the aroma of the liquid is. FLAVOR MOUTH EXPLOSION! So much intensity, no longer articulate at all. Ben, had to come see what the maniacal laughter was about since I was enjoying myself so much I turned into a super-villain. The intense floral flavor from the previous steep remains, the vegetation (the website decribes it as alpine, a term which I love and agree with!) taste is much stronger, and it is joined with a nice juicy pear. The mouthfeel is still very creamy, a pleasant surprise! Usually with oolongs that have a strong green presence I find the mouthfeel to be sharper, so this is quite unique.

Ok, try to regain some composure for steep number three, because you all know I couldn’t stop there. The aroma has calmed a bit, still intense orchid and gardenia with a bit of vegetation. The taste this time is more vegetal and green, a bit of spinach and sage with copious amounts of fresh vegetation. This flows to a delicate sweet floral, it is not as sweet as the previous steep, but the subtle sweetness lingers and is refreshing. Well, Temple Road, you have blown my mind with yet another tea, well done!

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2014/04/temple-road-tea-crane-monk-light-oolong.html

__Morgana__

I kept hearing about the eclipse on the local classical radio station while driving to and from work, but I then totally forgot about it. This reminds me to go look for some photos.

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Bio

I am a nerdy, obsessive, crafty, tea blogging, gaming nut. Yeah, that about sums me up! Ok, you want something more informative….

I am a Geek, hardcore fan-girl Geek. It shapes my life. I spend a lot of time making things out of perler beads and I bet you can guess what inspires them. Other than the obsessive pixelizing of things I spend a large portion of my time doing origami (especially Lucky Stars and modular geometric designs) it is an equal obsession. I hoard dice, get obsessed with games, and will talk about whatever fandom, game, etc that I am obsessed over until I am blue in the face. I am not just a gamer girl type Geek, I also fit in the collecting knowledge and spending way too much time reading, category of Geek.

But there is more to me than just being a giant nerd. I love tea, always have and have just gotten more and more obsessed as I get older. I love trying new teas and then writing lengthy descriptions about them on my blog, I love reading and researching the history and culture of tea, I love collecting tea pots and fancy tea tools.

When the weather allows it, I love to go mushroom hunting. I don’t eat them, instead I use them for photography and spore prints. It is my dream to one day become a Mycologist studying slime molds.

I have Fibromyalgia, it sucks, but I feel people who are going to interact with me should know since I tend to vanish because of it. So fair warning!!

I also have cats, love the ocean and all aquatic life, love cheese, and collect hats.

My favorite tea is definitely Oolong, but I also love Japanese greens and…ok I just love tea actually :P I am not a huge fan of lemony teas or tart fruit teas. I also loathe hibiscus (usually)

This is my actual tea wishlist, you know that I actually update and keep track of…I tend to forget Steepster’s https://www.facebook.com/notes/amanda-wilson/tea-wishlishtshopping-list-perpetually-in-progress/10152336515414411 I use my steepster WL to keep track of teas I have had and really want more of :P

Location

Kansas City, MO

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http://ramblingbutterflythoug...

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