667 Tasting Notes


As I type this I can say I am feeling some improvement, I am certainly not back to ‘normal’ but I am getting there. Also as I type this there is a massive storm raging outside, power keeps flickering on and off, and the wind is howling. This could be the last storm I experience this year, it makes me a little sad since storms are my favorite kind of weather to experience. If I am lucky I will get to have some snow storms while I am visiting Pennsylvania.

Since it is Wednesday, that means it is time for a tea from What-Cha! Nepal 2nd Flush 2014 Sencha Green Tea is a fascinating green tea from Greenland Organic Farms in Nepal, and I admit, I had some confusion on what to do with this tea. Did I want to brew it like a Japanese Sencha in my Kyusu, Western Style in a teacup, or like a Chinese green in a gaiwan, not gonna lie, I sat for a few minutes with tea gear paralysis trying to decide what method to go with. I realizes my Kyusu was practically pouting from neglect so I decided to brew it Japanese style. While I was trying to decide, I spent this time admiring the shape and color of the leaves, they are beautiful, looking like a pile of pine needles on my tea dish, very impressive. The aroma of the needles is as beautiful as the leaves, very light and delicate with notes of chestnuts, fresh hay, mown grass, and an ocean breeze. I have such a weakness for teas that have a marine note to their taste or aroma, it instantly transports me to the beach and that makes me immensely happy. I think I am just going to sniff these leaves while I wait for my kettle to heat up.

Oh man, steeping the leaves makes the aroma so green! Like a delicious pile of grass, spinach, and kelp with a strong sea water note wafting out of the now warmed and soggy leaves. It has a great savory umami quality to it. The liquid is incredibly mild, with clean water and algae notes, it reminds me of the aroma of a clean mountain creek with vibrantly green algae growing in it.

The first steeping is very light! It tastes refreshing and clean, starting with a sea air and algae note and fading to grass and kelp at the middle. The end is a lingering taste of spinach, giving the whole tea a great mildly savory tone, good for people who only want a little umami.

As predicted I went for another steep, the aroma is a mix of green grass and kelp with a tiny hint of sweet nuttiness at the finish. The taste is very similar to the first, but instead of being delicate it has strength, like a refreshing sea air viking…ok, not like that, but you get the picture (I hope.) Leaving this tea to sit and chill (totally by accident, I fell asleep in my chair for about half an hour, happens to the best of us) I noticed it had an incredible sweetness at the finish of fresh chestnuts. This gave me an idea.

Cold Steeping Time! I really do not cold steep enough, I wanted to go all out this time and so I left my tea to cold steep in the fridge for a whopping 20 hours. The first thing I noticed when taking a sip was it had no taste, after realizing I was being kinda dumb (it was first thing in the morning) I shook it up and took another sip, ok that is some flavor! It is richly green and refreshing, like dew drops off of freshly cut grass mixed with kelp. Add in a nutty, yet surprisingly unsweet finish, and you have a delicious tea. I think my cold steep method might need some work still, since I bet if I steeped it for a shorter time it would be sweeter, or that could just be a product of chilling already brewed tea. Either way, this Sencha from Nepal was what I needed to clear my head on a hot autumn day.

For review and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2014/10/what-cha-nepal-2nd-flush-2014-sencha.html


oh man, I hate tea gear paralysis.

Amanda 'SoggyEnderman' Wilson

It is probably the only bad thing about having a bunch of cool tea gear :P (ok maybe trying to find a place to keep it all too)


I still have a homeless tea tray that I don’t know what to do with . It’s a bad size for everywhere I have tried.

Amanda 'SoggyEnderman' Wilson

I fear this might happen to me as well, my mom got me a glorious teak wood tray and I know when I bring it home after my visit, trying to find a home for it will be a challenge.


Mine is currently awkwardly living on the kitchen counter. I can’t turn it on it’s side unless I tape the removable piece down which I’m afraid will ruin the wood.

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I am using this tasting note for two purposes, ooooh. If you just follow me here and don’t read my tea blog, be warned, I am either unwell or not adjusting to my meds being upped, suitably so that concentrating is just not happening. My reviews would be terrible, so I am taking a couple days off to recuperate/adjust to my meds.

Anyway, tea! The aroma of the dried leaves is nice and sweet, honeysuckle nectar and orchids with a bit of a sweet yeasty smell. Mmm the brewed leaves and the tea smell super heady and sweet, with mainly honeysuckles and orchids, there is a little hint of stems and yeasty bread as well.

The taste is sweet and green, with floral notes that linger. Yum, AliShan never is disappointing.


I hope you feel better soon. Med changes are never fun until they settle.

Amanda 'SoggyEnderman' Wilson

Thank you! I hope so too, this crushing fatigue is so annoying D:


Just found your blog-site! Love all the pictures: Steepster needs to be able to add pictures to posts.

Amanda 'SoggyEnderman' Wilson

Thank you :) And I totally agree, it would make things so much cooler! People are all the talking about cool things in their notes, I want to seee them!

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Today’s bit of tea book goodness is Top 100 Tea Recipes by Mary Ward, a collection of recipes that for once is not just food made with tea! A lot of tea books I have read that include recipes focus on food rather than interesting drink concoctions, which is sad because you can get a lot of interesting drinks by blending tea with all sorts of things. I will start by saying the writer’s style is quite…archaic? I am not really sure how to describe her ‘voice’ in this book, but it reminds me of reading older books or ones that have been translated in a more formal tone. This is not a complaint, I actually am rather fond of this style.

So, the book is sorted into different kind of recipes, that is, once you get past the standard first few chapters introducing tea. It starts with a brief history of tea, starting in the Hsia (Xia) period in China, though it does not mention Shennong, instead only Emperor Yu is mentioned. This transitions to how tea is grown, processed, and graded, along with a brief blurb on different types of tea. It is very basic, but a decent starter/refresher chapter. The next chapter is about how to prepare tea, written by Daniel Mantey, it has a good deal of information about tea preparation, additives, and some more history on tea that is just a tiny bit redundant while also being more detailed. Points for saying teaballs should be illegal, it is really a shame how cramped the poor leaves get inside those things. I think they are fine for tiny chopped up leaves or herbals that do not really expand, but there is also the concern of water flow, the mesh teaballs being the best.

Chapter three begins the actual recipes, starting with hot teas! Some of them are tasty blends like mulled tea, and others are teas specific to different cultures, like Billy tea, popcorn tea (genmai cha), German Layered Tea (Ostfriesen Tea) and so forth. I found it a bit sad that the book used more generic names than the actual names for some of the teas. There are also herbal teas in this chapter, most of which look tasty and have easy to acquire ingredients.

Moving on to chapter four we have iced teas! Ah, iced teas, the ambrosia of my childhood and early adult summers, well that and ambrosia salad, living in the South was tasty. One of the recipes made me do a double take, Iced Soda Tea, essentially mixing a rootbeer or other soda float in a blender and then mixing cold tea with it, that sounds incredibly yummy.

Next we have boozy teas, I admit I only skimmed this chapter since my medication makes me unable to drink, and why tempt myself with yummy concoctions? After that is tea and food, yum, starting with Japanese food to go with a Japanese tea ceremony, this moves on to English tea, children’s nursery tea and afternoon tea. The book finished off with yummy (not tea themed) treats to go with tea, most of them look very delicious. I like this book, I copied a lot of the recipes to my cookbook and plan on using them at some point.

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2014/09/top-100-tea-recipes-tea-book-review.html


I may have to see if I can find this one. Thanks!

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The last couple days have been crazy hectic for me, but also really fun! Since I am leaving in a few weeks I am tying up loose ends and visiting with people who I won’t see for months. Of course I also had my fun at game night, joining a space themed goofy RPG campaign, which in hindsight might have been silly since I will be gone, though they said I can just ‘be on leave’ and if the campaign is still ongoing I can jump back in as ship scientist. Typing this I realize I am utterly tea drunk after a fun afternoon of trying tea with one of my friends, tea drunk is a wonderful state to be in.

Today’s tea is from Eco-Cha Artisan Teas, Charcoal Roasted Dong Ding, specifically the 2014 harvest. Grown at 700m on a small farm in Phoenix Village, free from chemicals and painstakingly roasted in a traditional tea roasting oven. As with all of Eco-Cha’s teas I suggest reading the origin of this tea on the website, it is wonderful knowing about the tea and the people who create it. As readers of this blog probably know, I have an addiction to roasted oolongs, Dong Ding with a charcoal persuasion being my favorite, it is my go to comfort tea that always puts me in a better state of mind and body when drinking it. The aroma of the dry leaves is delightfully rich, a blend of tobacco, bamboo coal, wood, earthiness, and a delightfully sweet sesame butter and honey finish. You can tell this tea was created by those who are very proficient in their art because it has the charcoal notes you expect, but they are mellow and it is not a kick to the face with a boot full of coal.

The brewed leaves are great, it is like a gaiwan full of autumn memories! There are notes of smoke, bamboo coal, a touch of honey, a tiny hint of dried orchids, and a sharp finish of tobacco. The aroma of the liquid starts off mild, it will gain intensity as the leaves unfurl. It is sweet with notes of squash, bamboo, sesame seeds, and charcoal.

As I take my first steep you can hear me sigh with relief, well if you were in the same room as me you would hear it. The taste is mild, it starts off with creamy sesame butter and orchids with a touch of tobacco, this transitions to bamboo coal and dried fruit giving the first steep a sweet finish. The mouthfeel starts smooth and transitions to a slight dryness.

And on to the second steep we go, you know me, I can never stop at just one. The aroma of the liquid is a blend of tobacco, coal, bamboo, and toasted pine nuts with an underlying sweetness that ties all the notes together. Once I finally manage to pull my nose out of the teacup (a hard task) and take a sip, I notice the mouthfeel has a sparkling quality, it does not bubble or feel like a soda, but it has that tingly dryness I associate with fizz, it is quite subtle but enjoyable. The taste is sweet, like plums that have been roasted over hot coals and then sprinkled with a bit of floral spice. This transitions to toasted sesame seeds and a touch of pine nuts with a smoky finish.

The aroma of the third steep is gently smoky and sweet with notes of bamboo, pine nuts, and honey. It blends sweetness, smoke, and nuttiness very well. The taste starts out with sharp notes of coal and tobacco and quickly mellow out to mild coal, bamboo and sweetness. This steep is certainly the most coal filled so far, it is mostly smoky until the finish where the aftertaste is delicately fruity.

Onward to the fourth steeping! The aroma is a mellow blend of coal, bamboo, pine nuts, and a bit of tobacco, there is no sweetness here. The taste is strong, almost entirely coal and tobacco, the mouthfeel is dry and sharp. The fun thing is when I move on to the fifth steeping, the aroma is yeasty bread and only a hint of coal. The taste is mild with a touch of bamboo and minerals with a delicate sweet finish. This tea is an experience that should not be missed, especially if you are a fan of charcoal roasted teas, the essence of this tea is balance, it keeps the coal notes balanced with the others as it grows in intensity.

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2014/09/eco-cha-artisan-teas-charcoal-roasted.html


I have some of this, but I haven’t ventured into it yet. I definitely will soon!

Amanda 'SoggyEnderman' Wilson

ooh I cannot wait to see what you think!

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I have a slight conundrum, earlier in the week I decided to paint a Cthulhu (yes it will show up in my tea reviews alongside my tea frog and Prowlers) and I am so pleased with it. I might add some slime to his raggedy wings and tentacles, but if I left it untouched as it is now, I would be content. Problem is, this is the first of the miniatures I have painted that I consider finished, and now I am for some reason terrified to work on any of the other ones. It is silly, I am so convinced that I am going to screw them up, that all my creative talent went into my Eldritch Horror…I am sure it will pass in a day or so, but it is a very odd feeling. Any other artists ever have that feeling when they complete something?

Today’s tea for What-Cha Wednesday is Nepal 1st Flush 2014 Silver Oolong, silver oolong just sounds pretty, like the oolong is made of moonlight or something incredibly whimsical. Grown at Greenland Organic Farm in Nepal, near Mt Kancghenjunga at an altitude of 3,000m, looking at the photo of the farm on What-Cha’s page for this tea, perhaps this oolong is made from snow, clouds, and silvery mist. I find myself pleased to try more teas from Nepal, expanding my tea education is a joy! The aroma of these fluffy and silvery leaves is summed up as light, with notes of orange blossoms, cane sugar, a touch of undefined flowers, and a tiny hint of herbaceous green. It is like a blend of white tea, oolong, and delicate green tea, when I say that it is light, the aroma itself is very defined and has a presence, just the notes themselves are very light and airy.

Into the gaiwan it goes! I felt bad for my first gaiwan, poor chipped thing has been mostly replaced by my auspicious bat gaiwan, so I decided to give it some love, plus the delicate white porcelain seemed perfect for such a delicate seeming oolong. The aroma of the now steeped leaves is a mix of orange blossom, sage, and lettuce, again with a distant hint of floral. The liquid is very similar to the brewed leaves, except there is more of a green, fresh vegetation aroma that accompanies the flowers. I am especially fond of of the orange blossom aroma, I do not run into that very often.

The first steeping is delightfully light and clean tasting, with a start of cane sugar and orange blossoms, this transitions to fresh vegetation and steam. Ok, steam, yeah that sounds weird, but have you ever been in a conservatory or greenhouse that is steamy and it is that mix of flowers, growing things, and water that you can taste when breathing through your mouth? That kind of steam, it is quite evocative and refreshing. This steeping reminds me of white tea, oolong, and green tea took their most delicate and mellow notes and combined them into this cup.

For the second steep the aroma is very sweet, like orange blossoms and orange zest, after that it fades to fresh vegetation. The taste of this steep has a definite boost of body in comparison to the first, it starts a bit dry and sharp with a definite taste of fresh spring water, complete with minerals. This transitions to a mix of spring water and orange blossoms, with a tiny hint of kale. At the finish you get a sweet burst of orange and cane sugar that lingers for quite a while. Like the previous Nepalese oolong, I feel clean and refreshed after sipping this tea.

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2014/09/what-cha-nepal-1st-flush-2014-silver.html

Flavors: Floral, Green, Mineral, Orange Blossom, Orange Zest

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Happy first day of Autumn (or spring if you are in the other side of the world from me) everyone! This is my favorite season, by far, I love the leaves and crisp feeling in the air, the excuse to break out my fuzzy blankets and the way the world smells. It just makes me happy, doubly so this year because I will be back in the mountains during peak leaf season, though three months away from Ben and my cats is going to be rough.

I wanted to start the season off with a tea that makes me think of campfires and happy memories, so I chose S’mores! by Whispering Pines Tea Co. This tea is a blend of Fujian Black Tea, Pine Peaks Keemun, Ashes of Autumn Black Tea, Organic Cinnamon Pieces, and Organic Marshmallow Root, mad props for using marshmallow root, too few marshmallow themed things use the root of the mallow, which is sad because it is extremely tasty. The dry leaves smell like an autumn evening sitting next to a crackling fire while eating s’mores! There are notes of smoke, cinnamon, marshmallow sweetness, and a finish of rich cocoa. The leaves smell quite rich and not overwhelmingly sweet, just the way I like my desserts!

Giving the tea a nice steeping, I notice that the wet leaves have a really nice malt note that goes well with the cocoa, marshmallow, and cinnamon notes. The smoke is still there, but it no longer smells like I am sitting next to the campfire, clearly I have wandered off with my s’more. The liquid, oh my, that is very rich! Creamy chocolate, gentle cinnamon warmth, far away smoke, and marshmallow sweetness combine for a nose dance of epic yum. I may have moaned a bit while sniffing this tea, the cats looked at me like I was crazy, their loss.

OMG guys, this tea is too good! It hits that perfect balance of sweet and rich, warming and smoky, and oh so evocative. I can feel the warmth of the campfire from the cinnamon, the smoke of the fire from the Ashes of Autumn tea, and of course the rich cocoa notes and marshmallow root with a nice finish of malt. I like that it is not overly sweet, so it is good on its own or with a dessert as an extra rich treat. My favorite thing about this tea is how evocative it is, I love that it transports me to a place in my memories that makes me happy, really homesick, but happy. But wait, what about graham crackers? I admit the taste of the crackers is not really strong, the malt notes give the ‘essence’ so to speak of graham crackers, but it is not as clear as having the crackers. I am tempted to find some gluten free graham crackers to eat while sipping this tea for extra perfection.

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2014/09/whispering-pines-tea-co-smores-tea.html

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Mmm the aroma is so creamy sweet and yummy with notes of dried fruit, cocoa, and roasted peanuts. Ok, that is the aroma of the liquid, sadly the dry leaves had not much in the way of a smell.

The first steep is smooth and very sweet, having a cherry and plum sweetness along with honey and a bit of sweet potato. The second steep is still very smooth and sweet, maintaining the fruity notes but also adding a touch of cocoa. Yum, just what I needed this morning.

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Marco Polo TTB

Yuck, yuck, yuck, I have no motivation to do anything today. I feel as though my brain and body is trapped inside a Slime and that Slime is too lazy to move, the fatigue is real, yo. Me thinks after I write this tea’s review I shall make like a pile of leaves and take a nice long soak in hot water. Preferably while reading a book, maybe I will bring some tea to sip as well, just submit myself to complete relaxation. Ah memories, when I was a kid, the most decadent thing I could think to do was to take a hot bath while eating ice cream, especially if it was pistachio ice cream, if you have not tried eating ice cream while soaking I most certainly recommend it.

Today we are taking a look at Mahamosa Gourmet Teas, Spices & Herbs Caramel, an herbal dessert tea. A blend of Rooibos, Cream Caramel Pieces, Brittle (specifically hazelnut) pieces, and Flavoring, this tea sounds like a real sweet treat. The aroma of the dry leaves certainly has me believing that it will be a sweet treat, with notes of caramel, sweet nuttiness, and woody, slightly sour, rooibos as a base. It is very sweet, the caramel plays well off the naturally caramel notes of the rooibos.

Steeping the tea leaves fills my room with an intense sweetness. The little red leaves smell woody and sweet with notes of caramel, nuttiness, and a bit like a caramel latte, complete with coffee. The liquid is creamy and sweet with very strong notes of caramel, it smells like candy and richness.

Tasting time, luckily for me I am having a sweetness craving, so if this tea tastes as sweet as it smells I will be in a very happy place. The sipping starts off sweet and woody, like a typically sweet, woody, and dry rooibos with an extra caramel coating. This turns into a creamy midtaste and toasted nuttiness that gives it that bit of a latte flair. The finish is dry and woody, just like I expect from a rooibos, the tea was not cloyingly sweet like a mouthful of caramel, but it is quite sweet so it certainly fits its goal of being a dessert tea. Plus you can sip it before sleep thanks to it not having caffeine!

For Blog and Photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2014/09/mahamosa-gourmet-teas-spices-herbs.html

Flavors: Caramel, Coffee, Nuts, Wood


Trapped inside a Slime. That is a perfect description. :)


The beginning of your note is very mis-leading since you liked the tea, lol,

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I feel icky, that means I need a Roasted Oolong to sooth me soul, instead of reaching for a favorite I decided to try something new. The aroma of the leaves is very roasted, notes of tobacco and burnt toast with a tiny hint of burnt sugar. The brewed tea is very roasted, charcoal, tobacco, and burnt toast notes, no notes of sweetness. The liquid is charcoal and tobacco, this is going to be one potent tea!

There is a slight fruity sweetness I was not expecting, by fruity I mean pumpkin…are pumpkins fruit? The taste is a mix of pumpkin and coal, it is unlike any roasted Dong Ding I have ever had…it manages to be unusual and somewhat plain.

Ah, the second steep brings a more nuanced aroma of not so burnt toast, spicebush, and a bit of roasted grain. The taste is pretty bland, notes of pumpkin, charcoal, and spicebush, it is a soothing kinda bland though.

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My Rating Guide, This is a personal rating and not necessarily a reflection of the tea’s quality
100-Must have on hand, it is one of my favorite teas
85-99-Really good teas, like exquisitely good
65-84-Not bad, they can be good but generic, or just teas that I found enjoyably ok.
40-64-Not a favorite, but not terrible. I would drink it if it was in front of me but I doubt I would seek it out on my own.
20-40-Not the best tea ever, either it was not to my liking or it was really bland. Chances are I would turn this one down unless I was really thirsty.
0-19-No, just no. Either there was something wrong with this tea or it was utterly undrinkable by me.

I am a nerdy, obsessive, crafty, tea blogging, gaming nut. Yeah, that about sums me up! Ok, you want something more informative….

I am a Geek, hardcore fan-girl Geek. It shapes my life. I spend a large chunk of my life painting miniatures and contemplating my various army layouts. I hoard dice, get obsessed with games, and will talk about whatever fandom, game, etc that I am obsessed over until I am blue in the face. I am not just a gamer girl type Geek, I also fit in the collecting knowledge and spending way too much time reading and researching category of Geek.

But there is more to me than just being a giant nerd. I love tea, always have and have just gotten more and more obsessed as I get older. I love trying new teas and then writing lengthy descriptions about them on my blog, I love reading and researching the history and culture of tea, I love collecting tea pots and fancy tea tools.

When the weather allows it, I love to go mushroom hunting. I don’t eat them, instead I use them for photography and spore prints. I love nature and worked as a Naturalist in the Northwoods one summer, it might have been the best job ever.

I have Fibromyalgia, it sucks, but I feel people who are going to interact with me should know since I tend to vanish because of it so fair warning! I do tend to not vanish very long though. Also I have some ‘social disorders’ which basically translates to I am really awkward and bad at socializing, so forgive any lack of social graces.

I also have cats, love the ocean and all aquatic life, love cheese, and collect hats.

My favorite tea is definitely Oolong, but I also love Japanese greens and…ok I just love tea actually :P I am not a huge fan of lemony black teas or tart fruit teas. I also loathe hibiscus (usually)

This is my actual tea wishlist, you know that I actually update and keep track of…I tend to forget Steepster’s https://www.facebook.com/notes/amanda-wilson/tea-wishlishtshopping-list-perpetually-in-progress/10152336515414411 I use my steepster WL to keep track of teas I have had and really want more of :P


Kansas City, MO



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