This afternoon when I got home from my gig, I wanted shu. Plain & simple.
I have a sample of this from Garret, actually I have 2 samples, so it was time to give it a try. I used a Tbl of nuggets, in an 12 oz mug. I gave it a rinse, then a 3 minute steep, with a 5 minutes resteep.

Initially, it was kind of musty, but it had an earthy grounding element, a deep flavor, and a rich & almost buttery kind of mouth.
That’s all I have for now. :)

Garret

Hi Terri!! Interesting that you got the “musty” note… This tea was quite moderate in fermentation which can smell more like old leatherbound books sometimes. Perhaps that is what you were picking up on.

As far as tea nugget – in China I learned that 3 rinses with full rolling boil is essential. The nuggets (and this one especially) are very tightly compressed under the heat, humidity, pressure that occurs in the pile fermentation. I typically steep this one after the rinses for a 1 to 2 minutes at a pop, unless I am looking for something a bit bolder, then I steep longer and do fewer steeps.

This one never reaches the “in your face” level without using lots of leaf and super boiling water. It is a more mellow ripe tea experience. I had alot of bricks of this pressed and am about to put them on a blowout sale because we need to move some inventory to make room for all the other teas coming this way!!

Thanks for writing this up!

Grateful,
Garret

Terri HarpLady

Thanks Garret!
Just for the record, I don’t want you to think I didn’t enjoy it! When I think of ‘musty’, in my mind that is old dry books in a library, kind of ancient feeling. Very different from, let’s say, a moldy or mushroomy smell, for instance. ‘Earthy’, for me, brings up imaged of well aged compost, being layered onto the beds in my garden in the spring, with all the fresh aroma of fertile earth. ‘Grounding’ usually implies an earthy bassnote. These are all good things, for me, as a gardener, to describe. I have enough to sample it again, & will probably try your suggestions the next time. :) Enjoy the day! Thanks always for the tea, the trivia, & the happiness! :)

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Garret

Hi Terri!! Interesting that you got the “musty” note… This tea was quite moderate in fermentation which can smell more like old leatherbound books sometimes. Perhaps that is what you were picking up on.

As far as tea nugget – in China I learned that 3 rinses with full rolling boil is essential. The nuggets (and this one especially) are very tightly compressed under the heat, humidity, pressure that occurs in the pile fermentation. I typically steep this one after the rinses for a 1 to 2 minutes at a pop, unless I am looking for something a bit bolder, then I steep longer and do fewer steeps.

This one never reaches the “in your face” level without using lots of leaf and super boiling water. It is a more mellow ripe tea experience. I had alot of bricks of this pressed and am about to put them on a blowout sale because we need to move some inventory to make room for all the other teas coming this way!!

Thanks for writing this up!

Grateful,
Garret

Terri HarpLady

Thanks Garret!
Just for the record, I don’t want you to think I didn’t enjoy it! When I think of ‘musty’, in my mind that is old dry books in a library, kind of ancient feeling. Very different from, let’s say, a moldy or mushroomy smell, for instance. ‘Earthy’, for me, brings up imaged of well aged compost, being layered onto the beds in my garden in the spring, with all the fresh aroma of fertile earth. ‘Grounding’ usually implies an earthy bassnote. These are all good things, for me, as a gardener, to describe. I have enough to sample it again, & will probably try your suggestions the next time. :) Enjoy the day! Thanks always for the tea, the trivia, & the happiness! :)

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Bio

I’m so excited to have found this community! I’m a self-employed Harpist (acoustic & electric – Originals, Classical, Rock, Jazz, etc) & Singer/Songwriter. My days & nights revolve around teaching at home, playing gigs, gardening,& fixing awesome food to eat. My schedule is different everyday, but I just go with the flow, & I sip a lot of tea!

My love of Tea began with Herbals back in the 70’s. One of my favorites was a licorice blend from House of Hezekiah, an old tea shop in Kansas City. There was also a tea with mint, rose petals, chamomile, etc called Nuclear Casual Tea.
In the 80’s I gave up caffeine, chocolate, alcohol, (& a few illicit substances…), and brewed medicinal blends & tinctures to support 4 pregnancies (all children born at home). In the 90’s my love affair with green teas began when I discovered ‘The Republic of Tea’. Their beautiful teas & packaging inspired my original song, “TeaMind”, from my CD “Zen Breakfast”. If you’d like to hear the song for free, drop by my website.

In general, I drink my teas straight, but occasionally I add a pinch of Stevia & maybe some coconut or almond milk (I’m allergic to dairy, gluten, & various other things & avoid most sweets.)

I’ve explored a variety of teas:
Whites tend to be a little bland…sorry
Oolongs – wonderfully sensual
Roobios – I’m not a fan in general
Puehr – a fairly new direction for me
I’m not a huge fan of flavored teas, but I do make exceptions, & I’ll try just about anything once.

And Black Tea, Oh how I love thee!!
I am on a quest for the most wonderful breakfast cup! I will find you, my Love!

Location

St. Louis, MO

Website

http://www.harpsinger.net

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