82
drank Sencha by Harney & Sons
953 tasting notes

I’m not sure who coined the term “sip down” but it’s kinda cute. ;-) Go missing from Steepster for a while and a whole new language gets invented. Wow.

I’m on a bit of a sip down quest myself, having found a number of rather old open samples, boxes, tins, bags, etc. and this is among those. I steeped this in the Breville for 1 minute at 180, which is what was recommended on the sample packet.

For a hoary sample, this has retained a really nice, light, slightly vegetal taste, though looking at my notes from the original tasting it’s clear that this is one best drunk fresh. I can’t discern the complexity that was present when the sample was young.

On another note, I wanted to ask those of you who like Japanese greens whether you have any concerns following the nuclear meltdown. I’m one of those people who hasn’t eaten sushi (much) ever since, and I’ve been taking comfort in the fact that though my Japanese greens are well past their best by dates, they were all harvested pre melt down.

Thoughts?

JustJames

ooh, hadn’t thought of that, honestly. i had a brief look through wikipedia at your question and found this: ’ As of July 2011, the Japanese government was unable to control the spread of radioactive material into the nation’s food supply. Radioactive material was detected in food produced in 2011, including spinach, tea leaves, milk, fish and beef, up to 200 miles from the plant. 2012 crops did not show signs of radioactivity contamination. Cabbage, rice119 and beef showed insignificant raditaion levels. A Fukushima-produced rice market in Tokyo was accepted by consumers as safe.119’ however, it’s hard to know whether tea that was contaminated was/would have been released for sale. i would guess not. ….. i would hope not.

__Morgana__

Thanks James! I’ll go read the article. I don’t mean to be alarmist, but I didn’t think it was strange how news coverage of the reactor accident sort of dropped off, as far as I know without any sort of resolution to the problem.

__Morgana__

Er, did think it was strange.

JustJames

i know the radioactivity is increasing as opposed to decreasing in detectibility, at least on the west coast. i think the government figures if they stop the flow of info that we will ‘keep calm and carry on’. (they forgot about the interweb)

this is the link to the article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fukushima_Daiichi_nuclear_disaster

i know japanese customs was pretty strict. the country starved for the better part of…. 18 months? because they either were not allowed to export items, or their items were not accepted.

__Morgana__

Thanks for the link!

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JustJames

ooh, hadn’t thought of that, honestly. i had a brief look through wikipedia at your question and found this: ’ As of July 2011, the Japanese government was unable to control the spread of radioactive material into the nation’s food supply. Radioactive material was detected in food produced in 2011, including spinach, tea leaves, milk, fish and beef, up to 200 miles from the plant. 2012 crops did not show signs of radioactivity contamination. Cabbage, rice119 and beef showed insignificant raditaion levels. A Fukushima-produced rice market in Tokyo was accepted by consumers as safe.119’ however, it’s hard to know whether tea that was contaminated was/would have been released for sale. i would guess not. ….. i would hope not.

__Morgana__

Thanks James! I’ll go read the article. I don’t mean to be alarmist, but I didn’t think it was strange how news coverage of the reactor accident sort of dropped off, as far as I know without any sort of resolution to the problem.

__Morgana__

Er, did think it was strange.

JustJames

i know the radioactivity is increasing as opposed to decreasing in detectibility, at least on the west coast. i think the government figures if they stop the flow of info that we will ‘keep calm and carry on’. (they forgot about the interweb)

this is the link to the article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fukushima_Daiichi_nuclear_disaster

i know japanese customs was pretty strict. the country starved for the better part of…. 18 months? because they either were not allowed to export items, or their items were not accepted.

__Morgana__

Thanks for the link!

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

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Bio

I’ve updated this bio as it’s been a couple of years since I “started getting into” tea. It’s now more accurate to say that I was obsessed with tea for a while, then other things intruded, then I cycled back to it, and I seem to be continuing that in for a while, out for a while cycle. I have a short attention span, but no shortage of tea.

I’m a mom, writer, gamer, lawyer, reader, runner, traveler, and enjoyer of life, literature, art, music, thought and kindness, in no particular order. I’ve recently started writing fantasy and science fiction under the name J. J. Roth.

Personal biases: I much prefer to drink tea without additives such as milk and sugar. If a tea needs additives to improve its flavor, its unlikely I’m going to rate it high. The exception is chai, which I make on the stove top using a recipe I found here on Steepster. Rooibos and honeybush were my gateway drugs into the harder stuff, but once I learned how to make a decent cup of tea they became far less appealing to me. That said, I’m not entirely a purist, and I enjoy a good flavored tea, particularly flavored blacks.

I like all kinds of tea depending on time of day, mood, and the amount of time I have to pay attention to preparation.

Since I find others’ rating legends helpful, I added my own. I’m revising them slightly to make them less granular as I don’t really find myself hating most things I try.

I try to rate teas against other similar versions. So I rate Earl Greys, for example, against other Earl Greys, rather than against all teas. If something rates very high with me, though, it probably means it’s a stand out against all other teas I’ve tried.

95-100 A once in a lifetime experience; the best there is; will keep this stocked until the cows come home

90-94 First rate; top notch; really terrific; will definitely buy more

80-89 Excellent; likely to become a favorite, will likely buy more

70-79 Very good; would enjoy again, might buy again if in the mood for this particular one or a better, similar version not available

60-69 Good; wouldn’t pass up if offered, but probably wouldn’t buy again unless craving this particular flavor

50-59 Okay or run of the mill

Below 50 So-so, iffy, would definitely pass
or ick. The lower the number, the closer to ick.

Location

Bay Area, California

Website

http://www.jjroth.net

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