Hide

Welcome to Steepster, an online tea community.

Write a tea journal, see what others are drinking and get recommendations from people you trust. or Learn More

92

I am the worst. I keep buying tea and not drinking it because I’m still afraid of screwing up and wasting tea, like hoarding it and letting it go stale is so much better.

Well not anymore! I finally cracked into this pouch and I’m glad I did! I wasn’t sure how I’d take to this one, as it’s supposed to be similar to dragonwell and I haven’t been too impressed with the dragonwells I’ve tried thus far, but I was not disappointed. It’s a little sweet, a little savory, with a light dryness at the end of the sip. It’s quite moreish, as they say here in UKland – I keep grabbing the cup for another mouthful as soon as I’m finished with the preceding one. Yummy!

Preparation
160 °F / 71 °C 1 min, 0 sec
Garret

Yes! I am so happy that you are enjoying this one. I had been looking to come up with a tea in order to satisfy my (and that of my customers) desire for a dragonwell tea. People have asked why I don’t source the famous Dragonwell tea. It is because I have been to the area where it is grown and will not buy teas from that area. When I was there, I could not breathe due to the smog from the factory cities that have sprung up around there in the last bunch of years. Even if the tea is grown without sprays, the air they bathe in day and night is tainted and that will alter the tea greatly. No thanks.

So I found this tea on one of my trips and it turns out it is the ancestor to the dragonwell tea. I am happy to have found it. The area this Valley Peak is grown in is so lovely and fresh and the tea itself is grown without sprays. This is as clean as it gets.

The whole experience of being in tea growing areas that were inundated with air pollution turned out to be a good thing. It led me to really investigate the various growing areas in order to get teas for me and my customers that are grown cleanly. China is a HUGE country and there are still many many areas that are pristine in their growing conditions.

I really appreciate you taking the time to write up your take on this one. Thank you.

With gratitude,
Garret

adagio breeze

It’s no trouble at all. Thank you for leaving such an informative comment!

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

People who liked this

Comments

Garret

Yes! I am so happy that you are enjoying this one. I had been looking to come up with a tea in order to satisfy my (and that of my customers) desire for a dragonwell tea. People have asked why I don’t source the famous Dragonwell tea. It is because I have been to the area where it is grown and will not buy teas from that area. When I was there, I could not breathe due to the smog from the factory cities that have sprung up around there in the last bunch of years. Even if the tea is grown without sprays, the air they bathe in day and night is tainted and that will alter the tea greatly. No thanks.

So I found this tea on one of my trips and it turns out it is the ancestor to the dragonwell tea. I am happy to have found it. The area this Valley Peak is grown in is so lovely and fresh and the tea itself is grown without sprays. This is as clean as it gets.

The whole experience of being in tea growing areas that were inundated with air pollution turned out to be a good thing. It led me to really investigate the various growing areas in order to get teas for me and my customers that are grown cleanly. China is a HUGE country and there are still many many areas that are pristine in their growing conditions.

I really appreciate you taking the time to write up your take on this one. Thank you.

With gratitude,
Garret

adagio breeze

It’s no trouble at all. Thank you for leaving such an informative comment!

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

Profile

Bio

I grew up in New Jersey drinking Celestial Seasonings, and now I live in England, where I developed a taste for a good builder’s brew. Sometime in 2012 I bought my first loose teas, and my collection has since spiraled out of control. Still quite a novice, due to not drinking enough tea to keep pace with the amount I keep buying.

Some things I’m pretty sure I do like:
- most florals (jasmine, orange blossom, osmanthus, etc)
- buttery, vegetal greens
- malty blacks (usually with milk & sugar)
- oolongs that aren’t too heavily roasted

All tasting notes use unfiltered hard tap water, unless otherwise specified.

No real method to my numerical ratings yet, but we’ll see what develops.

Location

Bristol, UK

Following These People