92

I am trying to not let myself get sucked in to the world of expensive, gourmet tea. Seeking out cheaper alternatives is a must have. I am very impressed with this. I’m not gonna lie to you and tell you I heard angels singing or the earth moved but this is an excellent value for the price ($4.00/oz as of today’s writing).

I steeped it for 2 minutes and used near boiling water with about 2 tsb of leaf and 10 oz of water. The website said to use fairly hot water in order to bring out the flavors. Very pleasant nectarine and peach flavors are coming through here. Not a trace of bitterness at all which can sometimes be a problem with these darker oolongs. Perfect for daily drinking…

Preparation
2 min, 0 sec
Charles Thomas Draper

Lately I have heard angels. LOL

TeaBrat

I’m trying to save my angels for special occasions… :)

Charles Thomas Draper

Every second is a special occasion

Amariel

The great thing with oolongs, is that even if they cost a bit more, you can get multiple steeps, and the flavour can change the more you steep it, so it does balance out a little, cost-wise.

Jim Marks

Toasty oolongs are a great variety for finding reasonably priced stand bys for day to day cups that won’t break the bank.

Charles Thomas Draper Jim, Amy turned me on to this very informative video about the Wuyi growing region. I am sure it will answer your question concerning the Big Red Robe. As far as i know, most are clones off of the original trees….
ScottTeaMan

Ahhh…….Da Hong Pao, avery enjoyable tea.

Jim Marks

As I understand it they aren’t “clones” but are grown from clippings, the same way grape varietals for wine are taken. This is where the idea of “generations” comes in. A tree made from a clipping from the originals is first generation. A tree made from a clipping from those trees is second generation, etc. Supposedly, generational distance impacts quality, mostly because it usually means that where the new tree is planted is probably (probably, not necessarily) less and less like the original location in terms of soil, sun, elevation etc.

Mostly I’m just curious if the truly early generation stuff is so rare and expensive that it is still the sort of thing given to presidents as gifts or kept by the PRC for governmental use or whether we could actually get our hands on such things. I have no idea how many first generation trees exist to know whether that’s a rare thing or a not so rare thing.

TeaBrat

@ Jim – according to the show Charles was referring to there are something like 5 of the original Da Hong Pao trees and the tea made from those trees is kept in a vault. It is very rare and expensive & the DHP tea we get now is all from the 2nd generation

Jim Marks

Well, there are second gen, third gen, fourth gen… DHP has become extremely popular, and to keep up with demand, more and more generations of bushes are being produced — to the point that anything fourth generation or later is referred to as Xiao Hong Pao (small red robe) or simply Hong Pao.

So I guess the most pointed way to ask the question (which I actually asked on a different tasting note) is whether Verdant’s leaves are 2nd gen or 3rd. Supposedly it makes a big difference.

Charles Thomas Draper

Jim, That’s a question for David Duckler….

Jim Marks

We’ve already made way more out of it than I intended. :-)

iTea

Hot debate going down….

TeaBrat

ahh. why is this coming up here, it isn’t even one of Verdant’s teas? And yes, I agree just ask David if you need to know.

Jim Marks

I don’t know, either. Like I said, it was a passing question, I think there was a misunderstanding about the information I wanted, it’s gotten completely over blown at this point, and I’m moving on.

iTea – no one’s debating anything.

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Charles Thomas Draper

Lately I have heard angels. LOL

TeaBrat

I’m trying to save my angels for special occasions… :)

Charles Thomas Draper

Every second is a special occasion

Amariel

The great thing with oolongs, is that even if they cost a bit more, you can get multiple steeps, and the flavour can change the more you steep it, so it does balance out a little, cost-wise.

Jim Marks

Toasty oolongs are a great variety for finding reasonably priced stand bys for day to day cups that won’t break the bank.

Charles Thomas Draper Jim, Amy turned me on to this very informative video about the Wuyi growing region. I am sure it will answer your question concerning the Big Red Robe. As far as i know, most are clones off of the original trees….
ScottTeaMan

Ahhh…….Da Hong Pao, avery enjoyable tea.

Jim Marks

As I understand it they aren’t “clones” but are grown from clippings, the same way grape varietals for wine are taken. This is where the idea of “generations” comes in. A tree made from a clipping from the originals is first generation. A tree made from a clipping from those trees is second generation, etc. Supposedly, generational distance impacts quality, mostly because it usually means that where the new tree is planted is probably (probably, not necessarily) less and less like the original location in terms of soil, sun, elevation etc.

Mostly I’m just curious if the truly early generation stuff is so rare and expensive that it is still the sort of thing given to presidents as gifts or kept by the PRC for governmental use or whether we could actually get our hands on such things. I have no idea how many first generation trees exist to know whether that’s a rare thing or a not so rare thing.

TeaBrat

@ Jim – according to the show Charles was referring to there are something like 5 of the original Da Hong Pao trees and the tea made from those trees is kept in a vault. It is very rare and expensive & the DHP tea we get now is all from the 2nd generation

Jim Marks

Well, there are second gen, third gen, fourth gen… DHP has become extremely popular, and to keep up with demand, more and more generations of bushes are being produced — to the point that anything fourth generation or later is referred to as Xiao Hong Pao (small red robe) or simply Hong Pao.

So I guess the most pointed way to ask the question (which I actually asked on a different tasting note) is whether Verdant’s leaves are 2nd gen or 3rd. Supposedly it makes a big difference.

Charles Thomas Draper

Jim, That’s a question for David Duckler….

Jim Marks

We’ve already made way more out of it than I intended. :-)

iTea

Hot debate going down….

TeaBrat

ahh. why is this coming up here, it isn’t even one of Verdant’s teas? And yes, I agree just ask David if you need to know.

Jim Marks

I don’t know, either. Like I said, it was a passing question, I think there was a misunderstanding about the information I wanted, it’s gotten completely over blown at this point, and I’m moving on.

iTea – no one’s debating anything.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

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My profile pic is of a pink dahlia at Golden Gate Park.

Hobbies include: tea, making art, animals, vegan things, buddhism, nature, creativity, books, writing, cooking, meditation, yoga.

I am a fan of many different teas but my favorites are blacks and oolongs, chai, also like darjeeling and pu-erh. I’n always learning and expanding my horizons!

Dislikes include: bergamot, jasmine, highly tannic or bitter teas, overly judgmental and bitter people. :)

Live in San Francisco, I’m a SINK (single income, no kids) and love the urban life, but traveling out to the middle of nowhere is always fun too.

I tend to not drink things I know I will hate so a lot of my tea ratings are on the higher side. Here’s my rating system, sorta

95-100 I love this tea and would like to keep it around

94-90 An excellent tea which I may or may not repurchase

89-80 Pretty good, above average

79-70 Acceptable

69-60 Mundane – Will probably drink it if I have it

59-50 Ick

49 and below Nasty

Location

San Frandisco

Website

http://sanfrantea.teatra.de

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