94

Backlogging – we had this at a tea tasting at lunch today and both loved it. Very rich, smooth, malty and sweet. Sadly I cannot really write descriptively about teas hours after I have had them. I do know I was tempted to buy it.

ScottTeaMan

I’ll have to try some samples from ITC. Also, last time I checked, they had some really cool Yixing Gaiwans. They may be easier to season than Yixing teapots. so, how do you like your “little elf” teapot? :))

TeaBrat

I like it – for oolong tea only

Jim Marks

The more tea I drink, the more Yunnan golds are becoming my benchmark for all “darker” teas (black, oolong, &c.)

Hopefully, over time I can invest in a suite of yixing and will eventually have one just for Yunnans which I am sure will improve them all the more.

Is a yixing gaiwan really all that much smaller than a 100-150ml tea pot?

TeaBrat

Jim, they are probably about the same size. I would like to go back and get some of that yunnan gold. It was quite delicious I must say. Definitely not cheap though at $14/oz

ScottTeaMan

Imperial Tea Court Ming Gaiwans are 8 oz, 236.59 ml- the gaiwans I was referring to. They can be that small. The biggest gaiwan I’ve seen is a porecelain 10 oz-approx 300ml.

Jim Marks

So that’s actually bigger than a lot of yixing tea pots. Were you suggesting they’d be easier to season simply because their geometry is simpler? I’m looking to start investing in yixing “soon” and was thinking of also getting at least one gaiwan, but this may simplify everything.

ScottTeaMan

Yes, the Gaiwans are smaller, generally speaking. I haven’t seen one beyond 12 oz. Yixings can be small too, but I have seen Yixing teapots up to 25 oz.. Personally, I like my Yixing Gaiwans at 7-8 oz (207-237ml)-and my teapots between 6-10 oz ( 177-296ml).

ScottTeaMan

Jim, I didnt see you in my message compose section, so here is some info I discussed with Amy, about Yixing seasoning of teapots & gaiwans.:

SEASONING YIXING TEAPOTS
Inbox
Sent
ScottTeaMan wrote 5 days ago
AMY:

Here are a couple links on seasoning your Yixing teapot:

http://www.gongfugirl.com/seasoning-a-new-yixing-teapot/

http://teamasters.blogspot.com/2005/05/various-techniques-to-prepare-new.html

Hope this helps. Enjoy! :))

Scott

delete
Amy oh wrote 5 days ago

hmm. that is interesting. did you use the complicated method or the simple method?
ScottTeaMan wrote 5 days ago

I believe I used the simple method. I personally think You can clean the pot successfully w/out boiling water….say just below boiling:

(from website below)

Teamaster Teaparker does not recommend the other methods where you boil the teapot. He thinks this may clog the pores in the clay. But such pores are essential to the ‘breathing’ function of the teapot. Without the pores, you may just as well drink from a glazed gaiwan/gaibei.

I was always leary of boiling the pot, I mean come on….FOR 30 MINUTES!! YIKES!!

Personally I didn’t do that. The Key is to sterilize and wash away impuruties. I didn’t boil my Yixing. You can do what you want, I’m just saying, I didn’t do that.

Jim, I hope this helps! :))

ScottTeaMan

I just didn’t want to risk damaging my teapot. I’ve read you are suppossed to fill Yixing 2/3 full with tea, but I think it is too much. That’s just my preference. I also don’t have all the equipment for true Gongfu tea preperation. They have plenty of vids on YOUTUBE if you’re interested. :))

I hope this helps.

Jim Marks

Yeah, I know how seasoning works. Which, since it involves 100% sinking the pot into tea, I wasn’t clear why one object would be easier/harder than another to season. Obviously, the pot continues to season over time, and perhaps the intricate shape of a pot poses challenges not found in a gaiwan. The question really had nothing to do with how seasoning works, which I understand, but was more about clarification as to why seasoning object A would be easier/harder than object B. Not something to get into on someone else’s tea note and this has already gone way too far.

TeaBrat

yeah, get a room people!!!

ScottTeaMan

I just meant typically smaller gaiwans are a little easier to handle, and thus seasoning may be easier. The seasoning info was only meant to help you, and I should’ve PM you, but your name wasn’t on my list.

Sorry Amy.

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ScottTeaMan

I’ll have to try some samples from ITC. Also, last time I checked, they had some really cool Yixing Gaiwans. They may be easier to season than Yixing teapots. so, how do you like your “little elf” teapot? :))

TeaBrat

I like it – for oolong tea only

Jim Marks

The more tea I drink, the more Yunnan golds are becoming my benchmark for all “darker” teas (black, oolong, &c.)

Hopefully, over time I can invest in a suite of yixing and will eventually have one just for Yunnans which I am sure will improve them all the more.

Is a yixing gaiwan really all that much smaller than a 100-150ml tea pot?

TeaBrat

Jim, they are probably about the same size. I would like to go back and get some of that yunnan gold. It was quite delicious I must say. Definitely not cheap though at $14/oz

ScottTeaMan

Imperial Tea Court Ming Gaiwans are 8 oz, 236.59 ml- the gaiwans I was referring to. They can be that small. The biggest gaiwan I’ve seen is a porecelain 10 oz-approx 300ml.

Jim Marks

So that’s actually bigger than a lot of yixing tea pots. Were you suggesting they’d be easier to season simply because their geometry is simpler? I’m looking to start investing in yixing “soon” and was thinking of also getting at least one gaiwan, but this may simplify everything.

ScottTeaMan

Yes, the Gaiwans are smaller, generally speaking. I haven’t seen one beyond 12 oz. Yixings can be small too, but I have seen Yixing teapots up to 25 oz.. Personally, I like my Yixing Gaiwans at 7-8 oz (207-237ml)-and my teapots between 6-10 oz ( 177-296ml).

ScottTeaMan

Jim, I didnt see you in my message compose section, so here is some info I discussed with Amy, about Yixing seasoning of teapots & gaiwans.:

SEASONING YIXING TEAPOTS
Inbox
Sent
ScottTeaMan wrote 5 days ago
AMY:

Here are a couple links on seasoning your Yixing teapot:

http://www.gongfugirl.com/seasoning-a-new-yixing-teapot/

http://teamasters.blogspot.com/2005/05/various-techniques-to-prepare-new.html

Hope this helps. Enjoy! :))

Scott

delete
Amy oh wrote 5 days ago

hmm. that is interesting. did you use the complicated method or the simple method?
ScottTeaMan wrote 5 days ago

I believe I used the simple method. I personally think You can clean the pot successfully w/out boiling water….say just below boiling:

(from website below)

Teamaster Teaparker does not recommend the other methods where you boil the teapot. He thinks this may clog the pores in the clay. But such pores are essential to the ‘breathing’ function of the teapot. Without the pores, you may just as well drink from a glazed gaiwan/gaibei.

I was always leary of boiling the pot, I mean come on….FOR 30 MINUTES!! YIKES!!

Personally I didn’t do that. The Key is to sterilize and wash away impuruties. I didn’t boil my Yixing. You can do what you want, I’m just saying, I didn’t do that.

Jim, I hope this helps! :))

ScottTeaMan

I just didn’t want to risk damaging my teapot. I’ve read you are suppossed to fill Yixing 2/3 full with tea, but I think it is too much. That’s just my preference. I also don’t have all the equipment for true Gongfu tea preperation. They have plenty of vids on YOUTUBE if you’re interested. :))

I hope this helps.

Jim Marks

Yeah, I know how seasoning works. Which, since it involves 100% sinking the pot into tea, I wasn’t clear why one object would be easier/harder than another to season. Obviously, the pot continues to season over time, and perhaps the intricate shape of a pot poses challenges not found in a gaiwan. The question really had nothing to do with how seasoning works, which I understand, but was more about clarification as to why seasoning object A would be easier/harder than object B. Not something to get into on someone else’s tea note and this has already gone way too far.

TeaBrat

yeah, get a room people!!!

ScottTeaMan

I just meant typically smaller gaiwans are a little easier to handle, and thus seasoning may be easier. The seasoning info was only meant to help you, and I should’ve PM you, but your name wasn’t on my list.

Sorry Amy.

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Bio

My profile pic is of a pink dahlia at Golden Gate Park.

Hobbies include: tea, making art, animals, vegan things, buddhism, nature, creativity, books, writing, cooking, meditation, yoga.

I am a fan of many different teas but my favorites are blacks and oolongs, chai, also like darjeeling and pu-erh. I’n always learning and expanding my horizons!

Dislikes include: bergamot, jasmine, highly tannic or bitter teas, overly judgmental and bitter people. :)

Live in San Francisco, I’m a SINK (single income, no kids) and love the urban life, but traveling out to the middle of nowhere is always fun too.

I tend to not drink things I know I will hate so a lot of my tea ratings are on the higher side. Here’s my rating system, sorta

95-100 I love this tea and would like to keep it around

94-90 An excellent tea which I may or may not repurchase

89-80 Pretty good, above average

79-70 Acceptable

69-60 Mundane – Will probably drink it if I have it

59-50 Ick

49 and below Nasty

Location

San Frandisco

Website

http://sanfrantea.teatra.de

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