I recently placed my first official order with Teavivre. I got free shipping but it arrived quickly. Of the teas I ordered, this was the only I had never tried, and I was especially excited about it. Of course, I could just add a bit of honey to my tea. One of my former music students became an organic farmer and sells honey as well, but I never add it to my tea, though I used to add it to herbals.

There was something special about hearing that this tea is SOAKED in honey produced by bees kept around this tea plantation. Wow! And wow, again!

I made this gong fu style. First steep – very good. Nice TGY and the honey really doesn’t mask the flavor. In fact, if I didn’t already know it was there I might not know it was there, you know? :)

Second steep – darker, more flavor. The leaves have really unfurled now and are quite large. What started as a thin layer of pellets on the bottom of the pot is now a pot bursting with leaves. I am now eating my salad for lunch, and I must say this tea is an amazing pairing for it: baby spring mix, tomatoes, celery, Swiss cheese, and Sweet Vidalia Onion dressing. The TGY just turned my salad into a feast.

Third and fourth steeps – the tea is a little tiny bit astringent now and doing just what the Chinese like for it to do…cleanse the palate after the meal. Perfect timing since my salad is now gone!

Delicious, and oh yes, I would definitely order this again.

SimplyJenW

Mine got here, too. I am passing along my samples of the bailin gong fu to my knitting/tea drinking friend. I did ask in an email response to the order confirmation if they would send samples of the Milk Oolong….and there are two additional small pouches of a mystery sample. I wish I could read Chinese! ;)

MegWesley

What is gong fu style? Is that when you steep it in one of those little bowls?

ashmanra

You steep the tea in a tiny pot using more leaves than you normally would for regular brewing but using a shorter steep time. You resteep the leaves almost immediately, pouring the tea into a pitcher or fair cup, sometimes called a fairness cup, so you can start the next steep. The tea is usually then served in tiny cups ranging from one to three ounces. The multiple infusions really bring out different flavors!

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SimplyJenW

Mine got here, too. I am passing along my samples of the bailin gong fu to my knitting/tea drinking friend. I did ask in an email response to the order confirmation if they would send samples of the Milk Oolong….and there are two additional small pouches of a mystery sample. I wish I could read Chinese! ;)

MegWesley

What is gong fu style? Is that when you steep it in one of those little bowls?

ashmanra

You steep the tea in a tiny pot using more leaves than you normally would for regular brewing but using a shorter steep time. You resteep the leaves almost immediately, pouring the tea into a pitcher or fair cup, sometimes called a fairness cup, so you can start the next steep. The tea is usually then served in tiny cups ranging from one to three ounces. The multiple infusions really bring out different flavors!

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I am a music teacher and homeschooling mom who started drinking loose leaf tea about four years ago! My daughters and I have tea every day, and we are frequently joined by my students or friends for “tea time.” Now my hubby joins us, too. His tastes have evolved from Tetley with milk and sugar to mostly unadorned greens.

We have learned so much history, geography, and culture in this journey.

My avatar is a mole in a teacup! Long story…

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North Carolina

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