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Continuing my love affair with Moroccan Mint, I decided to share it with my bestie today after we had some Asian Pear from this same company. This is their own house blend of Moroccan Mint. Their gunpowder green base is smooth and not at all smokey. The spearmint is strong but not offensively so, indeed I love it!

Our experiment involved adding honey. I have had this plain and with sugar. When I was at Moo Mart (where we feel like cattle when we shop) I saw some raw mountain honey from the western part of our state. I wanted to try it in my MM.

We began with plain tea so my friend could get a clear taste of the tea. Then we added her Manuka honey from Bird Pick Tea and Herb. It was nice, but the honey flavor was definitely noticeable and different from adding sugar.

Next came the Moo Mart honey. When I opened it, I was really taken aback. It smelled like HORSE! Seriously, like horse!!! I thought mixing it with spearmint tea would dampen the horse completely down, but alas, when I lifted my cup it smelled like horse and the sip tasted a wee bit horsey. I love puerh, but come on. Horsey honey?

Next cup got raw sugar from Whole Foods, and that was the best of the sweetened cups. I think this is great plain, though, so I will probably only drink this when I want a cooling, sweet iced tea.

Jim Marks

What was the flower involved in the honey? That’s really bizarre.

My favorite honey is dark amber buckwheat — but it is terrible for tea because it has a very strong flavor of its own that can overwhelm a lot of teas. Fantastic in steamed steel cut oats, or something, though.

ashmanra

Jim, I don’t know what flower. I looked the label over pretty carefully and see it. Maybe they are wild honeybees with really bad taste! LOL! I think they have been visiting Bradford pears, based on the smell! :)

Jim Marks

It probably isn’t a single source, then. Usually those are a safe bet, especially for tea, because the blending of flavors tends to produce a fairly neutral sweetness.

Horsey smell? Maybe they were getting into the dingle berries. ;-)

ashmanra

Eeeewww!

Sandy

I didn’t know horseflies could make honey.

Dylan Oxford

I’ve always been partial to Orange Blossom honey. My sister is a honey enthusiast, and has roughly as many jars of honey on her desk as I do cans of tea. I’ll have to ask her about buckwheat honey.

ashmanra

Well, hello there, Sandy! Don’t be a stranger!
Dylan: I have a little organic, raw honey that a former student of mine sells from her farm. That is the one i should use until i get my own Manuka honey.I think you are right….I should stick with honey that has a provenance!

Jim Marks

Beester?

ashmanra

Jim, I bet a ton of people would sign up! There are foodies for EVERYTHING! :)

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Comments

Jim Marks

What was the flower involved in the honey? That’s really bizarre.

My favorite honey is dark amber buckwheat — but it is terrible for tea because it has a very strong flavor of its own that can overwhelm a lot of teas. Fantastic in steamed steel cut oats, or something, though.

ashmanra

Jim, I don’t know what flower. I looked the label over pretty carefully and see it. Maybe they are wild honeybees with really bad taste! LOL! I think they have been visiting Bradford pears, based on the smell! :)

Jim Marks

It probably isn’t a single source, then. Usually those are a safe bet, especially for tea, because the blending of flavors tends to produce a fairly neutral sweetness.

Horsey smell? Maybe they were getting into the dingle berries. ;-)

ashmanra

Eeeewww!

Sandy

I didn’t know horseflies could make honey.

Dylan Oxford

I’ve always been partial to Orange Blossom honey. My sister is a honey enthusiast, and has roughly as many jars of honey on her desk as I do cans of tea. I’ll have to ask her about buckwheat honey.

ashmanra

Well, hello there, Sandy! Don’t be a stranger!
Dylan: I have a little organic, raw honey that a former student of mine sells from her farm. That is the one i should use until i get my own Manuka honey.I think you are right….I should stick with honey that has a provenance!

Jim Marks

Beester?

ashmanra

Jim, I bet a ton of people would sign up! There are foodies for EVERYTHING! :)

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

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Bio

I am a music teacher and homeschooling mom who started drinking loose leaf tea about four years ago! My daughters and I have tea every day, and we are frequently joined by my students or friends for “tea time.” Now my hubby joins us, too. His tastes have evolved from Tetley with milk and sugar to mostly unadorned greens.

We have learned so much history, geography, and culture in this journey.

My avatar is a mole in a teacup! Long story…

Location

North Carolina

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