Yeh, baby! That’s what I’m talking ’bout!

I am having my umpteenth steep….okay, maybe fifth, of this and it is so good. This is a really different tea, and this steep is much like the last. It tastes like tea that has been aged in a wooden cask. I hesitated at the price before, but these leaves just keep going and going.

Edited to add: I think I know what the other aroma is. Tobacco!

Thank you, Russel and Harney and Sons!

Azzrian

Ah it is already on my shopping list! Yay!

Scatterbrain

I know in the description of this it says that it isn’t a pu-erh which puzzles me, I was wondering if you or anyone knows exactly why it doesn’t qualify as a pu-erh haha. Nevertheless, sounds good.

ashmanra

KWinter: it is illegal to call a tea puerh that doesn’t come from Yunnan province. That is my understanding, just as in the US, Vidalia onions have to be grown in Vidalia County, Georgia. The same onion grown elsewhere is just a sweet onion! The same rule applies to champagne and many types of cheese.

Scatterbrain

Oh, I see. Thank you. :)

TeaBrat

Gah! I want this too!

ashmanra

I know, Amy, I know! You NEED it! I am sure you can ’splain that! I bet Russel will send you a sample if you ask! :DDD

Jim Marks

Yes, the 20 Chinese Famous Teas are a “protected” product in the same way that France, Italy, and now the EU in general, protects regional specialties when it is recognized that “terroir” plays a crucial element in a thing tasting like a thing.

This is done less in the USA, but there are some prominent examples. Vidalia onions are one, Hatch peppers are another. There are also informal examples (some of which ought to be formalized in my opinion) like Philly cheesesteaks (there is something about the local bread, probably due to local water, that makes these “not the same” anywhere else), New York pizza, Atlantic City salt water taffy, gumbo from the Gulf coast, and of course the myriad varieties of both pork and beef based barbecue techniques which produce radically different flavor profiles depending on whether you’re talking about Memphis, Carolina, St. Louis or Houston.

Jim Marks

For those who have access to the HEB speciality Chain ‘Central Market’, there is an exclusive offering from Republic of Tea in the bulk dry goods area which is an aged green cake tea of excellent quality which sells for something like $50 a pound. Which is actually quite cheap compared to pu-erh. Even their loose shou pu-erh sells for twice that much.

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Comments

Azzrian

Ah it is already on my shopping list! Yay!

Scatterbrain

I know in the description of this it says that it isn’t a pu-erh which puzzles me, I was wondering if you or anyone knows exactly why it doesn’t qualify as a pu-erh haha. Nevertheless, sounds good.

ashmanra

KWinter: it is illegal to call a tea puerh that doesn’t come from Yunnan province. That is my understanding, just as in the US, Vidalia onions have to be grown in Vidalia County, Georgia. The same onion grown elsewhere is just a sweet onion! The same rule applies to champagne and many types of cheese.

Scatterbrain

Oh, I see. Thank you. :)

TeaBrat

Gah! I want this too!

ashmanra

I know, Amy, I know! You NEED it! I am sure you can ’splain that! I bet Russel will send you a sample if you ask! :DDD

Jim Marks

Yes, the 20 Chinese Famous Teas are a “protected” product in the same way that France, Italy, and now the EU in general, protects regional specialties when it is recognized that “terroir” plays a crucial element in a thing tasting like a thing.

This is done less in the USA, but there are some prominent examples. Vidalia onions are one, Hatch peppers are another. There are also informal examples (some of which ought to be formalized in my opinion) like Philly cheesesteaks (there is something about the local bread, probably due to local water, that makes these “not the same” anywhere else), New York pizza, Atlantic City salt water taffy, gumbo from the Gulf coast, and of course the myriad varieties of both pork and beef based barbecue techniques which produce radically different flavor profiles depending on whether you’re talking about Memphis, Carolina, St. Louis or Houston.

Jim Marks

For those who have access to the HEB speciality Chain ‘Central Market’, there is an exclusive offering from Republic of Tea in the bulk dry goods area which is an aged green cake tea of excellent quality which sells for something like $50 a pound. Which is actually quite cheap compared to pu-erh. Even their loose shou pu-erh sells for twice that much.

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Bio

I am a music teacher and homeschooling mom who started drinking loose leaf tea about five years ago! My daughters and I have tea every day, and we are frequently joined by my students or friends for “tea time.” Now my hubby joins us, too. His tastes have evolved from Tetley with milk and sugar to mostly unadorned greens and oolongs.

We have learned so much history, geography, and culture in this journey.

My avatar is a mole in a teacup! Long story…

Location

North Carolina

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