91
drank Tangerine Blossom by Shang Tea
807 tasting notes

Unfortunately I have only a sample of this.
So is it red? Is it white? Is it black? LOL the label says Red. The description says fermented white. I really do NOT care. Its amazing – that is all I need to know right now. Sure I will do some research at some point and learn what to call this tea, if it is red, or white, or who’s on first….but for now I am going to immerse myself in the simple pleasure of drinking it. Its divine. There is a jasmine aroma, or is it orange blossom water as another steepster suggested? Well I have orange blossom water and orange blossom water is a bit more orange, this is more floral and distinctly jasmine to me, when compared to my jasmine essential oil. I am on the second steep – just as delightful as the first – and plan to have this tea all evening long. I may set it aside for a bit and try something else in between but who knows – this is really speaking to me right now.
Yes there is a bit of a twang of slight bitterness in this tea, tangy like.
I have a strong feeling that tangerine is going to come out more in steep three.
Don’t ask me why I just have that feeling.
There is a subtle nutty flavor playing around in there somewhere.
The flavor left behind on the palate is almost metallic – in a way.
Have you ever eaten a nut, any kind really that has a skin, maybe some skin stayed on the nut after shelling it or maybe you are eating peanuts with skins on them. Do you know that tangy flavor from the nut skins? That is the flavor I am speaking of.
A bit drying on the back of the throat.
Yet a very very juicy tea! When you sip it not only does the tea quench you but its as if the tea makes your mouth water too. Its hard to explain and just has to be experienced.
Really enjoy this tea. Will put on my shopping list.
GAD I am starting to love floral teas!
GAD I never use the term GAD!
Hummmm
Empty cup … off to steep again! :)
YAY!

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 3 min, 0 sec
LiberTEAS

In China, they call black tea … red tea. I had the same question though about the fermented white tea vs. black tea back when I tried this tea. Shang Tea wrote back with this explanation: Hello! Thanks for reviewing our tea and I’m glad you liked it! Just to clarify about the white tea/black tea question that you had, we make this tea by scenting oxidized white tea leaves with tangerine blossoms. It is a black tea, but since we make it using white tea leaves from our farm, it is a smoother, milder black tea.

Missy

Egads!!!! :P

Azzrian

Okay wait … my bag here (sample bag) says Tangerine Blossom Premium Red Tea
So am I not reviewing this under the right place since this is “premium”? And how does a white tea, black tea, become a red tea?
I love Shang Tea, love THIS tea, but I am utterly confused lol
Shang people … help a local out!

TeaBrat

I think it’s a red tea made out of a white tea cultivar. It still doesn’t make any sense to me, but there you have it.

Azzrian

Yup clear as mud :)

Nicole

LiberTEAS has it right. According to Shang, it would be a white tea that is oxidized to become a black tea and then called red because that’s what they call black teas in China. :) I have seen it written elsewhere that white, black and green teas all have the ability to be any of the three, depending on when the leaf is picked and how it is treated after harvesting – I’m sure someone around here can confirm/deny/both confirm & deny the truth of that tidbit.

I would hazard a guess that “premium” means you are paying more for it because it started life as a high quality white tea. ;) Whatever the case, it is excellent tea.

Shang Tea

Hello all, sorry for the confusion. Liberteas and Amy oh have this right, we make this “red” or black tea from the white tea cultivars that we have on our farm. We have both the Da Bai and Da Hao cultivars which both have lots of little white hairs on the buds/leaves year round. These cultivars were the original tea bushes used for white tea production, and they are the cultivars that we use to produce our red/black tea.

Azzrian

Thank you all – and Shang for coming in here! It does make sense now – I guess my mind was too befuddled last night to grasp it :)

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Comments

LiberTEAS

In China, they call black tea … red tea. I had the same question though about the fermented white tea vs. black tea back when I tried this tea. Shang Tea wrote back with this explanation: Hello! Thanks for reviewing our tea and I’m glad you liked it! Just to clarify about the white tea/black tea question that you had, we make this tea by scenting oxidized white tea leaves with tangerine blossoms. It is a black tea, but since we make it using white tea leaves from our farm, it is a smoother, milder black tea.

Missy

Egads!!!! :P

Azzrian

Okay wait … my bag here (sample bag) says Tangerine Blossom Premium Red Tea
So am I not reviewing this under the right place since this is “premium”? And how does a white tea, black tea, become a red tea?
I love Shang Tea, love THIS tea, but I am utterly confused lol
Shang people … help a local out!

TeaBrat

I think it’s a red tea made out of a white tea cultivar. It still doesn’t make any sense to me, but there you have it.

Azzrian

Yup clear as mud :)

Nicole

LiberTEAS has it right. According to Shang, it would be a white tea that is oxidized to become a black tea and then called red because that’s what they call black teas in China. :) I have seen it written elsewhere that white, black and green teas all have the ability to be any of the three, depending on when the leaf is picked and how it is treated after harvesting – I’m sure someone around here can confirm/deny/both confirm & deny the truth of that tidbit.

I would hazard a guess that “premium” means you are paying more for it because it started life as a high quality white tea. ;) Whatever the case, it is excellent tea.

Shang Tea

Hello all, sorry for the confusion. Liberteas and Amy oh have this right, we make this “red” or black tea from the white tea cultivars that we have on our farm. We have both the Da Bai and Da Hao cultivars which both have lots of little white hairs on the buds/leaves year round. These cultivars were the original tea bushes used for white tea production, and they are the cultivars that we use to produce our red/black tea.

Azzrian

Thank you all – and Shang for coming in here! It does make sense now – I guess my mind was too befuddled last night to grasp it :)

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Bio

Most of my reviews will be “snippits” of full reviews that can be found at http://sororiteasisters.com/
Posted every evening at 6 EST.
I usually try to post the exact date that the full reviews will post however sometimes post dates need changed so it may not always be correct. Generally the dates are correct however.

About Me:

Most of my reviews, although not all, will be quite favorable of the tea. This is not because all tea is excellent, but more so because I generally will not waste my time on an inferior tea. If I do not care for a tea I won’t continue to drink it let alone spend time reviewing it. If you see a review by me you basically know it is a quality tea. Granted it may not suit your specific taste buds, we all like different things, but as for a tea on the whole it is a good one, from a good company.

I am a spiritual advisor by profession.
I have two “young adult” children.
Four cats and three dogs.

Some of my hobbies include gardening, essential oil therapy, natural perfumery with essential oils, and cooking.

I look for complexity overall in any tea, dimensions to the flavors.

I believe tea should evoke a feeling, thought, emotion, or attitude.

I enjoy most all oolongs, blacks, whites, and greens.

I always love to try a good yellow tea.

I favor unadulterated teas but I do have my longings for a good flavored tea now and then so I don’t rule them out by any means!

I enjoy green rooibos don not like red rooibos.

Find me on facebook and twitter – Azzrian Visions

Location

Kansas

Website

http://www.azzrianvisions.com

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