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Thank you Teavivre again for this Pu-erh sample!

I requested a some Pu-erh samples in my last batch from Angel and was so pleased at the generous amount of Pu-erh bark packaged so beautifully. I adore a rich brew in the morning…especially Pu-erh!

The packaging was brown paper with a farm scene printed on it depicting pots filled with picked tea leaves, a storage crock and a pressed Pu-erh cake. Inside the bark was like a dark chocolate bar changed into chunky bark form.

The directions on the package said to steep 2-10 minutes. Wow, that was a big time range! Since I enjoy rich Pu-erh, I chose a longer 8 minute brew in my glass Western Style pot with big stainless basket so I can peek and watch.
The wet leaves were auburn brown with long beautiful shreds but not very fragrant.
The pour was dark and at first taste tingly in my tongue, juicy and mild. I was surprised that this tea was not herbaceous or earthy considering such a long steeping. There was mineral, almost no salt and a light natural sweetness. I wondered if this was a tea leaf picked from trees on a rocky hill, or volcanic soil instead of lush forest because of the mildness. There is tannin and dryness.

I tried some sugar and cream but the tea is not strong and rich enough to support these additions. You need more earthiness and salt for latte goodness. This Pu-erh is one of those that is definately better straight up!

I brought up the online notes for brewing and discovered the difference between the package directions (2-10 minutes) and the online directions (1-2 minutes) EEKS!

To be fair I went back and did a shorter steep time to see if the flavor was completely different.

Second steep at 2 minutes. Nice redish golden liquor, very little nose to the liquor at all.
The flavor was juicy still, super mild and sweet enough to drink as is. There is that tannin but not overly obnoxious and there is a little saltiness. I can’t imagine anyone having issues with this Pu-erh. All the Pu-erh haters should put down their protest signs and enjoy this tea because it is so gentle.
I added a little sugar with this lighter version and actually liked it. It brought out a bakery flavor like a cream cookie which was unexpected.

Here you have two ways to have a Pu-erh depending on how you like your brew.
1. Long steep and drink it straight up.
2. Short steep and add a little sweetening for a bakery cookie flavor
Either way, this is so mild that you can share with Pu-erh sceptics and have no fear. There is no fishiness or heavy earthiness here. A good introduction to raw Pu-erh.

Missy

Angel is sending me samples. I’m going to ask her for this one. I’ve been thinking I should try a pu-erh. They do sound a bit intimidating at first. I actually have one but I have to figure out how to break the silly thing apart. I got a mushroom looking like cake from the asian store here. Now it was not very spendy so it might not be so good. I have smelled it and it smells like leather to me. Actually it smells like my grandpa. Excellent memories. Any who thanks for the recommendation!

Bonnie

I don’t break it apart! If you just pour the first water over for 20 seconds (this is a rinse or short steep) and discard the water or save for plants and do it again the pu-erh will loosen up!

Missy

hmm. It looks like too much to use for my tea pot even. Can I pour water over it and then let it some of the leaves dry to use later? Now I have to go see the cake in relation to my hand!

Bonnie

Yes, if you have a lot break off a chunk or cut.I have a puer knife. I’m sorry, I thought you had a small piece.

Missy

So this cake is about as big as my fist. I have a gaiwan and a 42 ounce teapot.

TeaBrat

I use a cheese knife for large cakes

Missy

Thanks! I watched a video on how to break apart a brick but this shape is different. It’s shaped like a mushroom head. I think I’ll have to get it in some bright light so I can see which way the leaves are going and the best place to stick my knife in. Those flat bricks look pretty simple to break apart.

Bonnie

If you look on the Verdant website under Puerh and the learning part…you can see a gaiwan and an amount used with water being poured over the piece. This might give you an idea of how much to cut off and use.

Missy

Thank you for the information! My notices aren’t working at the moment so it took me a while to figure out how to check up on this.

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Missy

Angel is sending me samples. I’m going to ask her for this one. I’ve been thinking I should try a pu-erh. They do sound a bit intimidating at first. I actually have one but I have to figure out how to break the silly thing apart. I got a mushroom looking like cake from the asian store here. Now it was not very spendy so it might not be so good. I have smelled it and it smells like leather to me. Actually it smells like my grandpa. Excellent memories. Any who thanks for the recommendation!

Bonnie

I don’t break it apart! If you just pour the first water over for 20 seconds (this is a rinse or short steep) and discard the water or save for plants and do it again the pu-erh will loosen up!

Missy

hmm. It looks like too much to use for my tea pot even. Can I pour water over it and then let it some of the leaves dry to use later? Now I have to go see the cake in relation to my hand!

Bonnie

Yes, if you have a lot break off a chunk or cut.I have a puer knife. I’m sorry, I thought you had a small piece.

Missy

So this cake is about as big as my fist. I have a gaiwan and a 42 ounce teapot.

TeaBrat

I use a cheese knife for large cakes

Missy

Thanks! I watched a video on how to break apart a brick but this shape is different. It’s shaped like a mushroom head. I think I’ll have to get it in some bright light so I can see which way the leaves are going and the best place to stick my knife in. Those flat bricks look pretty simple to break apart.

Bonnie

If you look on the Verdant website under Puerh and the learning part…you can see a gaiwan and an amount used with water being poured over the piece. This might give you an idea of how much to cut off and use.

Missy

Thank you for the information! My notices aren’t working at the moment so it took me a while to figure out how to check up on this.

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Colorado Grandma
http://www.teaandincense.com
Grandmother to 3 teenaged girls and 5 young boys. (we all drink tea!) I began teatime in the Summer over 30 years ago when my children were little. We took a break from play for tea and snacks every day. My children loved tea time.
There are several tea houses close to my home and a Tea Festival in Boulder. Fort Collins is a bit of a foodie town. We brew lots of Beer (Fat Tire is one brand) and have several Spice Shops (Savory was one featured on Food Network).
Colorado State University is a mile from my home and the Rocky Mountains begin to climb at the end of my street. The climate is semi-arid with LOTS OF SUN AT 5000 feet. (Heavy Winter snows start in higher elevations). Living my whole life in Northern California (Silicon Valley) I have to admit that I LOVE IT HERE!!!
I attend a wonderful Greek Orthodox Church and enjoy cooking ethnic foods (all kinds). I am disabled with Migraines and Fibromyalgia.
My family is Bi-racial (African-American, Scots) and Bi-cultural, (Peru, Cyprus, France, Mexico, Native American)
I’ve worked at a Winery, was a System Analyst, in telecom, been an Athlete and Coach, Artist, Vista Volunteer. Love healthy cooking (and delicious food!). Love to travel and have been to Italy, Greece, Turkey, Malta, Peru, Croatia, Canada, Mexico, Hawaii, Alaska

Location

Fort Collins,Colorado

Website

http://www.teaandincense.com

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