Thank you JC for this sample tea!

I’ve had Tibetan Pu-erh before and thought they were supposed to be pretty much the same.

Evidently NOT!

What I drank before was ‘what the men drink who are herding animals Tibetan Brick Pu-erh’ which was a little on the rough side, although
fun to try.

I’ve been reading a book about the Tea Horse Road in Tibet, and slowly writing a story on my blog about ‘Ritual’.
It’s a story about how tea has become a Ritual in my life, and what that means to me.

The tea I decided to pair with the story is this one, a special Tibetan Pu-erh, because of it’s long and colorful tradition. I also wanted to make some Butter Chai Tea! (Can’t use Yak Butter Chai Tea unfortunately!) And this tea is the one to use.

Butter Chai Tea Recipe
A little milk (1/2 c) and salt (1/4 tsp), some butter (2 TB) and water (5 c) and Tibetan Pu-erh (1TB) and bring to the boil then simmer. (You can make adjustments to suit you.)

A tasty broth to stave off cold when treking through snowy mountain passes, donkeys heavy laden with tea… bound for waiting merchants on the other end of the Tea Horse Road. (OK, I’m a romantic!)

Before making the Butter Chai Tea, I made some regular Tibetan steeped (30 seconds) Pu-erh in my gaiwan.
The flavor was smooth and sweet with a refreshing taste. No extreme earthiness or thick mouth-feel.

The mellow flavor made the Butter Chai Tea light and smooth.

Because the Pu-erh boiled and then sat to simmer (the way it would on an open fire) I wondered how it would taste after a bit.
I waited while it simmered 20 minutes on the stove, poured a mug… and the tea tasted just as good as at the first!

Lovely Mild Puerh

Ritual is a story on my blog www.teaandincense.com

I began drinking tea as a way to be still (quiet) because my mind wandered when I tried to pray. I had difficulty quieting a zooming Silicon Valley mind that had rushed for so many years. Like most people I had worried so much about the past and the future, I didn’t know how to meet with God in the present.

Carefully learning to prepare tea several times a day, I didn’t just drink the tea but thoughtfully looked for all that was good in the experience.

First, I smelled the aroma of the tea liquor. Then I gave full attention to the scent of the tea leaves, observing the color of the dry and wet leaves. Finally, I tasted the tea prepared different ways (plain, with sweetening or milk, and after the second or third steeping ). I learned to use different types of tea equipment and the tea names from a vast array of tea previously unknown to me.

……and so on….

Kashyap

which book…I have read the ‘tea horse road’ and I have a few others that follow the same theme…..and just curious?

Bonnie

Tea Horse Road

JC

Nice! Thanks for the recipe! This one is a ‘post-fermented’ Tibetan brick or Shu/Shou. I like it because its mellow and sweet. I want to try that butter mixture, and I don’t know how Yak butter tastes but I feel intrigued about it. I want to know which other animal’s butter taste similar enough to try it.

As you said the green/uncooked stuff is on the rougher side but always seem to have nutty/herbaceous taste. I can see that tasting nice with milk/butter, never actually tried it that way.

I’m feeling better again, so soon enough I’ll start drinking tea again, need to resume trying the samples!

Bonnie

Got the recipe from Roughage (in England) who says Yak butter tastes sourish. He tasted it in China I believe. Being that he’s a Necrolinguist (dead languages) and expert on Viking Berserkers, I tend to think he’d know.

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Comments

Kashyap

which book…I have read the ‘tea horse road’ and I have a few others that follow the same theme…..and just curious?

Bonnie

Tea Horse Road

JC

Nice! Thanks for the recipe! This one is a ‘post-fermented’ Tibetan brick or Shu/Shou. I like it because its mellow and sweet. I want to try that butter mixture, and I don’t know how Yak butter tastes but I feel intrigued about it. I want to know which other animal’s butter taste similar enough to try it.

As you said the green/uncooked stuff is on the rougher side but always seem to have nutty/herbaceous taste. I can see that tasting nice with milk/butter, never actually tried it that way.

I’m feeling better again, so soon enough I’ll start drinking tea again, need to resume trying the samples!

Bonnie

Got the recipe from Roughage (in England) who says Yak butter tastes sourish. He tasted it in China I believe. Being that he’s a Necrolinguist (dead languages) and expert on Viking Berserkers, I tend to think he’d know.

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Colorado Grandma
http://www.teaandincense.com
Grandmother to 3 teenaged girls and 5 young boys. (we all drink tea!) I began teatime in the Summer over 30 years ago when my children were little. We took a break from play for tea and snacks every day. My children loved tea time.
There are several tea houses close to my home and a Tea Festival in Boulder. Fort Collins is a bit of a foodie town. We brew lots of Beer (Fat Tire is one brand) and have several Spice Shops (Savory was one featured on Food Network).
Colorado State University is a mile from my home and the Rocky Mountains begin to climb at the end of my street. The climate is semi-arid with LOTS OF SUN AT 5000 feet. (Heavy Winter snows start in higher elevations). Living my whole life in Northern California (Silicon Valley) I have to admit that I LOVE IT HERE!!!
I attend a wonderful Greek Orthodox Church and enjoy cooking ethnic foods (all kinds). I am disabled with Migraines and Fibromyalgia.
My family is Bi-racial (African-American, Scots) and Bi-cultural, (Peru, Cyprus, France, Mexico, Native American)
I’ve worked at a Winery, was a System Analyst, in telecom, been an Athlete and Coach, Artist, Vista Volunteer. Love healthy cooking (and delicious food!). Love to travel and have been to Italy, Greece, Turkey, Malta, Peru, Croatia, Canada, Mexico, Hawaii, Alaska

Location

Fort Collins,Colorado

Website

http://www.teaandincense.com

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