92

Pretty, nice design, keeps tea warmer for longer than expected and yixing, so in about a year, I will have a wonderfully seasoned tea tumbler!

Note: I always have such issues with yixing because I can not decide with what I want to season them. I have several mugs and tea sets that are yixing that go widely unused for this reason, however, I think with the travel mug all will be fine since I only drink one or two teas in the morning on my daily drive to work.

Kashyap

I was looking into sourcing these and find them interesting in concept. I have a beautifully cured yixing purple clay teapot that is dedicated to black teas/shou pu erhs and another dedicated to oolongs and another dedicated to sheng pu erh and each makes compliments the tea down the path.

Cinoi

These are very nice. I was warned it can break if dropped, but I have been very careful. The brushed stainless steel is very attractive, with rubber accents to seal the top closed and keep the bottom from damaging surfaces and possibly leaving a water ring. The outside can get a bit warm, though it holds heat nicely (about an hour and a half, I’ve found) so all-in-all I think that this was worth the purchase.

Cinoi

If anyone has suggestions – or if I am completely wrong with seasoning this yixing, please let me know. I have seasoned two mugs (one with the Chocolate Pu-Erh and one with a Dragonwell) but this is my first with oolong. I am having trouble picking, because honestly, I don’t have years and years worth of any oolongs, my two absolute favorites are discontinued/no longer available and I am trying to season with similar oolong tea so that I can enjoy what remains of those. This is most likely completely wrong, but not sure what else I can do…

Kashyap

season the yixing to a ‘type’ of tea….black, pu erh, green, oolong…etc….don’t worry so much about the specific tea…but I would suggest if you going to use flavored/flavor additive teas, that you use glazed or glass as the flavorings are often a mix of ‘natural’, artifical, and synthetic and you don’t want those elements to embue into ceramic

Cinoi

Excellent! Glad I’m doing it sort of right! Thanks!

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Kashyap

I was looking into sourcing these and find them interesting in concept. I have a beautifully cured yixing purple clay teapot that is dedicated to black teas/shou pu erhs and another dedicated to oolongs and another dedicated to sheng pu erh and each makes compliments the tea down the path.

Cinoi

These are very nice. I was warned it can break if dropped, but I have been very careful. The brushed stainless steel is very attractive, with rubber accents to seal the top closed and keep the bottom from damaging surfaces and possibly leaving a water ring. The outside can get a bit warm, though it holds heat nicely (about an hour and a half, I’ve found) so all-in-all I think that this was worth the purchase.

Cinoi

If anyone has suggestions – or if I am completely wrong with seasoning this yixing, please let me know. I have seasoned two mugs (one with the Chocolate Pu-Erh and one with a Dragonwell) but this is my first with oolong. I am having trouble picking, because honestly, I don’t have years and years worth of any oolongs, my two absolute favorites are discontinued/no longer available and I am trying to season with similar oolong tea so that I can enjoy what remains of those. This is most likely completely wrong, but not sure what else I can do…

Kashyap

season the yixing to a ‘type’ of tea….black, pu erh, green, oolong…etc….don’t worry so much about the specific tea…but I would suggest if you going to use flavored/flavor additive teas, that you use glazed or glass as the flavorings are often a mix of ‘natural’, artifical, and synthetic and you don’t want those elements to embue into ceramic

Cinoi

Excellent! Glad I’m doing it sort of right! Thanks!

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Bio

I am a sarcastic perfectionist, a computer nerd, a game geek, an avid reader, a gadget guru, a wine (and tea) enthusiast, and (in my spare time) a chemist.

As I mentioned, I am a chemist, research and development to be exact, so when evaluating tea, it is much like evaluating my products: I will find the flaws and do my very best to fix them because it is what I love to do. Along those lines, nothing is perfect, but can have perfect qualities, I will highlight those also.

I made a preliminary guide to my rating scale:
0-19 – Did not like anything about the tea, feel it cannot be saved without being reformulated.
20-40 – Did not like the tea, it can be saved with extreme amounts of tweaking (i.e., sugar, milk, honey and or blending with another tea)
41-60 – Neutral about the tea, it can be helped or hurt by additives or blends, varied temperatures and steep times
61-70 – Decent tea, needs a little bit of help to get it in the place I like it, but definitely not out of reach
71-80 – Quality tea, liked it, will try again
81-90 – Really enjoyed the tea, high quality, will continue to drink the tea, not looking for something better
91-100 – Loved the tea, will continue to brew and drink and spread the word about the tea to everyone

Location

NJ

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