300 Tasting Notes

30
drank Queen Catherine by Harney & Sons
300 tasting notes

Today is quite the daunting tasting note day – first I take on Tribute, and now this?

In this case, however, we can just go ahead and blame my complete lack of interest in plain blacks. There is exactly one such previous review by me on all of Steepster, namely this one: http://steepster.com/clareborn/posts/185089

So I suppose I could have just left this in the box, but the same thing always happens – time passes, and I forget my resolve to just avoid unflavoured blacks altogether, and there I am again, with a cup of something that seemed intriguing.

The Queen is special, though – she’s all over my dash and I really had to see what all the fuss was about. Unlike the Nine Dragon Golden Needle tea previously reviewed, I didn’t enjoy the scent of the dry tea at all. The base tea simply isn’t for me. One day I need to talk to Dinosara or Sil or whoever else it is who’s so unfathomably knowledgeable about which leaf is which and why and how, because I’m completely lost beyond, ‘Oh, I tend to enjoy Mariage Frères black base tea, and, uh, also Lupicia’s green base tea, which people keep telling me is something commonly referred to as a ‘sencha’, whatever that means.’

Seriously – that is all the game I’ve got.

No, the dry tea doesn’t do it for me, and neither does the brewed liquid, neither nose-, nor taste-wise. This is one of those that make me feel like I’m licking a seat belt in our old Mercedes – I know I’ve gone there before, with the hot plastic and the scorching summer sun and the scent of all that heat and how the belt half-burned my exposed skin as my mother buckled me in.

I don’t want to drink our old Mercedes.

Also I’m quite the convinced anti-monarchist, so this Queen business will really have to be conducted elsewhere. (Unless we’re talking about some delicious dudes in drag, because if so, bring them on.)

More for the rest of you.

[Sample from the second round of the EU Travelling Box, spring 2014.]

Preparation
Boiling 3 min, 0 sec
keychange

Oh my!! and I’m a fairly staunch anti-monarchist here also, so perhaps we can bond over that—and not our affair with this tea.

Ysaurella

for a French, monarchy in 21th Century sounds really weird. You know the kind of murderers we are…even if our president’s role is typically a King’s role…we are crazy !

Kat_Maria

Oh my gosh! I love this freakin’ tea :D Good to know you’re not interested in plain black teas, though, before I intend to swap you any ;D

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75
drank Tribute by THE O DOR
300 tasting notes

Okay, so you remember that Thé d’amandine (Comptoir des thés et des épices) review that prompted Ysaurella, our resident fairy godmother of The O Dor tea samples to offer some up in the first place? Well, I do.

I’ve been so curious about this one – I mean, a comment such as, “Tribute by Theodor is cleary THE galette des rois tea” makes it impossible to resist, after all. And yes, this is one of those cases where – if I’d had this one first – I would have been head over heels, placing an order within the week. But now I have two very positive experiences with other almondy teas, one of them a staple in my cupboard (Pleine Lune) and the other one (Thé d’amandine) a tea I’ve vowed to re-review more generously, seeing as I was so fed up with French greens when I tried it.

This is a black tea, though, and as such more closely comparable to Pleine Lune. Quite unfairly, seeing as the MF tea is one that makes me want to put a leash on and kneel before my master. Tribute strikes me as less complex in taste, with a mouthfeel that comes off as a little watery to me, compared to the creamy smoothness of PL.

In the case of Thé d’amandine, it had the added bonus of being a green tea, and as such lighter and more accessible. It also brought some element of surprise to the table, through the addition of that distant, near-spectral cherry presence.

Tribute, however, doesn’t leave much of an impression on me.

I’m very torn here – on the one hand I feel like it’s close to sacrilege to rate this less than the seemingly obligatory 80+, but on the other, I’m really grateful for knowing exactly what I’m looking for. That knowledge, however, would be impossible if not for all this tea sampling – thank you so much, Ysaurella! I’ve had such a good time with these samples, and you really are the sweetest for helping me explore my feelings for the ravishing Monsieur Théodor.

[Sample from Ysaurella, spring 2014.]

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 3 min, 30 sec
Ysaurella

you are absolutely right Tribute is not as complex blend as Pleine Lune can be. It is very different to me, not comparable really to my loving MF favourite blend.

Anna

Have you tried the Thé d’amandine? I forget if you’re at all keen on green teas.

cteresa

Tribute is kinda of one note, well it is one note – almond and marzipan. So totally different from Pleine Lune or Je t´aime. But sometimes I am in the mood for solos.

Tribute is IMO just awesome as a digestif tea (not sure there is any such thing, well me, I use tea as digestif and some are much better for that use than others!)

Ysaurella

never had thé d’amandine. I am open to greens but they shouldn’t have any bitterness otherwise I drop the cup…I am terrible with greens :)

Anna

We’ll see what I come up with for your samples… starts plotting

Ysaurella

ahaha I love these kind of plots !

Anna

Hehehe.

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55
drank Samouraï by Mariage Frères
300 tasting notes

I remember reading cteresa’s note for this four months back and laughing so hard at the following, “…have no idea why they call it samourai, I can´t think of anything less samurai like than this tea.”

Now I’m sitting here with the remaining half of her hard-earned sample – there’s no way I can top the sheer hilarity of her review, though, so I’m not even going to try.

Scent wise, this is very lotion-from-l’Occitane, in other words, absolutely not for me. Smelling this for more than five minutes would give me a headache – it’s too medicinal. Brewed, it’s not so bad at all, much less lotiony, with hints of citrus, and with the tea base (which is quite nice) coming through distinctly. There’s a jubilant, grassy, vegetable note in there, too – I’m guessing it’s the MF bergamot – I’ve never tried theirs before.

In the cup, this just blooms. It’s very floral, and I like floral. I wouldn’t go as far as to call this a complex tea, but the tea base adheres to MF’s usual high standard (although it tastes surprisingly green to me) and I’m not having any problems finishing the cup. I also wouldn’t turn down a second cup, but I wouldn’t buy it – it simply isn’t something I crave as a staple. Maybe it’s because I’m just not samurai material.

Thanks, cteresa, for letting me try the least samurai-like tea in the world.

[Spin-off sample from the second round of the EU Travelling Box, spring 2014.]
[Sample polished off in Rome, February 2014.]

Preparation
Boiling 3 min, 0 sec
cteresa

Can you imagine serving this to a samurai? it´s so girly…..

Though dunno, for some reason the french (and I think mostly the french) have this whole tibetan – monks – tibetan monks naming for floral vanilla earl greys. I don´t know how accurate that is, but you got these elegant flowery teas named after Tibet and monks, maybe this is a spin off?

Glad you enjoyed it somewhat! That missing sample from the box had fallen right next to this one, had forgotten about this and thought it was a sign to liberate this!

Anna

It was definitely a sign – I remember considering asking you for the remaining half of the sample when I read the review, but I forgot. Probably too busy laughing very hard.

And I would definitely serve girly things to a samurai. Forcing preconceived, stereotypical masculinity on guys is so last year. Also let’s not forget about the onna-bugeisha, the badass warrior ladies!

cteresa

But the problem of serving it to samurai is not because it is girly, it is because it is so fussy, sooo too many flowers. I was samurai aesthetic all more ascetic, purer, more simple. I would serve Adele H to a samurai I think – black with peach and pepper. Something elegant but elegant simple, not elegant fussy.

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50

In addition to Butiki’s Three Friends, this is the chocolate-orange tea I most often see on my dash, so I wanted to try it out.

The scent of the dry tea has a tang that balances precariously between candied orange peel and artificial orange – it can’t quite make up its mind. Brewed, it gains a dimension of chalkiness – I’d say this is a recurring problem with chocolate-flavoured anything, but in this case it’s a little too present to be agreeable.

When it comes to the flavour, though, it’s surprisingly good at first – I would definitely eat this if it were a cakey or steamed pudding-y dessert. The chalkiness comes back in the aftertaste, however – not quite with a vengeance, but it’s undeniably there, accompanied by the half-candied, half-artificial orange.

For the second time today, hence, I conclude that chocolate teas aren’t really for me.

Thanks for sharing, KittyLovesTea!

[Sample from the second round of the EU Travelling Box, spring 2014.]

Preparation
Boiling 3 min, 0 sec
Ysaurella

Chocolate teas are not among my top list neither. Finding a very good one is rare and I appreciate to have found some like Thé du Loup and wedding Impérial

Ysaurella

and celebration ! :)

Anna

See, Wedding Impérial is perfection, in my opinion – but that’s not a chocolate to me, as much as it is a malt.

Ysaurella

it’s a caramelly chocolate tea ;)

Anna

Yeah, it’s WI’s fault I started trying chocolate teas again – but it has to be that kind of cocoa-esque, deep, dark, malty chocolate… and it’s the only one I’ve found. Not that I need another, now that I have WI. <3

cteresa

There is also American Breakfast… I love American Breakfast, for me it is a chocolate tea, though I think supposedly it has no chocolate (though seriously, it HAS to have).

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45
drank Monk's Blend by English Tea Store
300 tasting notes

This will be an uncharacteristically short tasting note, because this is so nondescript. It both looks and smells good in the bag – nice big leaf with petals, vaguely sweetfruity scent.

In the cup, though, it just sort of… sits. Sure, there’s a vague fruitness about it, and a subtle vanilla I think Angrboda might possibly like, but then there’s also a slight burnt note I don’t like at all. I think it’s the tea base. The aftertaste is the best part of the sip, but no, this is not really for me. I don’t like fruity blacks much in the first place, but I will keep sampling, because there has to be one I enjoy.

Just not this one.

Thanks for sharing, KittyLovesTea!

[Sample from the second round of the EU Travelling Box, spring 2014.]

Preparation
Boiling 3 min, 0 sec
Angrboda

Yes, I’m also coming to the conclusion that anything you rate low will probably be right up my alley. :p We don’t have matching tastes, we have opposite tastes.

Anna

I know, right? It’s surprisingly helpful!

Angrboda

I just found this post again and I LOLed so much! And I quote, “which Angrboda will probably like”
I’m drinking it now and thinking omnomnomnom!

I’m not getting any burnt-ness from the base, but then again, I never make flavoured blacks with boiling water either, so that might make the difference. I feel flavours perform better for me with around 90°C.

Anna

Hahaha. Oh man. It NEVER FAILS.

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75
drank Rouge d'Automne by Mariage Frères
300 tasting notes

The rooibos version of this is one of my favourite reds, so I had to try the black. It has very little to do with the familiar one in my cupboard, though.

Scent wise, the dry tea has a thick, buttery richness to it that I recognized so well but couldn’t quite place. And then it struck me. Rice porridge. In Sweden we make a difference between rice porridge (runnier) and rice pudding (baked in the oven, more of a cake-like texture) and the former is mainly served as a traditional Christmas dish, warm, with milk, and with cinnamon and sugar sprinkled on top.

It can be a bit of a hassle to make the actual porridge, as it easily burns (the rice is cooked in milk) – my mom has a sneaky trick, though; she takes it off the heat after it comes to a boil, and then wraps the whole thing in blankets to keep it warm until it’s time for Christmas dessert. It usually rests for five or six hours, which allows the rice to slowly cook and swell. Unwrapped, the porridge has the perfect texture and temperature, and it’s seriously the best trick ever.

And this is exactly what it smells like, on Christmas Eve, when that lid is removed.

I’m pretty sure the rice porridge effect is what’s supposed to pass for marrons glacés, but I haven’t had those since I was very small, so the rice layer is simply much further up in my memory stack.

The tea base is very pleasant, classic Mariage Frères, and I know this is one that would have appealed to me immensely if there hadn’t been such an outlandish scent/flavour parallel. As it is, I don’t really know how to feel about the whole thing. Every other sip is, ‘I like it..’, and every other, ‘…but it’s weird.

Thanks for adding this and messing with my head, cteresa!

[Sample from the second round of the EU Travelling Box, spring 2014.]

Preparation
Boiling 3 min, 0 sec
Ysaurella

the vanilla is very very present as well in this blend, did you get it as well ?

Anna

No, not at all – I was completely confused by the mentions of vanilla in the tasting notes when I read them.

I think it might be because there’s no vanilla in rice porridge, and hence, logically, this couldn’t taste like vanilla, according to my brain.

I would have liked to get the vanilla, though. I would.

Ysaurella

too bad, to me this really a pure candied chestnut ad vanilla tea. If you have enough, maybe try a second time with 90°c and 4 or 5 minutes.

Angrboda

_ she takes it off the heat after it comes to a boil, and then wraps the whole thing in blankets to keep it warm until it’s time for Christmas dessert_

It’s the only proper way! It’s not Christmas if there hasn’t been a large pot tucked into the footend of the bed. ‘Hay box’ we call it, although most people don’t actually have access to a box full of hay these days.(We serve it in Denmark as ris ala mande though. Add vanilla, sugar, whipped cream and plenty of chopped almonds and most importantly one whole almond.)

Anna

Ysaurella – I might, but at the same time I’d like for more people in the swap group to be able to try it. We’ll see!

Haha, I’m glad you understand, Ang.

In Sweden a lot of people do ‘Ris à la Malta’ – vanilla, sugar, whipped cream and tinned mandarin oranges. I just read on Wikipedia that the ‘à la Malta’ is an alleged bastardization of the ‘alamande’, which in its turn obviously comes from ‘à l’amande’. Learnings.

Nattie

Ooooooh this sounds so good! Chestnut is one of my absolute favourite flavours in tea, fingers crossed there’s some left when I get the box! (:

(But if you want it, go ahead)

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95
drank Je T'Aime by THE O DOR
300 tasting notes

Oh, okay, wow. So I’m having quite the The O Dor sample party today, courtesy of Ysaurella, cteresa and the EU swap box. Before yesterday, I was a The O Dor virgin, but things are getting pretty depraved pretty fast over here.

All these preconceived notions of what I’m going to like are so often completely turned on their heads when I try out a brand new company. I thought Lupicia’s blacks would be insufferable (but it turns out they’re just as amazing as their greens and oolongs) and I thought Butiki’s flavoured teas would be right up my alley (turns out I prefer the plain ones) and I thought I’d like Damman Frères far more than Comptoir des Thés et des Epices (a million times no).

And here I was, convinced this tea would be just average, and that Celebration would have to be the most desirable in the entire The O Dor kingdom.

As it turns out, I realized chocolate teas don’t really do it for me, even if there’s hazelnut and vanilla involved… and that this tea is gorgeous. Seriously, the last time I had a tea experience like this was with Lupicia’s Cookie. (And you all know how I feel about Cookie.)

I did a double take smelling the sample, because it was so rich and lovely. I always talk about the wild card, that inexplicable something, and there it was, in the dry tea already. And this teal is solid and reliable, because that something stays there all the way, both scent wise and flavour wise. There’s a perfect, creamy intermingling of coconut and pistachio, with an aftertaste that is all smooth vanilla with this slight floral hint that literally makes me smile.

My mnemonic analogy (there always seems to be one hard-wired into some part of my brain, after all) emanates from memories of love, suitably. When you’ve been in love, and you’ve loved, and you think you’ve got it all figured out, and then you meet that goddamn person who just turns everything upside down and shows you what all those stupid songs and books and movies were really about.

Je T’aime – the evolution of love, in a tea cup.

(You will be my special coconut and pistachio tea forever.)

[Sample from the second round of the EU Travelling Box, spring 2014.]

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 3 min, 30 sec
__Morgana__

I have a bunch of The O Dor and this is making me want to break them out.

Sil

this makes me miss the du loup…

Anna

Do it, Morgana, I want to read your notes.

Oh, Sil, you and your wolfbrew. Cherchez le loup!

Ysaurella

I had a sample of this one thanks to cteresa. Unfortunately I didn’t love it as such as I thought but need to give a second try.You brew it hoter than I did and it may do the difference

Anna

Then again, you get more mileage out of Celebration. I brewed them more or less the same, but this one seems less sensitive, somehow.

Terri HarpLady

I don’t think I’ve tried any, or very many, or The O Dor’s teas. Now I want to.

Ysaurella

we can arrange this easily Terri, just let me know

Sil

..uh i think you should send teas to terri…through me…yeaaaah..that’s it. ;)

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75
drank Celebration by THE O DOR
300 tasting notes

This has been a bit of a revelation, to be honest – I have come to a realization. I’m just going to come right out and say it. I don’t need chocolate teas in my life.

Honestly, that’s pretty huge on a tea preferences scale, seeing as I love everything else chocolate. Seriously – chocolate is where it’s at.

But in a tea? No. I think this reflects my shift in tea preferences lately – I find myself craving lighter, greener, fruitier, less desserty teas. It might very well be a spring thing, but it’s definitely here to stay for now.

That much said, this is a deliciously elegant tea. I wouldn’t say the chocolate tea to end all other chocolate teas, because there are several flavour layers here, and a definite complexity beyond just the chocolate, but it’s definitely one of the better chocolates I’ve tried, if not the best. (Chocolate-orange will always have a special place in my heart, though.)

Nose wise, it jumps from lush in the bag to a little bland in the cup, but the flavour lands on the lush side of things.

Hazelnut, vanilla and chocolate are the three main taste notes for me, but in no particular order – this is a very playful brew, as each sip stacks the flavour chips a little differently. I’m sure this would kill with a dash of milk or cream, and as usual, I’m happy I never keep those in my fridge, because this would have gotten pretty decadent pretty fast.

It’s hard to rate this one, so keep in mind that this really is an excellent tea of its kind, and that my grade reflects preference rather than quality.

Many thanks to Ysaurella for not only letting me try some The O Dor, but helping me address complex existe(a)ntial quandaries in the process.

[Sample from Ysaurella, spring 2014.]

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 3 min, 30 sec
Sil

nice! I’m not a huge fan of chocolate teas either… but give me caramel or let me die! haha

cteresa

This is nice but for some reason their The du Loup is my own ultimate chocolate tea

The o dor makes two black chocolate and hazelnut teas, and manages to make them both totally different in personality. The wolf tea is pretty special to me – sadly am out. It was the tea I ran out of the fastest ever!

Anna

Haha, I just read your reviews of Celebration and the wolf tea, cteresa.

cteresa

I tend to love better the first version I try, and the wolf was the first. But even so, I think The du Loup is a “special” tea. I was in Theodor´s adorable bijou little tea store in Paris and when I started to mention I wanted more of their chocolate tea the very lovely saleslady went “aahhhhh, thé du loup……” with an infatuated smile…

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80
drank Jamaïque by Mariage Frères
300 tasting notes

Right, so how do I even explain the origin of this sample? Well, we’re doing the second round of the EU swap box, and cteresa forgot to put one of the samples she wanted to send out in the box… so she sent an envelope, too, a few days later. Of course, seeing as cteresa is cteresa (i.e. completely awesome) she added even more tea samples (hey, empty envelope, gotta fill it).

Among these were a couple that I’ve been dying to try, including this one. I have a pretty decent MF reseller here, but they haven’t had Jamaïque in stock since I moved back.

My prediction for this tea was that it would be like Vanille des Iles with a twist – and yes, that’s more or less what I find myself with here. Scent wise, there’s much more caramel in VdI, making for a rounder, sweeter profile. In terms of Jamaïque, though, there is this perfect, boozy note topping off the vanilla base. The same goes for the brewed tea, even though I find myself struggling more with flavour recollection than scent recollection this time around. In short, however – Jamaïque fronts less caramel and more booze.

It’s a very enjoyable, smooth cup, but just as in the case of VdI, I would have enjoyed a more exuberant vanilla presence.

Thank you, cteresa!

[Spin-off sample from the second round of the EU Travelling Box, spring 2014.]

Preparation
Boiling 3 min, 0 sec
cteresa

You are welcome! Can’t believe I had not spotted this on your shopping list before sending the box

And uh got to make my own taste note of it as well

Anna

It was so nice to finally get to try it, thanks again. And GASP! You have not yet produced a tasting note for this? Oh, cteresa.

cteresa

I was in a hurry! and was in a hurry the next time I had it, and then had tea box samples to try, and a quest to finish teas. But yes been very bad at not making taste notes for this, will have to fix it soon.

cteresa

Also part of the problem is, I think those two first brews are made were not fair trials, and I should be able to get more out of this. I adore the scent, sooo boozy and decadent, but was a bit disappointed in taste. Got to tweak those brewing parameters.

Ysaurella

the tea base is really different vs Vanille des îles.
This one is a strong assam which turns bitter with long steeps.
Jamaïque’s main host is really rhum to me and the strong personnality of its tea base

Anna

I’m going to try to brew it longer and cooler, Ysaurella-style next time, to see if it gets even better.

Anna

I meant shorter, feh.

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85

So a while back I received some samples from the ever-lovely Ysaurella, but I have neither been in possession of the time nor the faculties for note writing until now, so the samples have had to wait patiently. In very pretty air-tight containers, though, so they haven’t exactly been languishing.

My benefactress had recommended 75C for 3-4 minutes, so I went with 80C (my kettle only does increments of ten) a brief cooling off period, and then a three-minute steep.

In the bag already, it is quite clear this is an exquisite green – I had to force myself to brew it fearlessly, as the scent of the sample was so delicate and complex the risk to lose some small delicious note along the way seemed overwhelming.

But, in the end, I managed to keep my hands steady and my timing timely.

In the cup, the complexity of the dry tea prevails. For me, the notes most present taste wise are apple and date. The apple in particular is interesting – it can’t really make up its mind. Is it a red apple? Is it a green apple? Is it a special fairytale multiplex apple? Possibly, possibly, and possibly.

All in all this is a very pleasant tea, with a light, rosey aftertaste. I have synesthetic tendencies, and this tastes the colour of green marzipan. I see the cake from my 25th birthday (and many other birthdays, I admit I do love my princess cake) as I sip.

Thank you so much, Ysaurella!

[Sample from Ysaurella, spring 2014.]

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 3 min, 0 sec
Ysaurella

you’re very welcome :) I’m happy you loved it. It is surely a lovely blend, very sensitive and dedicated to the old Istanbul…

Anna

I’m going back there in a couple of months – maybe I should have saved the rest of my sample for the trip, to drink it in its proper milieu? Alas, I must admit I really wanted to try it iced, so I’m cold-steeping the rest now.

cteresa

I love this one, I think it is a rebuy (when I next have the chance to restock Theodor teas, which might take a while). For me it´s the perfect Hammam tea, and while nothing can compare to a proper Hammam (Anna, go the evening you arrive and whenever you get the chance), it is nicer than the regular turkish tea served there!

Ysaurella

lucky you Anna, Instanbul seems lovely, I’d love to visit it.

Anna

It’s a research trip, so all work and no play this time around, I’m afraid. It’s up there on the list (together with Paris, of all places) of destinations-where-both-me-and-my-husband-have-spent-a-lot-of-time-but-never-actually-together, though. We’ll see!

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Profile

Bio

I’m going to try all the teas.

Then I will choose a lucky few perfect specimens, and we will live happily together in my tea cupboard.

Forever.

  • * *

2014

This year, all bets are off. I am going to drink both peppermint and chamomile and possibly suffer a little. But it’s okay – it’s for science.

I’m doing Project Jasmine, Project Peach and Project Unflavoured Green.

In terms of flavoured teas, Lupicia and Mariage Frères have become my massive favourites, and I have learned that Dammann Frères/Fauchon/Hédiard and Butiki aren’t really for me.

The O Dor, Adagio and Comptoir des thés et des épices are all on this year’s I’d like to get to know you better list.

2013

Getting back into tea drinking last fall, I was all about rooibos. This past spring has been all green tea, all the time, with some white additions over the summer. Currently attempting a slow, autumnal graduation to black teas. Oolongs are always appropriate.

The constant for me, flavour wise, is the strong presence of fruity and floral notes. Vanilla is lush, as long as it’s not artificial. Peach, berries, mango. Cornflower, rose, lavender.

No peppermint.

No chamomile.

No cinnamon.

Ever.

  • * *

My ratings don’t reflect the ‘What does this tea do for me?’ standard, but rather my own ‘What would I do for this tea?’ scale.

100-90
My absolute favourites. Teas I would travel for – or, in any case, pay exuberant postage for, because they simply have to be in my cupboard. Generally multi-faceted teas with complex scents and flavours. Teas with personality. Tricky teas.

89-80
Teas I wouldn’t hesitate to buy again if and when I came across them. Tea purchases I would surreptitiously weave into a travel itinerary (Oh! A Lupicia store! Here?! My word!).

79-70
Teas I enjoyed, but don’t necessarily need to make any kind of effort to buy again.

69-0
Varying degrees of disinterest and contempt.

Location

Rome, Italy

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