Camellia Sinensis

Recent Tasting Notes

99

Absolutely loving this tea. I’ve brewed it on a few occasions now and I can definitely see why people call Darjeeling the “champagne of teas”. This totally reminds me of champagne!

It’s so light, delicate, muscatel, and the other fruit/floral notes combine well. Everything here is in harmony, I couldn’t ask this tea to preform any better. Savoured each sip until the last drop.

Very happy I had a chance to try this out. Of course their book (Tea: History, Terroirs, Varieties) hyped it up a bit so I was itching to get my hands on it. ;)

1 tsp, 250ml water, 1 steep

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 3 min, 0 sec

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100

Wow, this is divine! Take everything I have ever loved about white teas, mix it with the flavour intensity of a first flush darjeeling, and that’s mostly how I feel about this one. I get tasty notes of pepper, and I can also find the hazelnut. Not as sure about the cocoa butter, but there is so much more to this tea. Every sip is so precious, it’s the perfect ending to a few days loaded with food!

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 4 min, 0 sec

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78

This tea is buttery and tastes lilac. It is good occasionally, not an everyday tea for me, but I like it really much. The lilac taste always surprise me. It is a tea you need to smell before drinking it, it absolutely changes the taste.

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100

I absolutely love this tea. The taste is really mild but refreshing. The kind of tea that makes you feel relax and zen.

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 7 min, 0 sec

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83

I was really thrilled when I got this tea as a gift! The idea of drinking a 1991 aged tea thrilled me, I think it’s a pretty special thing to do. To think this tea was picked when I was 5 years of age seems crazy when I take the time to think about it! So I wanted to treat this tea with as much respect as I possibly could, make sure to take the time to appreciate the different layers every sip offers. Sadly, as much as I appreciate the fact it is very special and different, I’m not sure about the flavour of the charcoal… it’s not too bad. If I concentrate, I can picture the coffee… maybe a bit of dark chocolate. I sadly didn’t get the sweet and fruity aftertaste they mention at all though. I was actually very much looking forward to the charcoal taste combined with that of the actual tea, but sadly, I don’t get much oolong at all, to me this is mostly charcoal. It does get better as I re-steep and the leaves uncurl more (they never uncurl much though, even after 5 steeps, they seem pretty stuck from all the charcoal coating), but never enough to make me go “yum!”.

I still thought trying this tea was a great experience, the taste is interesting, and every sip is a sort of link to the past… I think that’s pretty cool! But I won’t go buying more of it, especially given the crazy price.

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 3 min, 0 sec

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83
politicalmachine

any thoughts about this? was thinking of picking some up

Eisenherz

it was my first charcoal tea ever so I have no comparison point… but make sure you like the idea of a charcoal/smoky taste, because it’s pretty intense – more so than the dry smell suggests! however, after my first 2 cups, I started enjoying it more and noticing the subtleties of the oolong behind the charcoal taste. interestingly, probably because of the charcoal coating, the leaves barely open in the infuser. I found it got better as I re-steeped it; I liked the 3rd steep best, but I’m not sure if it’s because I got to enjoy the charcoal taste more with time, or if it’s because it got less overwhelming with ever steep. not sure if that helps you deciding, it probably also depends on how familiar you are with charcoal teas. if you haven’t had any, going for this is a bit daring (I got mine as a present for my birthday) but you might end up liking it. if you’re familiar with them and like them, I assume this is a good one, but I can’t help much comparing!

politicalmachine

great, thanks! I was just interested in an aged oolong to try out and this one seemed to be the oldest (and cheapest) that CS offers. I’d imagine though that the first few steeps should be very short given the nature of the tea, it would make sense to treat it more as a pu-erh in my opinion. Aged oolongs are usually reroasted every year to keep them dry so this one would have underwent many roastings. I think my curiosity would lead me to eventually getting this or something similar to it just to try it out.

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91

Finally got a chance to try this, even though I think I’ve had it for almost a week now. When I saw this online I jumped at the opportunity to buy some because I loved the spring 2011 version so much. And usually my husband takes black tea for work, so he was also excited to try it.

After brewing it up 6 times, we agreed that it was a very good oolong and stands up to the previous version we tried. So if CS keeps stocking Ali Shan by Mr. Chen we will keep buying it. ;)

125ml yixing teapot, 1 generous tsp, 6 steeps

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 30 sec
SimpliciTEA

Dorothy: I am glad you chose to review Camellia Sinensis. I have checked out
their website after I read that they were recommended by Heiss and Heiss in their book, The Tea Enthusiast. I vaguely remember their teas being on the pricy side (at least from my point of view), but I do remember being impressed at the selection and the amount of information they provide about each tea.

Dorothy

Yeah some of their teas are pricey. I’ve tried most of their Chinese black teas, and even some of the cheapest options are very tasty though.

Isabella Luna Gadbois

It is the best tea house in Montreal! Their collection of tea is amazing, the tea house beside the boutique is awesome and very relaxing and the staff are very knowledgeable and NICE. And they also have a tea school offering a large variety of classes :) I LOVE this place and recommend it to everyone. :)

Isabella Luna Gadbois

You should try this one also, it is cooked directly at Camellia and is really good ! http://steepster.com/teas/camellia-sinensis/23609-dong-ding-mr-chang-cooked

Dorothy

I’ll have to try some next time it’s in stock. :D

SimpliciTEA

Cool, and great to know. Thanks!

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87
drank Xiao Zhong by Camellia Sinensis
318 tasting notes

So lately I have been looking through my tasting notes and finding which teas do not have short steeping notes. I don’t write about every cup of tea I brew, but I like to make one note for long steeps and one note for short steeps. Anyway,

I brewed this tea today and the flavours were pretty consistent up until the third or fourth cup. It doesn’t keep the main flavour of one long steep, but it’s similar enough. And then came the expected downward spiral of weakening tea flavour, but what really shocked me was the CIGAR aroma in my fifth cup.

Whoa whoa whoa, what?!?!

I’m not disgusted or anything but it’s a strange thing to suddenly appear in my tea. I’ve tried some young raw puerh before and that’s given me a similar cigar aroma.

Okay so with these turn of events I had to keep resteeping. The sixth cup had an even stronger cigar aroma. I mean there is a hint of the original tea flavours but this was completely unexpected. By the time I got to the seventh cup the cigar aroma was almost completely gone. I kept resteeping it but the eighth and ninth cups were so weak and full of my original water flavour.

What a weird experience… I almost want to believe my senses just felt like trolling me this morning. ;) I’ll have to try and redo this again sometime to see if I can duplicate the experience. (edit: Tried this short steeped at a later date and it still had the cigar aroma with 5-6)

100ml gaiwan, 2 tsp, 9 steeps (30s + 15s resteeps)

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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87
drank Xiao Zhong by Camellia Sinensis
318 tasting notes

The tea description for this is spot on; malty, nutty, chocolatey. And with each sip I take, the flavour really builds up and becomes heavy in my mouth.

Of course there is no real chocolate in this, but that is why I find it so enjoyable. Whenever I buy flavoured tea with chocolate in it, I’m almost always disappointed. I just hate the sensation of drinking melted chocolate mixed with tea. Something about the consistency and sweetness of the brew makes me feel like a glutton (and not in a good way).

Enough ranting, I don’t have a sweet tooth but I do like this tea quite a bit. It’s sweet, but not too sweet (sometimes Bai Lin black tea and Oriental Beauty oolong tea are too sweet for my tastes). I can definitely see this as a good tea to drink during the winter. The rich sweet/earthy characteristics and heavy body are something I find pleasant in tea during this season. As a bonus, this tea appears to be very light so even my 50g bag fills a lot of space. So it should take me a while to go through all of this. Woot! :)

For recommendations, if you enjoyed CS’ Huiming Hong Cha or their Hualien Feng Mi, you will like Xiao Zhong (or vice versa).

200ml glass teapot, 1 generous teaspoon, 1 steep

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 3 min, 0 sec

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99

Tonight I’m brewing SML in a gaiwan, because I’ve yet to short steep it until now. Anyway,

First steep starts off tasting very mild and friendly, then after a few seconds a rush of flavour comes out. I’m getting a hint of the unique SML flavours here, malt, zesty tomato, vanilla, grains, cinnamon

Second steep it obviously much stronger, with the typical powerful SML flavours showing up.

Sniffing gaiwan lid, the scents made me think of soy sauce and tomato.

Moving onto the third steep, it keeps getting more and more intense. Now there is a minty/menthol flavour coming out. It mixes really well with the existing flavours into something that makes me think of licorice.

At the fourth steep the tea leaves have completely unfurled. Tasting the liquor, the mint is more powerful, along with the existing flavours. I think this fourth cup really tests your tolerance for STRONG flavours.

The fifth steep tasted like the tea flavour was weakening, but it’s otherwise pretty strong.

Sixth to twelfth steeps continued to get progressively weaker, but otherwise I enjoyed the typical SML flavours.

I go into more depth with my earlier tasting note, but in summary: I love SML because it is such a unique tea.

This short steeping experiment worked out nicely, I think I prefer it to the traditional one steep western style. For one thing, I think the menthol/mint comes out better here. As a bonus, the long, twisted dark leaves are a delight to watch in a gaiwan, and the large open mouth of this tea vessel makes it great to sniff the wet leaves.

100ml gaiwan, 2 tsp, 12 steeps (30s, +15s resteeps)

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 30 sec
enjoy_the_pure

what is a gaiwan if i may ask?

Dorothy

Sure, it’s a small tea vessel that has the appearance of a lidded bowl. Using a gaiwan is ideal for short steeping tea because you fully decant the liquid and reserve tea leaves in it.
There are some great pictures on on wikipedia plus more information for you to look at if you are still curious: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaiwan

Feel free to ask anyone on Steepster for more information, most of us are happy to share what we know. :)

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99

Finally got around to trying this tea. I bought it a while ago but wanted to do a comparison tasting with the same type of tea from another vendor. Plus I wanted my husband around to give me his thoughts on the flavour.

Sniffing the lid of the tasting cups, we picked up on some unexpected flavours for a black tea.

Onto drinking them, the first cup (Jade Red sample from Life in Teacup) we tasted cherry, tomato, soft malt, barley, and a kind of leathery flavour (meant in a good way).

Then we drank from the other cup (Camellia Sinensis), here we tasted tomato, spices, raisin (minus sweetness) licorice, menthol sensation, soft malt, barley, and a kind of leathery flavour again. Sipping between both and thinking more about it, there is a wonderful heavy texture to both teas. In the aftertaste, much of the flavour remains and lingers for a good while.

This was a very unusual drinking experience. I have another Sun Moon Lake type from Life in Teacup, but it’s the small cultivar type, and they taste quite different!

Overall I love the flavours and the uniqueness it presents. However as much as I enjoy this tea, I wouldn’t drink it all the time, just as a nice treat. I would highly recommend trying this once, but it is an expensive tea so the smallest size possible is good. Make sure whoever you buy it from mentions T(aiwan)-18 cultivar or Jade Red, otherwise you may get the other type of Sun Moon Lake. (Personally I always buy small sizes, because I don’t know how much I’ll like the tea)

120ml comparison tasting cups, 2 tsp, 2 steeps

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 4 min, 0 sec

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85

I don’t usually short steep Indian teas because I normally buy the broken leaf type. But Nilgiri Coonoor has beautiful long twisted leaves, the sort you’d expect to see with oolong. So based on its appearance alone, I decided to do a few short steeps in my gaiwan.

It turned out to be a very good experiment, the first three steeps brought out a flavour that is more preferable to me. The liquor tastes very delicate, there is a nice hint of flowers and fresh fruit. So in a way, this tea now also reminds me of some notes found in white teas, but the tea body certainly tastes like Indian black tea.

From now on (time permitting), I will probably brew this one with short steeps. The longer steeps in a teapot/large vessel are nice but sometimes the tannins/bite offend my senses. That is just my preference, so I recommend experimenting with this one until you get a desirable cup of tea.

100ml gaiwan, 1 generous tsp, 3 steeps (+rinse, 30s, 10s resteeps)
Up’d rating because this method made the tea more pleasing.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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85

At first when I made this, I probably used too much leaf and not enough water. The result was overpowering and bitter. Anyway, I brewed a new batch in a tall glass mug with plenty of water (slightly more than 1 cup). Moving on to the tasting notes. ;)

Smelling the liquor on this second attempt, I feel relieved that it doesn’t smell bitter or pungent in any way. It has a nice floral scent, and the liquor is a light orange-yellow.

Taking my first sip, I’m again comforted in knowing I brewed this better. Drinking more, I taste something floral, spices, something like fuzzy peach, soft malty flavour, and light tea flavour. During the aftertaste a very floral lavender flavour lingers.

I never usually brew a full cup or more of water when I make tea, so I’ll keep that in mind when I brew this. Anyway, I’m very pleased with the results and it was entertaining to watch the long twisted leaves in a tall glass. Very good tea, it met and then exceeded my expectations.

290 ml of water in a glass mug, 2 tsp (hard to scoop the tea leaves, so I dunno), 1 steep

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 3 min, 0 sec

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91

I love the smell as it reminds me of smoked fish I used to enjoy back when I was a kid and thus not vegetarian. This tea for me is a grown up trip down memory lane.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 6 min, 0 sec

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89

Odd tea with warm, spicy nut notes. The type you keep for -32 degree celsius wheather. :)

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 4 min, 45 sec

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92

I don’t care what people will say I will always put soymilk and agave nectar in Darjeeling tea. It’s a phenomenal celebration tea.

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94

To me this smells like passion fruit and tastes like honey. Very well done.

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91

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83
drank Mayuan Shan by Camellia Sinensis
108 tasting notes

A mild celery sweetness that fills the mouth, but doesn’t blaze SWEET in the back-of-the-mouth like some Gao Shan oolongs (although I’m not really sure of the elevation of this tea). Very green tasting, with an bit of an energizing kick at the end. Dry aftertaste. Honeysuckle aroma in the leaf. Reminds me a lot of green San Lin She or fresh Pinglin Baozhong.

Infused in my light roast Yixing pot.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 1 min, 0 sec

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100

The apricot and artichoke flavor description is spot on. I always turn to this tea after running as it is very refreshing and energizing. I should try it cold or with agave very soon. Overall this is a quality white tea and the price is alright. I love this.

Preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 7 min, 0 sec

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