Life In Teacup

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Recent Tasting Notes

66

Not smoky enough for me. Prefer Golden Moon.

Preparation
Boiling 5 min, 0 sec

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66

Not smoky enough for me. Prefer Golden Moon.

Preparation
Boiling 5 min, 0 sec

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90

Ah… my sweet Oolong! This is delightful.

Rich, nutty, sweet and almost creamy. A silky mouthfeel that lasts only a few moments because the light astringency leaves the palate feeling clean.

I love Oriental Beauty (Bai Hao) Oolong teas because they have such an autumnal feel to them – warm and inviting and beautiful.

This is a fantastic Oriental Beauty. Thank you to TeaEqualsBliss for sending it my way!

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88

High Mountain awesome. Delicate, creamy and floral with a looooong hui gan of peaches and cream. All of the typical “greener style” oolong flavors are there but with an element of refinement as the wet leaf aroma comes through sweet and precise. The liquor is refreshingly bright and smooth that is balanced by a perfectly weighty mouthfeel and the tartness at the end unfurls slowly into the aforementioned sweet hui gan. High marks for this one.

ananna

I don’t know what a sweet hui gan is but I agree with everything else you said. I like way the flavor rolls around and the bursts of flavor end in that tartness as well.

cultureflip

hui gan (or huay gan) is the flavor of the air that returns from your throat after you have swallowed the tea. kind of like an aftertaste but it does not necessarily originate in the mouth. good teas have impressive hui gan. ive found that sometimes the flavor of the hui gan is reminiscent of the wet aroma of the tea. comes full circle, in a way.

cultureflip

hui gan (or huay gan) is the flavor of the air that returns from your throat after you have swallowed the tea. kind of like an aftertaste but it does not necessarily originate in the mouth. good teas have impressive hui gan. ive found that sometimes the flavor of the hui gan is reminiscent of the wet aroma of the tea. comes full circle, in a way.

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86

Been awhile since I’ve cupped a Mao Feng. Last one was a Keemun type. Before that, a couple of years since my last Mao Feng green. This was a crisp, wonderfully vegetal (but not spinachy) and creamy green with a pine note somewhere in the mix. I could easily draw comparison to pre-rain Long Jings as a flavor-sibling. Quite decent.

Full Review: http://www.teaviews.com/2011/02/18/review-life-in-teacup-pre-guyu-huang-shan-mao-feng-2/

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 2 min, 30 sec

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88

Finally got around to drinking this again, at work a few days ago. I keep trying to wait until I have time to pay attention to the brewing, but at that rate I’ll never drink it. So: I used enough leaves to thinly cover the bottom of my mug, and water slightly below boiling. I left the leaves in the mug, drank it when it was cool enough, and added more hot water when it was mostly empty. I probably steeped the leaves 3 or 4 times.

It was really good! Sweet, and nutty, and roasted. A little fruity. Very smooth. It went surprisingly well with the cashews I was snacking on at the time!

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 8 min or more

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88

Mmm, the dry leaves smell like coffee, and chocolate, and fall (that is, dry leaves :P). They’re big and pretty too, just like the picture. The flavor is more like an oolong than I expected – might try it with a shorter steep time, maybe even cooler water, because I’m getting a little tannic kick on the back end. It’s still quite smooth overall, though, roasty and warm; it almost tastes like a Darjeeling, actually, with that sharp roasted fruit flavor.

I used about a quarter of my 6g free sample (thanks Ginko!), so I’ll enjoy playing with this some more.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 3 min, 15 sec

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78
drank Yunnan Golden Bud by Life In Teacup
412 tasting notes

Had about a teaspoon and a half of this left, so I just threw it all into a mug and steeped it for five minutes.

There’s a nice, good Yunnan Tea smell to it. The taste is very mild, but drying on the tongue. It’s sort of a smooth bitter. I could use buttery to describe it, almost. Perhaps.

But anyways, that’s the last of that sample. Not a fan enough of Yunnan to order it. Besides, I’ve got lots of OTHER teas I would already like to buy from Life in Teacup. And many more I’d just like to grab a sample of.

Soon.

Preparation
Boiling 5 min, 0 sec

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78
drank Yunnan Golden Bud by Life In Teacup
412 tasting notes

Squishy leaves!

Otherwise, it’s very mild. I’m really not tasting very much.

Preparation
Boiling 4 min, 0 sec
Jillian

Squishy leaves?

AJ

Yes. They’re very soft when dry.

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78
drank Yunnan Golden Bud by Life In Teacup
412 tasting notes

Trying my first sample today. I had a bit of a crisis when I tried to tear open a corner of the package and ended up tearing it RIGHT IN HALF. Luckily I didn’t lose more than one or two leaves, and I happened to have an empty tin to dump the sample into.

The leaves were quite soft, which I wasn’t too sure about.

SMELLS like a Yunnan. I didn’t do any pre-rinse, just sort of threw myself into 1-minute-steeps. First is very mild, but still flavourful, and actually somewhat sweet. I don’t know what to say about it right now, except that it does remind me of the Yunnan I got from Tea Desire (only in that there is some similarity, but I can’t really tell what). It’s sweet, and there’s a sort of pepperyness in with the taste as well.

Second steep, only meant to do a minute and a half but wasn’t paying attention and let it hit two minutes. Ahwell. First sip I get tea sweetness; this steep’s definitely stronger. Still getting the sort of pepper in the aftertaste as well, although I don’t really know if pepper’s the right word for it, it was just the only one I could come up with.

Third steep (three minutes) has lost the sweetness a bit. Still lovely and mild.

Preparation
Boiling 1 min, 0 sec

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100

It probably didn’t help that I didn’t observe a typical gongfu prep for this. It also probably didn’t help that I was eating sharp cheddar-laden chimichangas at the time. That said, I brewed this as I would an oolong (but with boiling water), and it was a perfect sheng. Muscat grape notes, shades of maple leaf, pear, and some earthiness trailing on finish. When I think of aged sheng pu-erh, I think this. Flawless.

Thanks to seykayay for this little treasure.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 4 min, 30 sec
CMT 雲 山 茶

Mmmmm. Puerh Chimichanga. Maybe 52 teas will do something with that.

Geoffrey Norman

@Seykayay – Do it! Right this second!

@Cloud Mountain – Y’know…I would actually drink that. Heck, I had their bacon tea and liked it.

Batrachoid

How about arroz con habichuelas? What’s a savory dish more earthy and pu’erh friendly than the staple protein combo of the western hemisphere?

Geoffrey Norman

Can’t say I even know what that is.

Batrachoid

Sorry. I’m from Florida, so you might know it as arroz con frijoles? Also known as rice and beans.

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87

This fragrant, flavorful tea has captured the summer in its tightly furled deep green and olive tea leaves. It has sweet grassy and floral smells, and once infused is like drinking in the warm flavor of roasted nuts while breathing in the honeyed aroma of summer’s wild flowers.

This tea is awesome and very good. It’s quite resilient and would make a great everyday tea. For pictures and my full review: http://www.leafjoy.com/2010/12/taiwan-sweet-summer-oolong-life-in-teacup/

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92

This oolong surprised me in many ways. I did my best to mimic a Gongfu prep for it – somewhat to no avail – but still ended up with three twenty-second steeps of differing excellence. Common traits were a contrasted vegetal and fruity lean with little or no astringency. Worth a look…but definitely not an on-the-go tea. This requires ritual.

Full Review: http://www.teaviews.com/2011/01/05/review-life-in-teacup-dong-ding-oolong-traditional-greener-style-3/

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 30 sec
Jaime

Okay, since I’m an idiot/bumpkin that has no clue…can you tell me what gongfu prep is? I’ve yet to find a source that simply states the facts.

Gingko (manager of Life in Teacup)

Geoffrey, your 20-second steeps sound perfect gongfu to me :D

Geoffrey Norman

@Jamie – Truth is, I’m still a little lost on the details also. Just Wiki it to get a better idea. I have no clue how to do the actual ceremony.

@Ginkgo – I do my best. Wonderful product, sir.

Jaime

Okay, finally found a video for it that actually had the ceremony demonstrated/explained. I still kinda don’t get it. And I think I’m okay with that.

Gingko (manager of Life in Teacup)

I guess a lot of people wouldn’t agree with me on this. But I personally do NOT think there is “tea ceremony” in Chinese tea tradition. I think that’s a big difference between China and Japan in tea culture. Most of the Chinese ceremonies we see nowadays are for performance purposes, which is good, but isn’t essential in people’s tea life. Besides, everyone can have/create his own ceremony :D

Geoffrey Norman

That’s the first I’ve heard of that. Well, I’ll take that as a go-ahead to just do whatever I want. heh

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88

SIPDOWN!

I know I have had this one before because the bag was opened and half gone…must have forgotten to log Oooooops!

Anyhow…this one is VERY forgiving! I over infused by several minutes and it’s still YUMMY! It’s almost ‘crust’ tasting like toast. It has a sweeter finish. I think this is a nice tea!

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99

I call the taste “lilies”!!! I love all the comments on this tea, trying to explain its aroma and flavor and feeling. A few years ago I bought a bit of this type of tea from another source and at first I didn’t think I liked it, but then I found myself drawn back to trying it again and again. From the very first, my thoughts went to lilies. It tasted like lilies! Or how I would think they would taste based on their aroma. Smell a lily, it is pungent, strange, not unpleasant, but not sweet like other flowers. A lily is not as bitter smelling as a tulip. Originally the tea I bought did not mention charcoal, and I was new to oolongs, so the only thing I could use to decribe it was lilies. Every time I drank it, the vision of lilies got stronger. I grow lilies, Asian ones and daylilies and Easter lilies. The tall stalk lilies are stronger smelling, and when they are in bloom their aroma hits me every time I walk out my front door. The tea was my lilies! Soon I loved this tea so much that I hoarded it and was afraid to finish that last bit. Why? because the place I got it from didn’t have it anymore! They had something “similar”, but it was awful compared to my beloved “lily tea”. It was bitter, and not of lilies, and could not take multiople infusions. Then I found Gingko Bay on ebay. They had samplers of many oolongs, and with some lovely discussions I chose my samples. Tada!!! here are my lilies!!! The it is it, and in fact, even better as I still did have a little of my old tea left and compared them., This one was smoother and lingered better. So I finished off that last bit of old tea and am on to a new, better tea and a great source, lifeinteacup.com (or ginkgo bay on ebay).
In the winter, when the lilies are sleeping, I can drink their aroma with this tea, and think of the next coming june! You can all have your charcoal, I will be drinking lilies! :)

PS – this tea can take sitting in the yixing pot for long periods without getting too bitter for me, and this is an important trait for me. I start sipping it at 5-6 minutes or later, and continue for as long as 30 minutes or until it is gone. I don’t even mind it cool. Then I re-infuse. If I infuse a third time, I may add a few fresh pieces to perk it up a bit, I like my lilies to produce a full bouquet!

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 6 min, 0 sec

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98

This is the second Yunnan gold I’ve ever tried, and – man – does this type of black (or red) tea have a track record. I don’t know what sort of alchemy goes into making these, but you won’t find a tea that translates from sight, to smell, to taste with such consistency. It looks gold from leaf to liquor; it smells and tastes like creamed almonds or unroasted, buttered barley. Aside from an almost-negligible astringent note in the middle, I am hard-pressed to find a flaw.

Full Review: http://www.teaviews.com/2010/12/24/review-life-in-teacup-yunnan-golden-bud-3/

Preparation
Boiling 3 min, 0 sec

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82

Backlogging from yesterday…this was a nice cup. It didn’t taste as charcoal-like as I thought it would. I would say mostly in the end of the sip and on to the aftertaste if anything. It was slightly juicy , but not overly so. I think my favorite of the 3 would have to be the Superior version to this and the regular. All I can think of when I see this name of tea is someone saying “Fo’ Sho’” Like “Do you Love tea?” “Fo-Show!”

I need some sleep! I’m starting to get silly!
LOL

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83

Lovely! Had 3 cups today…3 separate infusions…must say I prefer the Superior tho! This is still yummy tho…backlogging because it’s been a bear of a day…

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78

Sweet and pungent . . . black cherry chocolate in the wet leaf aroma that gives way to burnt bittersweet florals in the liquor. This is an excellent example of “rock tea” (yan cha) because, amidst the sweet, chocolaty subtlety, the mineral core is undisguised and prevalent. Delicious. Rock.

Later steeps lighten the tone considerably and the deep sweetness transforms into delicate florals and pit fruit. The underlying latticework of the Yan Cha is further exposed to be refined and minimalist.

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81

Very nice fruit-like flavors, with a slight roastedness at the end.
I was expecting/hoping for a more houjicha-like roasted flavor, but perhaps that would have killed all the nice fruit flavors.
It can supposedly go 7 infusions, perhaps if one uses all 7g from the pack (I just had this 1 sample), but I split it so I could try it twice, using perhaps ~3g the first time and ~4g the second. It seems like after 5 infusions, it didn’t have enough flavor to continue (though I did go to 7).

I’m not sure whether I liked this or the modern green more, but it was very enjoyable.
Going to have to keep trying different Oolongs to see if I find one that I love as much as Japanese greens. So far the closest contender has been pricey – Phoenix Yellow Stone Oolong.

The biggest surprise is that out of 3 samples, I was really excited to try this TGY (charcoal) and the TGY (modern green), while the real sample originally offered was Yunnan Golden Bud…. However, in the end, the Yunnan Golden Bud was my favorite!!

A big thanks to Gingko for the free samples! (Btw, I realized that you DIDN’T duplicate the samples…. I originally thought the Charcoal Roast was going to be packaged in the Red bag, and the Modern Green II in the Green bag, but it was in fact opposite).

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87

slightly vegetal yet sweet and almost nutty. I like this very much!!! Smooth.

Peggie Bennett

How can you not with a name like “Dong Ding Oolong”? :-)

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96

Truly a WONDER Tea. It’s been a while since I tried this and once I tasted it – all the positive memories came back! Awesome!

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