Mountain Tea

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Recent Tasting Notes

85

I think this is what I’m drinking. The package only says "Aged Oolong 95C mountaintea.com). So, I’m taking a guess. The little pebbles are a dark brown and slight oily skin. They are heavily compressed and give off a dry wood and roast scent. I placed a generous amount in my warmed gaiwan and gave em a shake. The smell is quite potent and heavily fruited. There is an underlying smoke aroma and prominent raisin tone. I washed the pebbles once and prepare for brewing. The flavor is unlike the aroma. The liquor is pale bronze and very sweet. The taste is very fruity and juicy, yet there is an underlying roast that lingers on the tongue. This brew has a “fruit by the foot” flavor hahah. It reminds me of my childhood snacks. This was very good, and a decent quality aged oolong. I’m glad that I didn’t judge a book by its cover on this, for the packaging was not that attractive.

Also, there is a lingering sweetness that does last for what seems like forever. I feel like I just had a bunch of pastries with berries in them :)

Flavors: Berry, Fruity, Honey, Smoke, Sweet

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 30 sec 6 g 3 OZ / 100 ML
boychik

I want to try it for some time . Did you get it from Whatcha or MT?

Haveteawilltravel

this is from MT. Do you brew gongfu or western. I have enough for a western session.

boychik

Gongfu. Do you have 3g? i have my teeny 50ml gaiwan lol

Haveteawilltravel

Yes I do, msg me address, and I’ll have it sent out with some goodies :)

Haveteawilltravel

This fruit aftertaste lasts literally over an hour after drinking xD

boychik

thanks, i will :)

curlygc

Aaaaaand another tea goes on my wishlist!

Haveteawilltravel

I’m only here to help xD

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86

There’s an entire page for this, but apparently, it’s misplaced. Oh well, here’s my review of it.

I like this one a lot, and makes me feel relieved in terms of budget. I was actually recommended this one as a bagged, and based on the descriptions of caramel, I had to try it.

First time, I tried to do it Gongfu, but wound up Western on accident. I definitely got something like a spicier yet lighter black tea, but the more subtle notes like caramel were overwhelmed after two minutes. There were even seaweed notes that were kinda good, but something I have to be in the mood for. It got sweeter in the later steeps with something that reminded me of a cooked cherry, but not entirely.

Finally got to do it Gongfu tonight, with a ten second rinse at 195 degrees, using six grams in six ounces. The first rinse had a taste that replicates rose water. This tea is VERY close to a Laoshan black because it has the same type of rosy, cooked fruit character. Laoshan’s are one of my favorites, and in comparison, this one is a lighter brother or cousin that does not have the robust malt or chocolate of a black. It also doesn’t have the same dehydrating effect that a black does.

Steep two, 30 seconds, and still very rosy with a faded molasses bitter sweetness. Steep three, a full minute, and darker, redder, and something closer to a black tea. Four at two minutes, and something like a cherry black, but lighter. Five at three, and cooked cherry.

I really liked this one, but it is a toss up. When I’m in the mood for it, I would probably rate this one a 90; when I’m not, an 80. I still need to figure out better steeping parameters for this one. It was sweet, but not as sweet as I was expecting. I didn’t get the full caramel or honey like described, so I’ll be back on this one pretty soon.

Flavors: Cherry, Honey, Molasses, Roasted, Rose, Salt, Seaweed, Smooth, Vegetal

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 30 sec 1 tsp 6 OZ / 177 ML

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94
drank Lishan, Winter by Mountain Tea
18 tasting notes

I’ve seen Mountain Tea’s LiShan name-dropped a few times on Steepster and r/tea due to its abnormally cheap price. With 5 ounces going for only $25, could it actually be any good? Well, judging by the reviews on Steepster and r/tea, people seem to be quite impressed.

Mountain Tea recently started selling a Spring LiShan that created a bit of a buzz on r/tea, which reminded me that I had a box of the Winter LiShan still sitting on my tea shelf. I figured it was about time that I got around to writing about it.

LiShan is probably my favorite type of oolong tea, so I couldn’t wait to try Mountain Tea’s version. LiShan is a mountain in central Taiwan. Its name translates to “Pear Mountain,” which conjures up lovely images of pear orchards and tea fields. And from what I read online, that image is quite accurate. LiShan is home to many pear and apple orchards, which require the cool mountain temperatures in order to thrive.

This is the last Mountain Tea I have to review, so there won’t be any more in the future….sorry if I’ve been reviewing too many of their products lately! For the next few weeks, I’ll be focusing on White2Tea’s newer offerings.

I drank this tea while constructing a tea table, so pardon any messiness or sawdust.

Dry Leaf

The dry leaf looks like a standard rolled oolong. Most of the leaves were a dark grey-green color, but there are also a few bright green leaves floating around. There are a few stems thrown into the mix.

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These leaves certainly smell like high quality LiShan. They give off a very grassy and floral aroma, but with a certain richness to it that is very hard to put into words. The closest thing I can think of is perhaps a roasted nut or coconut aroma.

Teaware

I got to break in my beautiful new teapot for this review. I just got this Ruyao Triad Teapot from White2Tea.

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I’ve had my eye on this teapot for several months since I’m such a huge sucker for ruyao teapots and it matches my ruyao teacup perfectly. After gushing about this teapot to all of my tea friends, I finally received it as a gift. There is a lesson to learn here. If you drop subtle hints about a teapot long enough, somebody will buy it for you (sarcasm).

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I used 9 grams of leaf for this 150 ml teapot.

Brewing

I started out brewing this tea at 190° F. The first steep is a light buttery yellow color with a touch of green.

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The upfront taste is light and extremely floral, somewhat similar to a Jin Xuan milk oolong. However, the herbal notes take over quite quickly and begin to dominate. The mouthfeel is very thick and pleasant, which is a feature that I really enjoy in high mountain oolongs.

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The aftertaste is very sweet and floral, and left my mouth feeling clean and refreshed.

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The second steep is a bit lighter in color. The mouthfeel is still very thick, but the flavor profile changes. The herbal flavor fades away and is replaced by a sweet and fruity flavor, perhaps pineapple as other reviewers have mentioned.

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I think I left the third steep to sit a bit too long, so it came out noticeably darker. This tea is still very pleasant when oversteeped.

I continued to drink this tea for about 7 or 8 infusions, so it can certainly last through a longer tea tasting session. After finishing this session, I felt extremely relaxed and calmed, perhaps even more so than I usually do after sitting down to drink tea. That’s a good sign I suppose!

Finished Leaf

The finished leaves were very large and full. It looks like there are more stems than I noticed before, so perhaps they were curled into the balls.

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Conclusion

This LiShan may not be quite as good as the super duper top-notch stuff you can find in high-end Taiwanese tea stores, but it is still a wonderful tea. I would definitely recommend grabbing a bag of this from Mountain Tea. As far as the quality to price ratio goes, you can’t do much better than this LiShan.

I am elated to have found this tea, because I can now drink quality LiShan on a regular basis without breaking the bank. This tea is cheap enough that I can drink it regularly without feeling guilty about the ridiculous amount of money I spend on tea every year. With 5 ounces of this tea only going for $25, I wouldn’t pass it up. I will definitely be buying this tea again, and I can’t wait to try the Spring LiShan to see how it compares.

For the next few weeks, I’ll be focusing on White2Tea’s newer offerings. It’s been a while since I’ve tried any new and interesting puerh teas, so I am looking forward to it!

http://mountaintea.com/collections/green-oolong/products/lishan-winter-1

Some people will tell you there is a great deal of poetry and fine sentiment in a chest of tea.~Ralph Waldo Emerson

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 0 min, 45 sec 9 g 150 OZ / 4436 ML

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94

2003 Aged Green Heart Oolong from Mountain Tea and What-Cha

The 2003 Aged Green Heart Oolong came to my attention after some of my reddit buddies on r/tea messaged me about six months ago and raved about how delicious and nuanced this tea is. I kept this information in the back of my mind, where it lay dormant for several months. Then I saw the results of the 2014 North American Tea Championship and saw that this tea won 2nd Place in the Aged/Baked Oolong category. I’m not entirely sure how reliable these results are, but I figured that this tea was probably worth a shot regardless. I’m a huge fan of aged oolongs, especially ones with bolder flavors and a nice mouthfeel.

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This oolong is from Wushe in Nantou, Taiwan. It has been stored in Taiwan since 2003 and has been roasted every two or three years to remove any accumulated moisture. The elevation of the Wushe tea garden is 1500 meters, or about 5000 feet. I suppose that this tea would qualify as a “high mountain” oolong, although it was not advertised as such. The site described this as 30% oxidized, so this tea belongs on the greener end of the oolong spectrum.

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The What-Cha website also mentions that this tea comes from the Qing Xin varietal of the Camellia sinensis tea plant. Qing Xin is one of the most common varietals of Taiwanese tea. Although the varietal is nothing too out of the ordinary, I appreciate that the website gives out this information.

Dry Leaf

The leaves looked typical of a rolled style Taiwanese oolong. The color was very interesting, a sort of dark green-brown thanks to the aging and roasting process. The dry leaves are very full and unbroken, which is a good sign. The stems are still on many of the leaf segments, which is a bit unusual.

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These leaves simply smell incredible. This is definitely one of the best smelling teas I have come across in a very long time. The primary aroma is of roasted nuts and freshly baked bread, very “roasty” and almost yeasty. The background aroma is very herb-like and malty. The Mountain Tea website also picked up on the herbal aroma, describing it as an “enticing herbal fragrance, including thyme and dried basil, finishing with a hint of something malty.” There is a certain brightness to the aroma that I can’t quite describe, but it certainly made me want to continue smelling this tea for a very long time.

I placed the leaves into a warmed gaiwan and was amazed by the amplified smell. All of the previous aromas were still there, but a very pleasant fruity, grape-like smell developed. This tea has every smell that you could possibly want in an aged oolong…simply incredible!

Teaware

I used 6 grams of leaf for my gaiwan that is just a bit over 100 mL. It looks a lot larger than it is because the walls are very thick. I put 3.5 grams of leaf into my 70 mL Yixing pot.

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I decided to brew this tea two ways. I really wanted to break out my adorable Yixing pot that I use for greener aged oolongs. I bought this guy from a tea master in Taiwan. I don’t get around to using it much, but it brings back great memories every time I see it on my tea shelf. I also used a gaiwan in order to give a fair taste test, since Yixing pots can affect the flavor of certain teas.

Brewed Tea

I started out brewing this tea with a few shorter 15 second or so steeps, and then moved up to a few minutes per steep by the end of the session. I played around with the water temperature a bit. The Mountain Tea Site said to use 95 °C/203° F water, while the What-Cha site suggested 85° C/185° F. I leaned towards the side of Mountain Tea on this one, since this tea is from their company. I didn’t find a huge difference either way, although I slightly preferred the hotter water. I used 93° C/200° F water for this taste test, so your own experience with this tea may be slightly different if you use a different water temperature.

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I gave the tea a quick rinse and then started with the brewing. The first steep came out a beautiful golden color with a slight orange-red tint. After this first steep, I looked at the leaves in the gaiwan and noticed that they were barely even open yet. Perhaps aging tea makes the leaves more resistant to opening?

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The first and second steeps were very fruity and malty. The fruity character is more like a dried fruit taste. I would describe the taste most accurately as nutty and raisin-like, with a background taste of charcoal. The little hint of smoke or charcoal on the back of the palate really adds a lot to the character of this tea.

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The mouthfeel of this tea is very smooth and thick, almost buttery. I could feel the sides of my mouth being coated with the strong flavors of this tea.

This tea really excels in the aftertaste category. The aftertaste is extremely long lasting, and very smooth and malty. There is also a very noticeable lingering sweetness present. I could still taste this tea in my mouth 30 minutes after finishing a cup.

The third and fourth steeps were much sweeter tasting, which was a nice surprise. The “juicy” thirst-quenching attributes of this tea came out in these steeps as well. The flavor is much brighter and an interesting sharp and tangy note developed. I would describe this as lemon or citrus fruit perhaps. The herbal notes in this tea were quite noticeable in these steeps as well. The thyme and basil sort of flavors really play quite nicely with the dried fruit taste.

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The later steeps were very different. The dried fruit notes almost disappeared, and the charcoal and smoke flavors became much more apparent. At this stage, the tea tastes almost like the later steeps of a heavily baked oolong such as a Muzha Tieguanyin. I finished this session after about nine or ten steeps, so this tea can certainly handle quite a few infusions.

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After this tea session, I went for a run in the beautiful Maine spring (hooray, over 60° F for once). During my run, I kept on noticing the smoky raisin taste still in my mouth. This aftertaste just keeps on going and going…

Finished Leaf

The finished leaves were a bit darker than I expected. They were very curly and twisted still, even after all nine or ten steeps. They never really opened up fully into large flat leaves like oolongs normally do, but I suppose that is probably because the tea has been aged for quite a while. The stems on these leaves are very long and coiled as well.

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Conclusion

This is one of the very best aged oolongs I have had, especially for the price. This tea is not even very expensive. On Mountain Tea, you can buy 2 ounces for $16, which is a little pricy. But if you are willing to buy in bulk (and you will want to), it’s not too bad. Mountain Tea also sells 5 ounces for $35 and 10.5 ounces for $60.

On What-Cha, 50 grams/1.76 ounces in $10.50, 100 grams/3.5 ounces is $19.53, and 250 grams/8.8 ounces is $45.68.

I give a lot of favorable reviews on this blog, but I don’t often repurchase the same teas again and again. However, I just placed an order for 250 grams/8.8 ounces of this tea, so obviously I enjoyed it! In order for me to buy that much of any tea, I have to really be in love with it. I can’t stop thinking about how I just bought this tea at barely over $5 per ounce. I feel like I’m stealing. If I could pay more money to Mountain Tea/What-Cha for this tea, I would…and that’s coming from me, one of the cheapest people you will ever come across.

Go out and buy this tea now, before the rest of the online tea community finds out and buys it all! It also might be fun to buy some of this tea and play around with aging it for longer.

~”There is a great deal of poetry and fine sentiment in a chest of tea” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

http://what-cha.com/oolong-tea/taiwan-2003-aged-green-heart-oolong-tea/

http://mountaintea.com/collections/competition-grade/products/aged-green-heart-oolong-2003

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 30 sec 6 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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74

This was on sale at Mountain Tea, so I decided to try it as a way of trying out both the company and a greener oolong. The first thing i tasted, while the tea was very hot, was light clover honey. Now as it cools, I’m getting some of that vegetal, green tea flavor that I don’t like so much , and also floral, I think. I can tell it’s a good one — there are no bad or off flavors. It tastes very fresh.

I did a rinse infusion for 15 seconds, then steeped 30 , then 45… Now on the third infusion (including the rinse), it’s more vegetal and buttery and less naturally sweet to me. This is really never going to be my favorite type of tea, but there’s nothing bad about it, really. It’s not bitter the way I find so much green tea, and it doesn’t seem to make me nauseous in the same way.

Next time, I’ll try it starting out with shorter infusions… Maybe I’ll add some sugar or actual honey. It’s good, but I will not buy it again unless my tastes change considerably over the course of this 5 ounce package. You’ll like this if this is your thing, but it’s not really mine.

Flavors: Butter, Floral, Honey, Vegetal

Preparation
5 g 6 OZ / 177 ML

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drank Black Pearl by Mountain Tea
262 tasting notes

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85
drank GABA Oolong by Mountain Tea
18 tasting notes

For today’s review, I decided to review a rather interesting tea. This tea is a GABA processed oolong from Taiwan. The GABA processing for teas was discovered in Japan in the late 1980’s. You can find GABA black and green teas, but most are oolong teas. I’m not sure why that is, especially since green tea is so much more popular in Japan. Perhaps somebody out there has the answer to this dilemma, and can tell us in the comments!

If you’ve ever taken an Intro to Psychology or Neuroscience course in college, you are probably familiar with GABA. Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid is one of the main neurotransmitters for the Central Nervous System (CNS). Its most important role is to reduce neuron excitability. Thus, GABA supplements are most commonly associated with their calming effect on the nervous system. These teas are usually advertised for their ability to improve relaxation and sleep quality, lower blood pressure, and lowering cholesterol levels. Some students in Japan will use GABA teas to improve their performance on exams. While searching through vast online articles about obscure teas, I even found some articles suggesting that GABA teas can help fight off schizophrenia. As with most excessive health claims, these are probably only true to a certain extent…or not true at all, in my opinion! But if you enjoy this tea anyways, I suppose that is a pleasant potential side effect.

Although this seems like a bit of a silly marketing scam (because it probably is…) many tea bloggers and tea aficionados in the world really enjoy GABA teas due to their unique taste.

The GABA process for tea is quite simple. You just have to expose the tea leaves to extremely elevated levels of nitrogen during processing. During the oxidation phase of processing, all of the oxygen is replaced with nitrogen. This causes the glutamic acid in the tea leaves to be converted to GABA. In order to be considered a true GABA tea, the leaves must contain at least 150 mg of GABA per 100 g of leaf. Most of the GABA teas I found online claim to have between 200 and 300 mg per 100 g of leaf.

GABA teas are quite popular in Japan, but are just making their way to the States, so I feel pretty lucky to get the chance to try such a unique beverage. Thanks, Japan! You never fail to disappoint me with your quirky inventions.

Anyways, on to the exciting part!

Dry Leaf

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The dry leaf of this tea looks pretty similar to your standard rolled style oolong. The leaves look pretty high quality, are there is no dust or broken leaves. The aroma of this tea is so unique. I have never smelled a tea like this. Like other tea bloggers I’ve read, I really have no words to describe what this smells like. While some people on Steepster and other tea enthusiast sites do not like the smell, I actually really enjoy it. It seems kind of bread-like. It’s very yeasty and roasted smelling, kind of similar to a roasted oolong but with a bit of a….sharpness to it. Very intriguing!

Oh, you want to see a more up-close shot of the action? Sure!

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Brewed Tea

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I brewed five grams of the leaves in my tea tasting set. Brewing this tea was an experience in itself. I gave the leaves a quick five second rinse. When I poured the boiling water over the leaves in the first steep, a ton of bubbles came rushing to the surface. This effect lasted several seconds. Presumably this has something to do with the GABA process. Neat!

My first impression of the taste is…wow, this is really weird! The taste is very roasted, like a typical roasted oolong. But the yeasty bread like smell comes through in the taste as well. It’s very odd, but pretty pleasant in my opinion. This tea is also quite fruity. It has a dried fruit/raisin sort of taste, similar to the Medium Roast TieGuanYin from Mountain Tea that I reviewed last week. There is a very notable sour taste to this tea, which many other reviewers have noted. I don’t find this unpleasant, but I don’t think I would necessarily want to drink this regularly. The first and second steep had a strong woody taste to it, but this faded away in the third and fourth steeps. The later steeps became more floral and light. These later steeps were very pleasant, so I would say that this tea holds up very well to multiple infusions.

Finished Leaf

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The leaves unfurled very nicely. Most of the leaves were attached in groups of threes or fours. This looks very high quality! None of the leaves were torn or bruised. There were a lot more stems than oolongs usually have.

Conclusion

This tea is very interesting and strange, but I really enjoyed it. This is definitely a tea worth trying. At $11 for 2 ounces or $23 for 5 ounces, it’s not too expensive either. I would be interested in trying some more GABA oolongs in the future so that I could compare them. I’ll definitely be enjoying the rest of this bag.

Flavors: Fruity, Raisins, Sour

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 45 sec 5 g 5 OZ / 147 ML

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82

For my debut into the online tea snob world, I chose the Medium Roast TieGuanYin from Mountain Tea. Mountain Tea specializes in Taiwanese oolong teas, but they sell a few green and puerh teas from other countries as well. This particular tea is very popular in the online tea community, and won 1st Place in the Traditional TieGuanYin Category of the 2012 North American Tea Championship.

In case you aren’t as obsessed with tea as I am, I can describe the tea a bit. TieGuanYin, also called 铁观音 or 鐵觀音, is a variety of oolong tea from Anxi in Fujian Province, China. The name translates roughly to “Iron Goddess of Mercy,” but you will sometimes see it sold as “Iron Buddha” as well.

Dry Leaf

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The dry leaf has the appearance of a typical rolled style oolong. The leaves seem to be high quality. The leaves have a very notable roasted aroma, which is quite pleasant. They smell very sweet and caramelized. But overall, the smell is not too intense.

Teaware

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I brewed five grams of the leaves in my new tea tasting set. I bought this set at the Beipu Farmers’ Market in Beipu Township, which is in Hsinchu County in northern Taiwan. I’m pretty happy with it, although I had to carry it in my backpack for a week. I’m pretty surprised that this tasting set managed to make it home undamaged.

Brewed Tea

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This tea is very interesting and complex. The first taste that hits my palate is the notable roasted taste. I suppose since the tea is called “medium roast,” I expected the roasted taste to be a bit more subtle. But it is certainly very enjoyable either way. With that said, this tea does still have a slight bit of the bite that is typical of greener oolongs.

As a result of this roasting process, the tea’s head note has a very caramelized flavor, with a noticeable honey sweetness. The tea is very nutty tasting, as roasted oolongs tend to be. Surprisingly, I also picked up on a toasted bread-like taste in this body notes of this tea, which many other reviewers online have noted. The aftertaste is very fruity, similar to the lingering apricot or peach notes that are common to some oolongs. However, this fruity flavor is a bit more like a dried fruit taste, perhaps a raisin note?

As I progressed through some repeated steepings, I was a bit disappointed that this tea did not keep its flavor so well. The roasted flavor of this tea became rather flat by the third and fourth steep. However, the fruitiness is more pronounced in the later steeps.

Finished Leaf

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The tightly rolled leaves unfurled nicely. A few of the leaves are a bit choppy and bruised looking, which is generally not a great sign in rolled oolongs. However, this tea still appears to be high quality.

Conclusion

All in all, this tea is quite solid. If you tend to enjoy more roasted tasting oolongs, you will probably enjoy this. I wouldn’t say that this is the absolute best TieGuanYin oolong I’ve had, but it is certainly one of the best TieGuanYin oolongs I have had for the price. At only $9 for 2 ounces, or $18 for 5 ounces, this tea is pretty affordable. I probably wouldn’t go out of my way to buy this tea again, but I will certainly enjoy the rest of the bag and I would recommend it to others.

Flavors: Fruity, Nuts, Peach, Plums, Raisins, Roasted

Preparation
Boiling 1 min, 0 sec 5 g 5 OZ / 147 ML

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82

No notes yet. Add one?

Flavors: Fruity, Nuts, Peach, Plums, Raisins

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81
drank DaYuLing by Mountain Tea
7 tasting notes

A good tea with a lingering sweet aftertaste. I let the boiling water to cool down a bit so the tea doesn’t get too bitter. It is too expensive to drink it everyday though.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 7 tsp 4 OZ / 118 ML

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81
drank DaYuLing by Mountain Tea
7 tasting notes

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85

This is my first tea from Mountain Tea and I can say that it won’t be my last! I found out about them from the amount of time they’ve won the NATC! This tea is great very floral smell to it like most Oolong’s but the taste of this tea is very sweet. Almost a black tea malt to it, but more of a light fruity taste that is sweet because of the leafhopper bitten leaves. Once swallowed the fruity taste stays on the tongue, making me appreciate the flavor even more.

Preparation
2 tsp 6 OZ / 177 ML

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84

To think this tea is available on clearance is just crazy. Ridiculous price.

Taste: Sweet cream, slight tang of a really good fatty butter. Some floral in the flavor. Just delicious as an everyday go to Oolong. Highly recommend for anyone wanting to try Oolong. Like most Oolongs, leaves are forgiving too. You can steep hot (200) or warm (185). I find hotter worked better on this tea especially as infusions went on.

Smell: Initial infusions are very floral. My nose isn’t that great yet, but I’d say gardenia/orchid like. Later infusions turn more to heavy cream scent.

Flavors: Butter, Cream, Floral, Sweet

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 45 sec 4 g 100 OZ / 2957 ML

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92

Another great tea from Mountain Tea.

The leaves are just gorgeous. I was totally expecting nutty goodness, but I don’t recall having a roasted TieGuanYin with such a floral perfume background as well. I would be happy just smelling the leaves from each infusion.

The liquor comes out a solid yellow, tinge of green. Great flavors, very complex, changing with each infusion. I got a solid 10 steeps in gaiwan and even though contemplated doing another couple.

Sweet, nutty, floral, little bitty tartness, just delicious. Very high quality.

Flavors: Caramel, Floral, Nutty, Toasty

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 0 min, 45 sec 4 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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94

Trying this Western style for the first time. It’s just not the same!!!

yyz

I know western style doesn’t do it for me for most Oolong’s.

madametj

it wasn’t very good. I dumped it out :(

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94

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94

Just a quick little gongfu session. Light, but delicious! :)

Flavors: Flowers

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 0 min, 30 sec 2 g 4 OZ / 118 ML
Terri HarpLady

Hi! I just checked out your blog, & you are totally adorable, your blog looks like, fun, & I’m looking forward to reading the ‘building a better closet’ entries especially! Welcome to steepster!

Terri HarpLady

Or, if you’ve already been here awhile, Nice to meet ya!
:)

madametj

Thank you :)

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94

So 7 grams today was definitely much better. Here’s what I did: rinse,25s,25s,30s,60s,70s.

Still experimenting with steeping times. The tea had a nice light flavor with perfumey floral notes as usual. When I jumped to 6o seconds, it got a little bitter so I’ll have to try something different next time. What I REALLY need is a thermometer so I can stop playing the guessing game over here and make this tea properly!

Flavors: Flowers, Perfume

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 30 sec 7 g 4 OZ / 120 ML
sherapop

Having a thermometer is so helpful, and it costs less and is more dependable than a variable temperature kettle! I also love having a small scale, which takes the guess work out of amounts…

madametj

Yes, my little scale has been so handy! Glady I already had that on hand from my knitting hobby :)

sherapop

How interesting, madametj: you weigh yarn?

madametj

I used to be in a group where we were all making blankets like this one: http://lh3.ggpht.com/-BsflSWvrhEk/UCGokQsUXQI/AAAAAAAAB4A/y1WGWPap5zQ/003_thumb%25255B1%25255D.jpg?imgmax=800

and we all wanted as many colors as humanly possible so we would have swaps where each person would buy one 100g ball of yarn, divide it into 20 5g balls and send them off so that we would each end up with 20 different colored 5g balls, hence the scale. So much fun. I’m still using all that yarn. lol

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94

This is only my third time tasting a full-leaf oolong tea. My palate is not very refined so I didn’t notice much of a difference between this and the one that I tried in the Steepster Select Dec 13 box (Nantou Four Seasons by In Pursuit of Tea) but that’s great because I LOVED that one. So anyway that’s why I made sure to get one from Nantou, Taiwan.

This is how I drank my tea:
Water : 120ml – 194℉-ish
Use 9.3 Grams Tea
7 steeps : rinse,39s,25s,30s, 30s, 40s,60s,90s,120s
Yixing pot
Rinsing time is around 5 seconds

9 grams was way too much. By the second steep they expanded so much that I could barely close the lid on the teapot! It didn’t help that I oversteeped the first steep because I was doing something else while counting (big mistake) and went 14 seconds over. It was so bitter that I had to throw out that cup. The second rinse was still bitter, but I drank it anyway., and the following steepings where not quite as bitter. The tea was nice and perfumey, very floral. Only just a little bit overwpowering because I had used too many leaves. The flavor stayed strong with each steeping and seemed like it could go on forever, but by the 7th steep I’d had enough. Next time less leaves and no distractions.

Flavors: Flowers, Orchids, Perfume

Preparation
9 g 4 OZ / 120 ML
yyz

Glad you enjoy it. Steeping times are an inexact science. I have a tgy that you steep only 10-20 seconds and a jin xuan that you start at 45, but it looks like what you did is a good place to start. I usually aim for a little under a 1/4 volume of my gaiwan which for my 150- 170 ml ones is around 1.5-2 TSP. Have fun playing with the tea.

madametj

Thanks!

Cheri

It’s always amazing to me how much full leaf oolongs can expand. It’s so much fun!

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79
drank DaYuLing by Mountain Tea
127 tasting notes

I remember my last mountain tea order being a lot better Im a little concerned they do not display harvest dates so for all I know the quality drop is a by product of stale tea but I have also tasted a lot of tea since my last order so maybe my tastes have just improved. Either way was not impressed with my first trial with this tea. I felt the tea drunk from the gao shan (fish eye lens, tranquility, big dumb smile) but flavor wise it seemed flat. Will wait to throw a # rating out there until I get dipper into the bag but at the moment a little disappointed considering the money I dropped on my last order.

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 30 sec 7 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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68
drank Pu-Erh, 1980 by Mountain Tea
127 tasting notes

Tried western brewing to maybe get a body or richness out of it but nope still nothing such a shame

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68
drank Pu-Erh, 1980 by Mountain Tea
127 tasting notes

I will try to tinker with steeping but at the moment not worth half the price I paid, some of my hei cha staples are similar in taste/smoothness if not better and a lot less money. That seems to be the tune of my entire last order from mountain tea, I think they have either dropped in quality since winning those awards a few years ago or maybe I have just found much better options since my last order a few years ago either way I will not be reordering from them at the moment. Eco Cha is my new favorite company at the moment :)

Flavors: Earth, Mineral

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 30 sec 6 g 3 OZ / 100 ML
JC

I hate when that happens. Hopefully, you’ll find a better suiting steeping time to make it more drinkable.

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