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Simpson's Tea

Recent Tasting Notes

66

We start off the Liquorice Herbal Blend with the same reaction as the previous herbal teas. Simpson’s dry bags are shy things; seems that even if a blend bears a specific ingredient in its name, there’s no guarantee it’ll make itself known in the aroma or even in the tea itself. So here it’s another round of rustic cooking-type herbs at your olfactory–a great chicken soup seasoning. (Licorice? What licorice?)

But then you taste it, and holy moly so that’s where the flavor went! That silly licorice was hiding amid the leaves of your kitchen garden, waiting to spring out and catch you in a tight squeeze. Each progressive sip takes the flavor deeper and deeper… Full review: http://snooteablog.com/2013/08/13/snooty-tea-review-simpsons-tea/

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44

There is no chamomile, however, in the Rose Herbal Blend. This is a good thing, since the rose scent is so faint that it’s already drowned out by the other herbs in the dry bag, resulting in a first impression of Grandma’s perfume, which might put off those who were expec-tea-ng a sweeter blend. As it steeps, this morphs into an aroma that is at once floral and savory, like someone left out a basket of tomatoes next to their wedding bouquet.

The feeling continues in the drink itself. If you’re at all familiar with the flavor of rosehips–especially popular in Eastern European tea–then this will be a pleasure to sip. Otherwise, you’re going to be left in the middle of Flavor Nowhereland without a map. This is another one that fares better being left alone to do its thing, so let it steep for as long as you have the patience. The more substantial herbs prevent the rose from bringing in the whole flower brigade; other than that, this tea lacks any defining characteris-tea-c until it’s gone nearly cold and all you’re left with is the tart, tired hibiscus. If you had this in a café and later someone asked what you had drunk… Full review: http://snooteablog.com/2013/08/13/snooty-tea-review-simpsons-tea/

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44

Our Rooibus Herbal Blend also has a touch of honey in the dry bag. Rooibus doesn’t have a robust smell in general, so you’ll be hard pressed to discern the particulari-teas of this aroma. There seems to be bits of ginger, mint, and lemongrass mixed in here, but whether it’s in or out of the cup, the scent is so faint and… Well, blended–though it remains to be seen if the tea is actually well-blended. (Another engineering note: rooibus does not do well in this type of bag. Before we were in range of the kettle, twigs were poking out and trying to escape.)

The first sip gives us a savory garden tea. Take it on a brisk walk in nature or something, where your surroundings will be more exciting. The mulch-y rooibus carries it all here, but in truth… Full review: snooteablog.com/2013/08/13/snooty-tea-review-simpsons-tea/

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74

If you were browsing the Simpson’s collection blindfolded, this is another one that would throw you for a loop. Their Mint Herbal Blend is so blended that you don’t get a wisp of mint! It’s just honeyed chamomile all the way. Before you steep it, you wonder why they don’t just call it, “Soothing Herbal Blend” or some more fitting moniker–but after that hot water hits, the mint bursts out in full force and you can rest assured that no one mislabeled your tea.

And with a blend like this, rest is definitely happening. Chamomile and mint make for sleepytime, so don’t take this as your morning tea. There is a lot of chamomile in here. From the first sip…

Full review: snooteablog.com/2013/08/13/snooty-tea-review-simpsons-tea/

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74

Earl Grey pretends it’s exactly the same as English Breakfast when it’s a dry tea. No bergamot fragrance at all, nothing that would hint at the flavor profile expected from one of these classically British blends. Just a lot of Ceylon at your nosehairs. (What a contrast to our swishy Lord Bergamot from the other week!) The aroma remains quiet as you let it steep; you can only catch wind of the citrus if you lower your nose in and breathe deeeeeeeeep. Having been packed in plastic with the other samples, it’s possible that much of the scent and strength of the tea had already left before making it to the review–but come on. It’s only been a couple of weeks.

You’d never know this was Earl Grey unless… Full review: snooteablog.com/2013/08/13/snooty-tea-review-simpsons-tea/

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74

In the bag, English Breakfast is a pretty quiet damsel. Just a bit of smoke–you can hardly call it smoke, even, more like the embers left burning after the fire has gone out. Once steeped, that lovely English Breakfast maltiness pokes out, going, “Hello, how are you doing this fine morning?” Nothing sweet here, just the rousing wakeup call to get started on the day. (On an engineering note, Simpson’s may want to look into bigger bags or fewer leaves. By the time this one was done steeping, the tea was trying to burst out of its compartment and had no room left to breathe.)

Like all those derived from South Asian blacks, English Breakfast is not a tea that you want to oversteep. Otherwise… Full review: snooteablog.com/2013/08/13/snooty-tea-review-simpsons-tea/

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