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Tea Habitat

Recent Tasting Notes

82

Just got started with this one, a little late in the day, so it’s going to have to wait overnight for a full tasting. The first couple of infusions, leaf enough to fill my little yixing Dan Cong pot about 60% full at this point, and water about 195 degrees, were quite brief—pour in, pour out. They show layers of sweet floral flavor, peach and lychee, quite delicate and lovely, and promising for more tomorrow.

Several more infusions, still mostly quite brief—had to dilute on accidental minute-long infusion several fold to get back to the concentration that makes me happy, and it did make me quite happy. Sweet, fruity, floral, but not the degree of spiciness that I associate with my favorites of the Dan Congs. More when I’ve reached the bottom of this tea….

Edit again: I never finished the post, but I did finish the tea—the leaves stopped making interesting infusion somewhere between the 20th and 25th infusions.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 15 sec

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93

First time I’ve tried this tea: it’s a lovely tea, delicate and richly floral. I didn’t weigh the tea first, not really trying for a formal review, or take notes infusion by infusion, but it’s already apparent, about six infusions in, that this is a very friendly and forgiving sort. If it were less pricey, I’d call it a good beginner’s Dan Cong.

Editing to add some morning after impressions—still infusing the same leaves, left in the teapot overnight: spicy notes coming to the fore this morning: cinnamon & cloves along with the floral. Very nice.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec

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88

Sweet and caramelicious, as described. Very very smooth and delicious. I’m brewing a little more than a gram of tea in a tiny yixing pot, water about 185 degrees for a start, amazing lovely stuff. This would make an excellent ‘starter’ Dan Cong—hard to imagine it going wrong in any unpleasant way. 3 infusions in, still very lovely. Sweet, caramel, fruity—stewed fruit rather than fresh, perhaps—and just a hint of spice.

Back many infusions later—infusions 30 seconds or more now, water 205 degrees, and still delicious—the spiciness is to the fore more now, and still sweet and rich, but a little thinner. Quite a lovely tea.

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 0 min, 15 sec
TeaBrat

Thief Poop!

Grace

Thief poop, lol

xhado123

I’ve wanted to try that one for a while, been afraid of the cost vs. volume.

teaddict

None of the TeaHabitat ‘single bush’ Dan Congs are cheap, but I’ve always enjoyed them. I brew them up in a very small pot or gaiwan, and get a lot of infusions out of them, so the price per unit of enjoyment is not so bad.

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97

Stunning initial sweet fruity scent when put into the preheated Chao Zhou teapot. Unfortunately I forgot to weigh the tea beforehand.

And the tea lives up to the preview aroma: superbly fragrant, sweet, fruity, delicious first infusion at 10 seconds. Very little change yet at the third very brief infusion. Gorgeous stuff.

Up to the 6th or 7th—lost track. Still keeping infusions fairly short, this one will be about 20 seconds. Have to set it aside for now, more later!

Now on to the 12th or so, after the poor leaves had to sit overnight. Some of the wonder was definitely lost in the sitting overnight, but still, this sweetwater phase is pretty sweet—nudging the rating up a bit more. LOVE this one.

If it were any more intensely aromatic and floral it would be too much—it’s right up there, close to the line that divides ‘fantastic!’ from ‘like drinking shampoo, yuck!’, waving at all the jasmines that went too far into undrinkability.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec
TeaBrat

wow – that tea has a SERIOUS name!

teaddict

it packs the aroma and flavor punch to carry it off handsomely

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35

arômes liqueur: fumé à l’attaque, miel, fruité,végétal, minéral,lacté
texture: lisse, doux
saveurs:légèrement sucré, sans amertume
longueur en bouche sur notes végétales et minérales

Préparation: 2g (échantillon complet fourni par Imen) /zhong 7cl/(100°C,15");(95°,10");(95°,15");(95°,20");(95°,30")
au bout de ces infusions les feuilles sont toujours repliées. Méthode d’infusion pas optimale, à améliorer.

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec

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91

Burying my nose in this packet of tea struck me with a strong whiff of real orchid scent. It wasn’t overpowering, but delightful and sweet. I brewed up 3g in a 90ml pot for short bursts, and the tea can’t be described with anything but “amazing.” The liquor is a warm gold, with a distinct silky feel to it that I was surprised to detect in such a clear tea. At first, the honey notes bowled me over, but with careful steeping this eventually shifts to airy florals. It is very easy to brew this one too light and get no fragrance, or too long and go too bitter, but dedication is so so rewarding. You can seriously sit all day with this tea, and not be disappointed.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 30 sec
Geoffrey

Nice to get some insight on this one. I’ve been eying Imen’s offerings since I first heard of her a couple months ago. Dancongs captivate me, and I’m on a quest for the best out there. I’d like to try one of the comprehensive samplers from Tea Habitat when I have some extra money to do so.

BTW, you have the best profile pic of anyone on here!

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87

I’m now several sessions in with this tea, and still don’t have a good formal tasting session where I’ve kept track of grams of tea and infusion times. I can say for sure that I can detect the resemblance to osmanthus, that it is floral, sweet, fruity, and tart; that it is possible to get a bitter infusion out of it, but I have to push it very hard, because it is a very forgiving tea; that it can yield many infusions, because I’m sure this batch is probably at least at 15 if not 20 infusions—I’ve refilled the kettle twice to at least the one liter mark, there is still half a liter in it, and it wasn’t entirely empty when I started this one; and that it is delicious brewed in a thin porcelain gaiwan as well as in a Chao Zhou pot from Tea Habitat. Good stuff. I will put the leaves to bed now but if I weren’t going home for the evening I’d try for another handful of long infusions.

Good stuff.

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 15 sec

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89

The package is almost empty, and still never a formal tasting session note. I enjoyed this one for 5-6 infusions in the evening, let the leaves sit overnight in the steeper, and then enjoyed another full day of infusions, floral, sweet, fruity, spicy, complex. One of my tea-buddies said, while enjoying today’s Alishan offering, “this one is nice, but that one yesterday [the Kan Tou] was something else…..so nice I want to wear it as perfume!” Another Dan Cong fan is born….

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 15 sec

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91

Tasting for the first time…

Just picked this up yesterday at Ku Cha House of Tea in Boulder, CO.

By the description, I expected a heavier tea. This is actually quite light, very smooth. I did steep for 2 minutes only – my preferred time for most teas, even black teas. It has a slightly vegetal smell. I don’t taste the chocolate of the description. I taste…a hint of red wine. It’s not at all grassy, but yes a bit malty.

I like :)

My second steep: this time 3 minutes… Still very smooth, no bitterness at all. Still getting a hint of red wine. Am I crazy – have inadequate taste buds?!?!? I don’t care. This is tasty. The color is a rich brown, though not as dark as a black tea (at least in my green/brown glazed ceramic cup).

Gotta recommend this one for anyone who enjoys an oolong :)

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 2 min, 0 sec

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80

I’ve been having trouble with this one: I bought it hoping it would be a little less intense or touchy than the full on Dan Cong versions, and that it might permit some bulk brewing for sharing with a wider group. It works decently gongfu, but not for the bulk brewing. So for the purpose I had for it, the rating should be low, but as the tea is meant to be brewed, its fine but not fantastic.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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83

I’m really enjoying this one in my tiny yixing or late evenings at work. The tea is mellow, floral, a little spicy, and I cannot begin to think how it could have inspired someone to think of duck poop as they prepared or drank it. It’s just too nice a dan cong!

Checking the now fully hydrated leaves (at infusion 8 or 10 or so), it looks like I put in enough leaf to fill the pot halfway when fully expanded. I’ve tried this one with denser packing and that risks a degree of bitterness that I do not enjoy, so I go more dilute for full enjoyment.

Edit to add: I forgot to mention fruity! the late infusions, when it is closing in on ‘sweet water’, still retain a delightful peachiness. If this is duck poop, the duck is laying golden peaches instead of eggs.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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83

Never did finish that previous note, though I did infuse the tea many more times that day.

Last night I had another session with this tea, in a tiny yixing pot, having to let the leaf soften a bit in the first infusion before I could fit the lid on without breaking the leaves. The peachiness kept going until well past the 10th infusion, fruity and floral and delicious.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 15 sec

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100

2008 Song Zhong #5
Phoenix Dan Cong Oolong from TeaHabitat,
March 2011
A first brewing of a spectacular tea. I was intending to reach for my 60mL Chao Zhou pot, having planned on a small series of infusions, but without really paying attention grabbed a larger pot instead. So there were fewer than anticipated infusions because the tea was really quite dilute. Despite that, it really shone.

Sweet, scent of dried apricots from the long, thin, twisted, quite dark brown leaves

Used 1.5g leaf in 100 mL clay pot—which as you can see is not much for the size of the pot

205 degrees, first infusion 20 seconds—still that apricot scent, floral in the first infusion, and the flavor matches—stone fruit with flowers. Oh my oh my.

2nd infusion, 45 seconds, sweet, floral, fruity, more intense with the longer infusion. A touch of spice—cinnamon, mace—on the back of the tongue, along with the floral.

3rd infusion, 45 second, more of the same—floral, fruity.

5th infusion, 1 minute—spicier coming to the fore, with the fruity/floral notes still rounding out the flavor, felt more at the sides of my mouth and in the sweet aftertaste. I open my mouth, inhale though it, and the sweet floral taste remains. I set a part of this apart in the aroma cup, and when I remembered it a couple of minutes later, it had cooled, but still, wow!, it was brilliant.

6th infusion, probably 2-3 minutes, more floral and fruity, didn’t drink it slow enough to really process the flavors in great detail.

Setting it aside for a while now, before I float away on this pool of tea inside me.

A 7th infusion again needed more patience. Will go away from the next one for a while, but pour water over the pot to try to keep it hot and brewing….

And 8th at about 6 minutes was clearly demonstrating that the leaves were spent. Sigh. They’re still an elegant mix of red edges and green middle.

Can’t wait to do this one again with the Chao Zhou pot and double the leaf.

Link to my web page version with photos

http://www.well.com/user/debunix/recipes/2008SongZhong.3.11.html

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 30 sec
the_skua

Why so little tea?

teaddict

I’ve occasionally found packing DCs to result in a difficult series of infusions, and generally start out a bit dilute for first infusions. However, this time my own caution was compounded by grabbing the much larger pot by mistake.

For my next infusions, in the 60mL Chao Zhou, I’ll probably double the leaf.

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83

First impression is mild, floral, sweet, gentle spiciness. Delicious. Will edit/add to this note as I work through the infusions, but already happy with it.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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89

I’ve had this tea several times, but oddly enough, this is all I can find that I’ve written about it:

“A delicious and mellow Dan Cong. Fruity, warm, caramel notes, but still Dan Cong with some assertiveness too.”

Will try to take notes next time!

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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80

My first (commercial) Phoenix oolong and I like its sweet taste and smooth aftertaste. Prepared in zhong, it gives me 6 infusions.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 1 min, 0 sec

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89

Another Dan Cong finishing tonight. Fruity sweet and just a little Dan Cong spice, so pleasant and mellow and lovely. This was one of Imen’s recommendations for me getting started with Dan Congs. Mmmm. But this is the last of the pouch.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 30 sec
deftea

Yes, but aren’t these DCs truly wonderful?! Imen really does have the advantage here.

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90

Sadly finished off this tea tonight, a nice set of last infusions, although the leaf seems to have given up a little earlier than I’d have expected. Sigh.

Have finished or nearly finished a few other Dan Congs from Tea Habitat—soon will be able to justify another order!

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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96

Today I had a delightful time with this tea, brewed in my gaiwan, and enjoyed for a few hours. Yup, hours. It’s remarkable how much it gives and how forgiving it can be (when I remember to not cook it in too-hot a bath).

There’s something about sipping this tea that centers and soothes. I found calm on a Monday.

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90

A near perfect gongfu session tonight—a little tea, a little gaiwan, tap water about 185 degrees, and many infusions of varying lengths demonstrating sweetness, spiciness, fruitiness, floral essences, over and over in different proportions. It’s been a while since my last Dan Cong session—too long!

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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96

Tried this last night in my new Chao Zhou teapot from Tea Habitat, and compared it to a porcelain gaiwan. I’d recently tried one of my other Dan Congs in the Chao Zhou, and that particular infusion seemed to lack a lot of the high notes from the tea, so I was a little worried about that. This is a young pot, having been used only perhaps a dozen times since first seasoning, so I suspected it of taking more than giving to the teas.

As it turned out, I could not tell any difference. Both were fruity, sweet, spicy. I will continue to use the pot and work on its seasoning without worries. But I am almost out of the Po Tou, so there will not be very many more infusions to come.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 15 sec
deftea

I think we have the same pot.

Thomas Smith

Hmm, I’ve been eying one for a while now and now I think I won’t buy it. I already have an yixing pot I’ve been using for some time with dancongs and it feel like it would be a waste of all that effort and a perfectly good pot to start over. Thanks for your comparison to the gaiwan!

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94

I haven’t had this tea since summer. There was something about the first day of October and the unseasonably warm rain that seemed to call for Dan Cong. I decided to splurge and filled by little pot (120ml Xi Shi from Tea Habitat) about two thirds full (which is a lot for my budget!). Rinsed as quickly as possible. Then shrimp eyed water. I took two deep breaths and poured. Slip into daydream: In the South where I spent childhood we ate ripe peaches with the peeling on. The peeling adds a very slight dryness without compromising the sweetness. This was the aroma coming from my cup. The aroma seemed to spread out and join the warm rain-cleaned air. I can’t remember how the tea tasted. Second and third infusions, same but three deep breaths; I don’t think I ever broke single digits in seconds, though. The aroma gets heavier: ripe peaches and apricots. The emphasis is still on the aroma, but the taste starts to assert itself. But this is interesting: for the fourth and fifth infusions, the aroma seems to shift to something more floral — ginger flower maybe, but I’ve never smelled a ginger flower that I remember. Definitely less peachy and more flower, though. And the taste is now way up front. More wood and nuts and spice. Dry, spreading horizontal to edges of tongue, brilliant feeling in my throat. I wonder if this one, this infusion, is the tea’s “true” character. I took a walk as the rain withdrew and the back-of-the-throat feel stayed with me. I will try more in the morning.

Preparation
0 min, 15 sec
Thomas Smith

I’m only familiar with California native wild ginger in terms of the flower fragrance. Definitely has a unique, lightly resinous spice note to it. I imagine making a rosewater mixing sorrel leaves and a few cloves in with the rose petals (and maybe an intact bit of cinnamon bark or cedar wood) would produce a distillation that has a similar aroma.

teaddict

Had a delightful session with a Bangwai puerh tonight, but now I want to start over with the Po Tou. I did see lots of wild ginger plants in Hawaii, but do not remember their scent. I will have to try to find it in this tea next time I brew it, maybe tomorrow. Might be time to finally do the Chao Zhou pot vs gaiwan comparison.

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