Tea Habitat

Recent Tasting Notes

83

Never did finish that previous note, though I did infuse the tea many more times that day.

Last night I had another session with this tea, in a tiny yixing pot, having to let the leaf soften a bit in the first infusion before I could fit the lid on without breaking the leaves. The peachiness kept going until well past the 10th infusion, fruity and floral and delicious.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 15 sec

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83

First impression is mild, floral, sweet, gentle spiciness. Delicious. Will edit/add to this note as I work through the infusions, but already happy with it.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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89

The package is almost empty, and still never a formal tasting session note. I enjoyed this one for 5-6 infusions in the evening, let the leaves sit overnight in the steeper, and then enjoyed another full day of infusions, floral, sweet, fruity, spicy, complex. One of my tea-buddies said, while enjoying today’s Alishan offering, “this one is nice, but that one yesterday [the Kan Tou] was something else…..so nice I want to wear it as perfume!” Another Dan Cong fan is born….

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 15 sec

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89

I’ve had this tea several times, but oddly enough, this is all I can find that I’ve written about it:

“A delicious and mellow Dan Cong. Fruity, warm, caramel notes, but still Dan Cong with some assertiveness too.”

Will try to take notes next time!

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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80

My first (commercial) Phoenix oolong and I like its sweet taste and smooth aftertaste. Prepared in zhong, it gives me 6 infusions.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 1 min, 0 sec

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90

I bought this tea mistaking it for the ‘commercial’ version of a Honey Orchid Phoenix oolong that I had been enjoying so much, and was brought up short by some harsher notes it expressed on first brewing. I looked again at the label and realized this was the single-bush Dan Cong version, and unsurprisingly it demands a bit more respect.

Tonight I am brewing it in the Chao Zhou pot I bought from Tea Habitat, and it is lovely. It’s flavors are sharper, spicier, and sweetness is more honeyed and distinct. It is like the prior tea brought into sharper focus.

So far I am on about the 9th or 10th infusion, and anticipate plenty more infusions are left in it.

I used about 2 grams of tea in the 60 mL pot, and infusions from 30 seconds at first to 1-2 minutes now, water 195 degrees, give or take 5, and the entirety of this gongfu session has been delightful.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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94

I haven’t had this tea since summer. There was something about the first day of October and the unseasonably warm rain that seemed to call for Dan Cong. I decided to splurge and filled by little pot (120ml Xi Shi from Tea Habitat) about two thirds full (which is a lot for my budget!). Rinsed as quickly as possible. Then shrimp eyed water. I took two deep breaths and poured. Slip into daydream: In the South where I spent childhood we ate ripe peaches with the peeling on. The peeling adds a very slight dryness without compromising the sweetness. This was the aroma coming from my cup. The aroma seemed to spread out and join the warm rain-cleaned air. I can’t remember how the tea tasted. Second and third infusions, same but three deep breaths; I don’t think I ever broke single digits in seconds, though. The aroma gets heavier: ripe peaches and apricots. The emphasis is still on the aroma, but the taste starts to assert itself. But this is interesting: for the fourth and fifth infusions, the aroma seems to shift to something more floral — ginger flower maybe, but I’ve never smelled a ginger flower that I remember. Definitely less peachy and more flower, though. And the taste is now way up front. More wood and nuts and spice. Dry, spreading horizontal to edges of tongue, brilliant feeling in my throat. I wonder if this one, this infusion, is the tea’s “true” character. I took a walk as the rain withdrew and the back-of-the-throat feel stayed with me. I will try more in the morning.

Preparation
0 min, 15 sec
Thomas Smith

I’m only familiar with California native wild ginger in terms of the flower fragrance. Definitely has a unique, lightly resinous spice note to it. I imagine making a rosewater mixing sorrel leaves and a few cloves in with the rose petals (and maybe an intact bit of cinnamon bark or cedar wood) would produce a distillation that has a similar aroma.

teaddict

Had a delightful session with a Bangwai puerh tonight, but now I want to start over with the Po Tou. I did see lots of wild ginger plants in Hawaii, but do not remember their scent. I will have to try to find it in this tea next time I brew it, maybe tomorrow. Might be time to finally do the Chao Zhou pot vs gaiwan comparison.

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94

Dan Cong tea is shrouded in seductive mystery for me, thanks in part to Imen, proprietor of Tea Habitat, and her blog Tea Obsession. As I understand it, each single bush of the ancient “originals” had a singular scent that often seemed to mimic other flowers. The Communist Party organized some of these fragrances as generic categories to use for labels for commercial teas, so a lot of different teas can be “Ginger Flower.” I don’t think this Po Tou is claimed to be from a “mother tree,” but it is claimed to be from a single bush or group of bushes derived from the old one. This is not your commercial PG Tips (it’s nearly $50/ounce).
I got this tea because of Teaddict’s helpful recommendation (thanks!). This tea is really worth spending time with. The aroma is like fresh flowers after a rain and just underneath definite stone fruit flavors like nectarines. The flowers and fruits seem inseparable. The spices demand attention at the edges of your tongue. Swallow and you get this pleasant back-of-the-throat feel. Joyfulness unbounded! Later infusions are sweet and mellow. The spice subsides and the nectar of the flowers remain, very round, still with fruit flavors.
Dan Cong is reputed to be difficult to brew. I followed Teaddict’s brew and it was perfect. Preheat the pot to enjoy aroma of dried leaves. My 120ml pot was half full of the long leaves. Water almost at a boil. I would suggest that the first infusion may be slightly longer than the next to open up the leaves. But too long will definitely produce some bitterness. I’m not sure you have to rinse this tea. I drank the first rinse straight from the serving pitcher — I couldn’t stop myself!

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 15 sec
teaddict

If I rinse this one, I only do a flash rinse—hot water in & out, maybe 10 seconds at most—then enjoy the scent of the hot damp leaves, and start brewing. So glad you’re enjoying it!

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90

Sadly finished off this tea tonight, a nice set of last infusions, although the leaf seems to have given up a little earlier than I’d have expected. Sigh.

Have finished or nearly finished a few other Dan Congs from Tea Habitat—soon will be able to justify another order!

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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90

A near perfect gongfu session tonight—a little tea, a little gaiwan, tap water about 185 degrees, and many infusions of varying lengths demonstrating sweetness, spiciness, fruitiness, floral essences, over and over in different proportions. It’s been a while since my last Dan Cong session—too long!

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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90

This has been a tricky tea for me. It has very strong spicy flavor and astringency that can easily overpower the lighter floral notes. But when I get it just right, like tonight’s infusion, it is sweet, spicy, floral, with that extra complexity that just makes the best Dan Cong teas sing. And tonight, it’s doing a floral aria on my taste buds.

I wish I could give coherent brewing suggestions, but I can’t, because I lightly and thinly scattered the leaves over the brewing screen of my Kamjove, poured through water from my Pino set to about 190 degrees but didn’t check the temps before the infusions, and then didn’t pay attention to brewing times—1 minute? 2 minutes?—and mixed the two infusions together.

I was trying to prepare a pint of nice brew to share with some colleagues working late, so needed a larger set of infusions than I easily get from my small gaiwans, and tasted along the way rather than measured. Anyway, this came out so nice that I am going to let this tea out of the ‘doghouse’. Will try to get the same results with a more measured brewing and report back; I’m thinking maybe 0.5 grams in my 60mL gaiwan or the 60 mL Chao Zhou pot to start.

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 1 min, 0 sec

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94

I make this by filling a 120ml pot about 2/3 full of tea leaves, then I use water at fish eyes and first infusions very fast, a minute or less. I get the most amazing floral aroma and the taste of peaches or nectarines. I actually get giddy drinking this tea it is so good. Imen’s teas are expensive but well worth the investment. I’ve tried 8 immortals Ba Xian teas from other vendors and they can’t rise to this level. Highly recommended.

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 1 min, 0 sec

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89

Another Dan Cong finishing tonight. Fruity sweet and just a little Dan Cong spice, so pleasant and mellow and lovely. This was one of Imen’s recommendations for me getting started with Dan Congs. Mmmm. But this is the last of the pouch.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 30 sec
deftea

Yes, but aren’t these DCs truly wonderful?! Imen really does have the advantage here.

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89

Probably the mellowest of the Dan Congs I first tried from Tea Habitat. It is hard to make this one harsh, and the mellow delights just keep coming, infusion after infusion, tart & sweet, and a little spicy.

I start with a modest leaf to water ratio (0.5g per oz/30mL) and infuse over and over, 15-20+ times.

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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96

Tried this last night in my new Chao Zhou teapot from Tea Habitat, and compared it to a porcelain gaiwan. I’d recently tried one of my other Dan Congs in the Chao Zhou, and that particular infusion seemed to lack a lot of the high notes from the tea, so I was a little worried about that. This is a young pot, having been used only perhaps a dozen times since first seasoning, so I suspected it of taking more than giving to the teas.

As it turned out, I could not tell any difference. Both were fruity, sweet, spicy. I will continue to use the pot and work on its seasoning without worries. But I am almost out of the Po Tou, so there will not be very many more infusions to come.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 15 sec
deftea

I think we have the same pot.

Thomas Smith

Hmm, I’ve been eying one for a while now and now I think I won’t buy it. I already have an yixing pot I’ve been using for some time with dancongs and it feel like it would be a waste of all that effort and a perfectly good pot to start over. Thanks for your comparison to the gaiwan!

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96

Today was the first time I brewed this up in the Chao Zhou pot I got from Imen. I am not sure if that was what made the difference, but the tea was definitely sweeter, mellower, more rounded, almost too much so.

I clearly need to do a head-to-head with the same tea in a gaiwan.

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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96

This is a wonderful, brilliant tea. Spicy, fruity, sweet, and with complexity and depth to carry through many infusions.

I have generally given up before the tea has, somewhere around 20 to 25 infusions.

The dry leaves are long, twisted, and open up into reddish green when infused. They don’t smell like much until they hit the prewarmed infusion vessel, and then the scent starts to grow strong and exotic. The spicy scent remains in the leaves after many infusions, promising more goodness to come.

I use about 1 gram of leaf per ounce or 30mL water, use a small yixing or gaiwan, and keep infusing over hours or leave the leaves overnight, do a flash rinse with boiling water, and keep going the next day. Water 185-195 degrees, and infusions that start at about 15 seconds but later extend to a couple of minutes. You do have to watch this one—it is not quite as friendly as the Honey Orchid “commercial” Dan Cong I got at Imen’s recommendation as a ’beginner’s Dan Cong’—this one can get bitter if you abuse it. But if you work with it gently, such a wonderful, wonderful tea.

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 0 min, 15 sec

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96

Today I had a delightful time with this tea, brewed in my gaiwan, and enjoyed for a few hours. Yup, hours. It’s remarkable how much it gives and how forgiving it can be (when I remember to not cook it in too-hot a bath).

There’s something about sipping this tea that centers and soothes. I found calm on a Monday.

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96

So today I was a little testy. You know, not quite in a good mood, and trying to get through to Friday, smiling. About mid-morning, I needed a pick-me-up, without a lot of caffeine. I dumped a small heap of this in a mug, and it saw me through a rough patch.

Something about drinking tea flowers is uplifting. It’s not overly sweet tasting, but you feel a little sweeter afterward.

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96

This is a deeply sensual tea, aged to complexity, that can be steeped more than 20 times, and keeps on giving flavorful cups. It took a while for me to be able to get any decent flavor in this at home. If you try it, don’t give up. The water needs to be just off boiling, not cooled, and I steep no less than a tablespoon, mostly a bit more, at a time. Best in my smallest guywan.

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