Typhoo

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drank Typhoo Decaf by Typhoo
1941 tasting notes

Wow. Summer! And I am so glad I have found a close-to-foolproof decaf with some heft that tastes like tea, even when you ice it down. Pretty good stuff.

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drank Typhoo Decaf by Typhoo
1941 tasting notes

This is fast turning into a favorite. Quick and easy decaf that doesn’t taste watery or chemically, and a kitten-teeth size bite that makes it clear you’re still drinking tea.

Rabbit chasing: was watching a Call the Midwife rerun yesterday—I just love Sister Monica Joan and her rabid, unfulfilled sweet tooth. As she welcomed a new nurse, she said resignedly, “Were it up to me, I would offer you China or India tea—alas, we have nothing but Ty-phoo.” (This may be a fans-only chuckle, but I sure did.)

ashmanra

I wish I could remember what I watched recently in which a character asks “China or India?” when preparing tea for a guest. Possibly Sherlock? Something British, surely.

gmathis

That’s also the final line in one of my favorite detective novels—“The Limehouse Text” by Will Thomas. (Have I turned you on to that series?)

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drank Typhoo Decaf by Typhoo
1941 tasting notes

Another review of this calls it “The king of bagged decaf black tea." Not sure about king, but I’d certainly dub it an Earl. Maybe a Viscount. (Isn’t that what Edith’s Downton Abbey sweetie is?) After a five minute steep, it was dark like a good morning builders’ tea…with a recognizable bit of sharp builders’ tea flavor. Well done, Ty-phoo!

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72
drank English Breakfast by Typhoo
13 tasting notes

No notes yet. Add one?

Preparation
Boiling

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72
drank English Breakfast by Typhoo
13 tasting notes

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Preparation
Boiling 8 min or more

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72
drank English Breakfast by Typhoo
13 tasting notes

No notes yet. Add one?

Preparation
Boiling 8 min or more

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72
drank English Breakfast by Typhoo
13 tasting notes

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72
drank English Breakfast by Typhoo
13 tasting notes

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77
drank English Breakfast by Typhoo
37 tasting notes

Trying as many brands of British tea as I can right now. Next on the list is Barry’s Tea. Typhoo is ok, but I still prefer Yorkshire (best of the best) and PG Tips (second best). As a former coffee drinker I need to brew this extra strong, with 3 bags in the pot at least.

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67

this tea delivers a smooth cup with almost no aftertaste and the caffeine content seems higher than average too. however, i am honestly not sure how to describe the flavor of this one. it surely has a flavor because even with extra sugar, the tea flavor remains unaltered and the sweet flavor i want never shows up. perhaps the word for the flavor is whatever the opposite of malty is, unsure, but it is definitely not weak. i made 3 full pots and 2 more cups of varying strength and steeping time. i simply could not find a combination i would want to drink everyday. i also sent it to my girlfriends house who lives with 2 other tea drinkers and the only person who drank it more than once in that house was me and it was only because she kept making it for me since she thought i wanted her to do so…

further, this blend is made without any teas from africa and i am wondering if that may be what is missing for me in the flavor. (i ended up combining the remaining 5+ tbsp with an equal portion of taylors of harrogate pure assam and then added a small amount of scottish breakfast as well.)

Preparation
Boiling 4 min, 30 sec 4 tsp 45 OZ / 1330 ML

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85
drank English Breakfast by Typhoo
48 tasting notes

I like to keep bagged black tea for the mornings that I can have with milk and sugar, and after trying so many brands, I thought I should finally give Typhoo a try. Well, it’s not bad at all. Nothing special about it, but nothing to complain about either. Standard black tea seems to be a good description. I like this better than PG Tips, which had a woody aftertaste that I was not very fond of.

Preparation
Boiling 3 min, 30 sec

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100
drank Typhoo Decaf by Typhoo
52 tasting notes

The king of bagged decaf black tea. Accept no substitutes!

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81
drank English Breakfast by Typhoo
11 tasting notes

A very good everyday tea. I love it with two sugars and a splash of almond milk.

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81
drank English Breakfast by Typhoo
11 tasting notes

This is also a good everyday tea. Very smooth and even. Like it a lot.

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40

A little too malty for my tastes. Better than many teas in the same price range, but this is very much an acquired taste.

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 2 min, 15 sec

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40
drank Leaf Tea (Loose Leaf) by Typhoo
18 tasting notes

It’s tiny crumbs of tea. The smallest ones fall through my filter. As you’d expect, the water darkens really fast, and the taste isn’t great. It might be OK in bags for everyday use but it’s too frustrating in this form.

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drank English Breakfast by Typhoo
2 tasting notes

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drank English Breakfast by Typhoo
110 tasting notes

When I ran out of PG Tips (which I often drink for my morning tea when I am not interested in subtlety, but just need to wake up), I saw a small box of this at the tea shop and decided to give it a try to compare. I’m gonna stick with PG Tips. This is decent, basic black tea in the same sort of style, but it doesn’t have as much flavor to me. I’m just more fond of the PG Tips.

Josie Jade

I LOVE PG Tips too!

gmathis

I’m slathering for my favorite store to restock PG tips looseleaf (they sold by the ounce); they have this; it may have to be my fallback.

Rachel J

Oh, and around here, Typhoo is really hard to find anyway and more expensive. I’m glad I didn’t like it better than PG!

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drank English Breakfast by Typhoo
60 tasting notes

improbably this tea appeared in our local Canadian grocery store a few months ago & i’ve been hankering to try it. it’s a serviceable tea, a tea drinker’s tea. tastes similar to Red Rose, an old family favourite. it is tea I believe my Yorkshire parents would find acceptable. at 4 minutes steeped, with the addition of one sugar cube & a dollop of milk, it is just the right strength. this is the tea you serve to a person who has had an emotional upset. it will soothe them.

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drank English Breakfast by Typhoo
2 tasting notes

First steeping was ok, meaning medium strong flavor. Aroma not that strong, perhaps because the tea leaves were like coffee grounds. I will drink it if I have nothing else. Onward with my tea seach!

Preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 4 min, 0 sec

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drank Typhoo Decaf by Typhoo
4 tasting notes

This is the standard British black tea I drink multiple times per day w milk & half teaspoon sugar

Kati

It’s not my favourite decaf black tea but it’s what my mum bought in bulk on Amazon :/

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drank English Breakfast by Typhoo
2199 tasting notes

Since I thought Typhoo was a little weak at 2 1/2 minutes, we decided to try it at 4 minutes. It is definitely stronger, but I can’t say I like it any better! I wouldn’t even want it without milk and sugar, and even with milk and sugar I would rather have a glass of water! I was glad for the opportunity to try it, though!

Preparation
Boiling

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drank English Breakfast by Typhoo
2199 tasting notes

I am drinking this tea courtesy of a lovely couple we just met in a stained glass shop. They live in Ireland (he is Irish, she is British) and vacation here every year, and bring their tea with them! They shared several sachets of Typhoo when I mentioned that I like tea.

I only steeped this for a couple of minutes due to my experience with Clipper Gold, which needs merely to be shown the hot water and then whisked away. I think it is a little on the weak side, so next time I will steep longer. It is not a tea full of nuance, but rather a very standard tea – not nearly as strong as the English breakfast teas I have had. Still, it is good to taste a new tea on the trip, and the best part was meeting sweet new people!

Preparation
Boiling 2 min, 30 sec

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drank Leaf Tea (Loose Leaf) by Typhoo
1941 tasting notes

A treat—-was able to pick up an experimental ounce bulk at my getting-better-all-the-time favorite little health food store. Looks just like PG tips—ground fine, but used in the same proportions, seems to be just a tetch lighter and brighter in flavor (not in appearance). Would have to do a side-by-side comparison to be sure, and tea geeky as I am, I’d love to do that, but time is going to be a tight commodity this week. (Sigh. Not a great thought for an early Monday morning.)

Michelle Butler Hallett

Oooh, Typhoo. Haven’t sipped that in years. Must keep my eye out for the loose version.

ashmanra

gmathis, I love you! You made my day by saying “tetch”. I haven’t heard that since my mom passed away. My oldest relatives used tetched, het, yonder, riled up, and such regularly! I know exactly how much is “a mess” of collards. Sigh. The Southern language is truly a child of Shakespeare, having descended nearly unchanged from Elizabethan English.

gmathis

Yep—a mess of spinach for salad, and it looks like it’s clabberin’ up to rain outside today. Just holler if you want to compare further Ozark/Southern Missouri vocabulary words… and if you haven’t read “Christy,” you need to, for the colloquialisms alone!

Michelle Butler Hallett

Souther US English bears some resemblance to Newfoundland English, which remained very much unchanged from the late 1600s to about mid-20th century. Back in university, I sounded out a phonetics-written speech from Shakespeare (Juliet, “What’s in a name?”)m the phonetics supposedly showing how Elizabethans pronounced the words. Know what I heard? A blend of Newfoundland and souther US accents.

I’m all for learning to read and write in Standard English, but the dialects are often much richer in vocab. Cuppa tay, now.

Michelle Butler Hallett

You might hear “tetch” here, too. More often pronoucned “titch.”

gmathis

In the book I’m going on and on about (set in Cutter Gap, Tennessee, circa 1912), one of the discoveries of the main character is the wealth of Scots-Irish heritage that’s been buried under years of neglect, including the ballads that hearken back to Bonnie Prince Charlie.

ashmanra

Since I was a musician and performer from age 7, many people thought I was British when I was growing up! I spoke like the people I listened to all the time – namely Rex Harrison and Christopher Plummer – my heroes! But I can do terrific impressions of several Southern accents and lapse into one when I speak to a real Southerner. The Southern Belle is the most fun. My elder sister actually speaks that way! She used to lean toward me when my parents best friends visited and whisper, “They don’t know better, they’re Yankees.”

Someone asked me once if we pronounced “aunt” as “awnt” or “ant.” The answer was….neither! If you are saying, “This is my aunt,” you pronounced it “ant.” But if you were calling your aunt by name, it was “aint!” I had an Aint Ethel, and Aint Inez, and Aint Neal….they would have died laughing if we had said “awnt” and would have accused us of putting on airs!

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