Verdant Tea

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Recent Tasting Notes

50

This tea has a very robust and rasping mouth feel. It was very two dimensional and reminded me very of your typical CTC Assam. If not for the honeysuckle and orchid in the aftertaste I would’ve thought it was a full leaf second flush Assam.

I brewed this gong fu style. My first brewing was 10 seconds +5 seconds for each additional brewing. I did a total of 10 but it flat lined after the second brewing.

Flavors: Honeysuckle, Malt, Orchid

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 5 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

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75
drank Yunnan White Jasmine by Verdant Tea
11 tasting notes

I made this tea in more than one way: I did western (given) as well as gong fu style. For gong fu I used 5g/120ml starting with 6 seconds +3 for each additional brewing. I added on 10 seconds for each additional western brewing.

I say “no” to recommending this tea because the first time I bought it, this tea was of absolutely fantastic quality. The second it was “meh”. The 75 is an average of the two bags. The mouthfeel was fairly smooth and full. The first order had a long finish to it and not a hint of astringency. My second order had a hint of astringency but it wasn’t abrasive. The finish was full but short.

Flavors: Cream, Green Beans, Jasmine, Melon, Strawberry, Vanilla

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 30 sec 5 g 8 OZ / 237 ML

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Smooth and rich malt with a fairly thick texture and sustained notes of baked bread and toast. This isn’t a complex tea, but I still found it quite enjoyable.

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95

I picked this up up on a whim while ordering from Verdant because it sounded intriguing and I’m glad I did. This is one freaking delicious tea. As a fan of their Laoshan green teas, I consider this an upgrade. It has the characteristic Laoshan flavor but it’s richer and more complex.

The dry leaf has a deep vegetal and nutty aroma. In a heated gaiwan, that changes to a stronger umami like fragrance. The wet leaf smells like fresh steamed green vegetables – spinach, asparagus, and chard. Tea brews up like regular Laoshan green tea, but thicker and fuller bodied. Flavor is creamy, sweet, and lightly floral with a pleasant nuttiness hanging in the background. There’s a grassiness to it reminiscent of Japanese green tea that I love and balanced with an element of fresh green vegetables. It’s also really good cold steeped and amps up floral flavor.

This is easily the best bi luo chun I’ve ever had. I continue to be impressed by Verdant’s green teas. Every single one I’ve tried so far has been nothing short of phenomenal and this was no exception. Their tasting notes for this one were totally on point.

Flavors: Asparagus, Floral, Grass, Lettuce, Spinach

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 1 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 5 OZ / 150 ML

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95

Oh my goshhhh.

This is my first tasting of this tea and I am blown away. At the same time, I am also listening to alpha brainwave music that has been influenced by traditional Buddhist meditation music and the combination of these two.. really transport..me..somewhere…

Ooh zoned out nicely for a sec there.

I have no idea what aloeswood is, but my favourite thing about this oolong is definitely the aromas of incense. Warm and solemn, it brings back the memory of my time in the temples of China and Japan.

For all of the oolongs I have tried from Verdant, every one of them has been absolutely on point with their tasting notes. This one lists vanilla, jasmine, whipped cream, brioche, aloeswood incense and a hint of tamarind.

I am also unsure what tamarind is, but this oolong is every bit as beautiful as written.

Brewing this Western style as per website instructions. The other thing I love about Verdant oolongs is just how quickly the leaf seems to give flavour into the water. As in, the moment I pour the water into my glass teapot, the colour of the tea is already so pretty. And yet, the leaf keeps giving through multiple infusions.

Only really on a second steep of this one, but if it’s anything like my cherished Laoshan Roasted Oolong, these leaves will last me all day long.

This might just be my highest rated tea on Steepster…

Super Starling!

Tamarind is this really cool tree-fruit that grows in Africa in these pod things. I think it flavors Worchestershire sauce and lots of Indian food. I really want to try out this Buddhist music. Is there any on Spotify? Artists you can recommend?

Gooseberry Spoon

It’s also common in Thai food. It’s got a sweet and sour flavor that probably most noticeable in pad Thai. You can buy bricks of the pulp and seeds in Asian groceries that you then need to soak in hot water to get the pulp.

Cathy Baratheon

It’s not quite Buddhist music although it does draw from the influence. I listen to YellowBrickCinema on Youtube; they say it promotes alpha brainwaves and helps with focus as well as relaxation. Works for me!

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78

This tea is a light oolong that is yellow in color with a vegetal aroma. It has a green tea taste that is sweet with flavors of soybean and asparagus. I feel like I am drinking a green tea instead of an oolong.

Flavors: Asparagus, Soybean

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 5 g 5 OZ / 147 ML

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49

I received a 5 gram sample packet of this oolong following a mix-up with a recent order. Prior to the introduction of US forwarding, Verdant, as I’m sure pretty much all of you are well aware, shipped their orders from China. Well, an order of mine from May simply disappeared. When I say that it disappeared, I mean the order had been filled and was shipped, but it could not be located in the China Post system period. There was no record of it anywhere. So, the folks at Verdant Tea were gracious enough to work with me, refunded my order, and as compensation for the lost order, tacked a ton of free samples onto my next order. This was one of them.

I prepared this tea gongfu style using the suggested brewing method on the Verdant Tea website. Since the other two reviewers on Steepster seemed to have concerns about the strength of this tea’s flavor, I opted to use the full 5 gram sample in my 4 ounce gaiwan. I like my oolongs strong, as those of you who read my reviews are well aware (5-6 grams in a 4 ounce gaiwan is normal for me). Following the rinse, I steeped the full 5 grams of loose tea leaves in 4 ounces of 208 F water for 10 seconds. I followed this infusion with 7 additional infusions at 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, and 24 seconds respectively.

Following the rinse, I detected intense aromas of ginseng, nectarine, green apple, toasted sesame, kale, spinach, artichoke, sweetgrass, and marigold, with perhaps a hint of chrysanthemum. The initial infusion produced a similarly strong nose, coupled with intense notes of toasted sesame, alfalfa sprouts, artichoke, kale, fresh spinach, watercress, sweetgrass, and damp hay balanced by much subtler notes of marigold, chrysanthemum, cream, butter, green apple, nectarine, white grape, and ginseng. The second and third infusions presented a much fruitier and somewhat more floral nose. In the mouth, I detected stronger notes of green apple, nectarine, marigold, white grape, cream, and butter, balanced by slightly more reserved notes of toasted sesame, watercress, sweetgrass, kale, spinach, hay, and artichoke. The fourth infusion was, for me, where this tea started to go downhill fast. The tea began to lose its savory, herbal, fruity, and floral characteristics quickly (though they never entirely disappeared) and began to increasingly emphasize grassy, vegetal, and mineral aromas and flavors. I made it through a full eight infusions, though I pretty much lost all interest after six.

I do not really know what to say about this one. Despite some of their flaws (marketing gaffes, unbelievable claims, etc.), I tend to be a big fan of Verdant Tea. I am even a big fan of Master Zhang’s collection, from which this particular oolong comes. I more or less loved the regular Mao Xie Verdant offered this year, and tend to be something of a fan of Mao Xie in general, but this reserve version started off really strong and turned into a total disappointment in my eyes. I think the fact that this is presented as being a step above the regular Mao Xie makes it even worse for me. I tend to not be a big fan of labeling tea based on some opaque measure of quality on the part of a particular farmer and/or vendor, so terms like “reserve” mean very little to me, and to be perfectly frank here, this tea reminds me of why I feel this way. I simply can’t recommend this one. If you have to try a Mao Xie from Verdant and do not want the traditional roasted version, wait for the next release of Master Zhang’s regular Mao Xie or see if you can find someone willing to swap a few grams of this year’s release.

Flavors: Artichoke, Butter, Cream, Floral, Fruity, Grass, Green Apple, Hay, Kale, Spinach, White Grapes

Preparation
Boiling 5 g 4 OZ / 118 ML

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93

As of today, I’m still mowing down the oolongs. After a solid week of 24/7 on-call duty with my local crisis response team, I was in desperate need of something to help me wake up this morning. I wasn’t feeling black tea, so I decided to stay the course and keep plowing through my reserve of oolongs. Today, this Laoshan Roasted Oolong got the nod.

This tea is from the May 2015 picking and was first released last Autumn. I purchased this one in either April or May, but only started drinking it in late July. I prepared this tea gongfu style, but kind of went against Verdant Tea’s suggestions. Following a quick rinse, I steeped 6 grams of this tea in 4 ounces of 208 F water for 10 seconds. I followed this up with 12 additional infusions with an increase of 2 seconds per infusion. So, steep times were as follows: 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34 seconds.

The aroma of the infused brew was absolutely lovely. I detected rich, robust aromas of chocolate, black cherry, vanilla bean, cream, oatmeal, and rye toast. In the mouth, the first 3 infusions presented a lovely mixture of brown sugar, sweet potato, black cherry, candied orange peel, vanilla bean, cream, oatmeal, chocolate, toasted bran, and rye toast notes. The next 4-5 infusions were milder in aroma, offering somewhat delicate scents of chocolate, cherry, cream, oatmeal, and vanilla with a slight mineral tinge. In the mouth, I noticed that all of the flavors remained intact, but were milder, smoother, and more balanced. A slight mineral flavor had also started to emerge. Through the remainder of infusions, the aromas and flavors continued to grow milder as the tea faded. The mineral aromas and flavors started to become more dominant, though I noticed that traces of candied orange peel, black cherry, sweet potato, vanilla bean, rye toast, and chocolate were still detectable when I really focused my attention on the sensations I was experiencing.

I’m seriously impressed with this roasted oolong. So far, I have yet to be disappointed by Verdant’s Laoshan offerings. Compared to the almost equally excellent Laoshan Green Oolong offered by Verdant, this tea is stronger and more complex, and if monitored rather closely, can really hold its own in a longer session. As far as roasted oolongs go, it is also very approachable, as it lacks the overly strong roasted character that can be so off-putting for some people and it does not shock the nose or palate with turbulent combinations of aromas and flavors. All in all, I think this tea could please the oolong neophyte and the serious, experienced oolong drinker equally. I recommend it very highly and without reservation to anyone looking for a consistent and enjoyable oolong.

Flavors: Brown Sugar, Cherry, Chocolate, Cream, Oats, Orange, Rye, Sweet Potatoes, Toast, Vanilla

Preparation
Boiling 6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML
Daylon R Thomas

This tea was one of my favorites. :) It’s just expensive for me personally. I prefer it to most of the Laoshan blacks I’ve had because it is much smoother to me.

R.F. Hill

I agree with you, Daylon; it’s a great tea, but too pricey.

eastkyteaguy

I agree with you guys. The He Family Collection was what turned me on to Verdant in the first place. I do not think I have had a bad Laoshan tea from them. This one is probably my favorite.

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79

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Delicious, savory black tea. Smooth and balanced with considerable complexity. Miso soup, cacao nibs, and melted butter. $71 USD / 100g.

Flavors: Butter, Cacao, Cream, Dates, Dried Fruit, Honey, Molasses, Pleasantly Sour, Rose, Smoke, Spicy, Umami, Wood

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 0 min, 15 sec 5 g 4 OZ / 125 ML

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73

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This tea has many of the characteristics of sheng pu’erh without the bitterness (it is a black tea after all). Dried apricots and complexity from the wild growing environment. Relatively complex and nice layering of flavor. Not the most impressive black out there, but a great value at $20 USD / 100g.

Flavors: Apricot, Fruity, Malt, Marine, Nutty, Pleasantly Sour, Red Wine, Soybean, Thick

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 0 min, 15 sec 4 g 4 OZ / 125 ML

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56

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Representative of the modern, obnoxiously floral, green tieguanyins. Über-floral with a thick butter flavor – an overwhelming and slightly unpleasant combo. Not my thing, so I don’t recommend it, though this style is the most popular nowadays in China. I much prefer the traditional, darker roasted styles of tieguanyin – they’re much more complex and balanced. This modern green style just seems like its trying (and failing) to mimic the delicious light oolong styles from Taiwan.

Flavors: Butter, Floral

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 0 min, 15 sec 4 g 4 OZ / 125 ML

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74

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Great value sheng pu’erh. Nice and balanced, great as a beginner’s sheng, but very satisfying. Sweet and airy.

Flavors: Dirt, Dry Grass, Hay, Lavender, Mineral, Nectar, Stonefruits, Sugarcane, Sweet, Wet Wood

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 5 g 4 OZ / 125 ML

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50

Nope.

Nopenopenope.

There are interesting flavors in here. Unfortunately, they’re hidden behind the taste of hamster bedding and ashes. I gave it 2 rinses and 4 steepings to mellow out before calling it quits.

Clearly, this is not the tea for me.

Flavors: Ash, Camphor, Cedar, Dirt, Pine

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 5 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

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57

For a key to my rating scale, check out my bio.


Closer in flavor to a Phoenix Oolong – not classic Big Red Robe in any sense – too lightly roasted/oxidized.

Flavors: Bitter, Black Currant, Citrus, Grass

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 15 sec 5 g 4 OZ / 125 ML

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70
drank Mei Zhan by Verdant Tea
39 tasting notes

A fairly floral aroma and a bit of a stonefruit taste. Nice mineral notes. There’s an aged quality to the flavor, too, despite the date of picking being May 2015. Not much of a finish. All-around a nice tea. Reminds me a bit of phoenix oolongs, though more subdued.

Flavors: Earth, Mineral, Stonefruits

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 4 g 6 OZ / 180 ML

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drank Laoshan Black by Verdant Tea
2183 tasting notes

I had an elderly sample of this, and my attempt to drink up all the older teas continues so I served this at tea time on Tuesday as well as Wednesday after lunch.

Both times we served Swedish Pastry Ring that my youngest made and it was SOOOO GOOD. She asked which I preferred – the Kringle or the Pastry Ring, but it was really apples and oranges. The Kringle was so light and fluffy and soft, it really me so much of a Krispy Kreme glazed doughnut but with nuts, butter, and brown sugar in the middle. The Swedish Pastry Ring had an entirely different texture but was equally heavenly. The pastry had more body and was like a truly delectable sweet pie crust. The browned butter glaze sent me right over the moon.

The tea – this was surprisingly light for a black tea. The friend who had it with me the second day used to love black tea most of all, then found her taste switch to Puerh, then white or green. She enjoyed this, and I think it helped that it is a very light and mild black tea, not drying, and with a lot of oolong characteristics going on, including that signature mineral aftertaste. Sweet stuff!

Evol Ving Ness

When you say elderly, what does that mean in this case?

Fjellrev

Probably just a sample that’s been sitting around for quite a while and is getting old/stale?

ashmanra

It was a sample. I can’t remember where it came from – a swap or the five for $5 offer, but I think the very “youngest” it can be is a year, and it had been opened. It was still very tasty, though!

Evol Ving Ness

Hmm, so a year or more is elderly. Thanks for clarifying.

ashmanra

If it had been in a good tin I would keep it for three years with no problem, but it was a sample in a brown envelope with the top folded and a clothespin on it! I feel like that ages faster than a double lidded tin would allow. Thus my designation! I am trying to drink oldest samples first, and samples that I failed to store well. They are good, so I won’t chuck them out, but they do need to be used ASAP, especially to reduce clutter as we renovate our kitchen since my “tea center” is being moved.

Evol Ving Ness

Yes, got it! Now I totally get it. And kitchen reno, how exciting! But the tea centre being moved, now that’s got to be traumatic!

ashmanra

It’s exciting actually! The rest of the reno is traumatic, tho! LOL Hubby is doing it all himself. Raising the cabinets, painting them, changing the doors, tearing out a soffit, pulling up two underlayments and three layers of vinyl…But I get my own cabinet top and bottom with countertop for the kettle and storage for all the tea and teaware!! Squeeee! And I don’t have any loss of use (for tea) the way he is doing it. Might not be able to cook for a few days, but who cares? We have tea!

Evol Ving Ness

Yes, that’s the most important. :)

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89
drank Laoshan Black by Verdant Tea
18 tasting notes

This was a really pleasant tea, and this means something coming from a person who doesn’t often enjoy straight black tea! I prepared this gong fu style, and it performed very well! A lot of chocolate, but there are some lower notes of nuts and baked goods

Flavors: Baked Bread, Chocolate, Cocoa, Roast nuts

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 30 sec 4 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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40

This tea has earned my lowest marks ever, as it almost tastes like nothing. I mean there’s subtlety and then there’s flavorlessness. This was essentially flavorless. The scent is that of a nice green oolong, but it came off as little more than hot water on the palate.

On subsequent tastings with it, I nearly doubled the recommended amount of tea. Then I got some light vegetal notes. I shouldn’t have to steep $4 worth of tea leaves in a little water in order to taste something. I have plenty of other teas that could blow my mind for the same price, whether they’re robust aged teas or dainty whites.

Flavors: Vegetal

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 30 sec 10 g 6 OZ / 180 ML
MrQuackers

Any luck with a lower temp?

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92

It is pretty much known at this point that Tieguanyin is one of the most popular and historically revered oolongs on the market. I don’t really need to tell anyone that. What some people may not realize, however, is that the methods used to produce Tieguanyin have varied considerably over the years. Today, many of the Tieguanyins on the market are produced in the so-called contemporary or green style. These teas are not heavily roasted and are often designed to showcase the aromas and flavors produced during a particular year or growing season. From these teas, one can expect lots of rich, creamy aromas and flavors as well as delicate, sweet floral tones. This tea, on the other hand, is produced in the traditional style, meaning that the tea is more heavily roasted. Obviously, this is going to taste very little like many contemporary Tieguanyins.

I prepared this tea more or less according to the gongfu method recommended on the Verdant Tea website. I steeped 6 grams of loose tea leaves in 4 ounces of 208 F water for 10 seconds following a quick rinse. I performed nine additional infusions with an increase of 2 seconds per infusion (10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28 seconds). I would have kept going for at least a couple more infusions, but was pressed for time. It is important to note that I did rotate the leaves after the fifth infusion in order to reinvigorate the tea and keep it from settling in on itself.

The initial infusions produced an extremely aromatic liquor. I picked up really deep, complex aromas of butter, hay, wood, cinnamon, vanilla bean, graham cracker, cream, orchid, violet, caramel, coffee, ripe banana, and minerals. In the mouth, the early infusions were bursting with flavor. I easily detected notes of butter, hay, grass, wood, coffee, minerals, smoke, kettle corn, vanilla bean, cinnamon, caramelized banana, orchid, violet, cream, and roasted nuts. I know that I sometimes chuckle at Verdant’s tasting notes, but honestly, I found the descriptions of caramelized banana, graham cracker, cinnamon, and violet in the flavor of this tea to be amazingly accurate. The middle infusions packed robust aromas and flavors, but were smoother and more balanced. I began to notice the floral and cinnamon notes recede somewhat, though the other flavors described above remained distinct. I did, however, note that the hay, grass, butter, and mineral notes grew steadily more pronounced on these infusions. The last couple of infusions saw the mineral, grass, hay, kettle corn, and butter notes remain, though they were underscored by persistent hints of cinnamon, vanilla bean, wood, coffee, and caramelized banana.

For me, this tea was a lot to take in, but I really enjoyed it. I have at least a little bit of familiarity with the more traditional roasted Tieguanyins, and I can honestly say that I do not have much of a problem with this one. I will say that this is not a tea I could drink every day, or even on a regular basis. There is just so much going on with it that it can be a little daunting to try to analyze all of the sensations I get from it. I can’t help but grade it highly and recommend it, however, because it is very complex, very unique, and very tasty in its own slightly peculiar way. If you are a fan of roasted oolongs, definitely try this one, but if you are a fan of the sweeter, more floral contemporary oolongs, you should still not pass on this one. It may not convert you, but you at least may be able to gain an appreciation and understanding of the traditional preparation.

Flavors: banana, Butter, Caramel, Cinnamon, Coffee, Cream, Graham, Grass, Hay, Kettle Corn, Mineral, Orchid, Roast nuts, Smoke, Vanilla, Violet, Wood

Preparation
Boiling 6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML
Evol Ving Ness

Who is the tea farmer that created this particular one?

eastkyteaguy

This tea was from Master Zhang’s collection.

Evol Ving Ness

Thank you. Hard to keep up with the Tieguanyins. :)

eastkyteaguy

No problem. Verdant’s Tieguanyin selection can be a tad confusing.

Evol Ving Ness

I find that too. Actually, I find the write-ups on Verdant teas on Steepster confusing because the name does not necessarily indicate which batch and which flavours emerge.

eastkyteaguy

Yeah, I have the same issue. I should have noted in my review that this was from the November 2015 picking. Right now, Verdant is offering a 2016 reserve version of this tea. I have a sample at home that I am hoping to get to fairly soon.

Evol Ving Ness

With Verdant’s offerings, we should all mention these details in our posts.

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60

Intensely boring. Verdant’s site says it’s supposed to taste of orange, orchid and vanilla. I get little more than indiscernible wafts of flavor + some minerality. By no means unpleasant, there’s just almost nothing to this tea. Perhaps stored or shipped poorly and degraded in flavor? I don’t know.

Flavors: Mineral

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 4 g 6 OZ / 180 ML

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70
drank Bai Ji Guan by Verdant Tea
39 tasting notes

Pleasant. Perhaps a bit too far toward the green end of the spectrum for my tastes. But I love the flavor of golden raisins and apple in this. It reminds me of certain Darjeelings, yet more robust and less floral. Can’t say I’d want to drink it all that often, but it’s nice.

Flavors: Apple, Grain, Green, Raisins

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 4 g 6 OZ / 180 ML

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80

This is one of my first teas from Verdant. I bought the 5 for $5 sample pack and was hooked. My first order was this and Yu Lu Yan Cha.

Actually, the tea I have is Qilan Light Roast, but this seems to be the page for the lightly roasted version of the tea, since there’s another page for Unroasted Qilan Wuyi Oolong.

So far this is my second time drinking this tea. It’s really floral, almost as if it’s been infused with flower petals, but it’s just the natural aroma of the tea cultivar. There’s another aroma, spicy and somewhat reminiscent of winter savory, an herb I have growing outside, and the mouthfeel is pretty dry.

Personally I really like floral aroma, and that’s why I chose this tea. When I bought it, I didn’t realize it was the same type as the Rare Orchid oolong that I bought from TeaSource, but I’m pleased because it’s delightful. Drinking flowers (so to speak) helps me relax. I might like it a little better if it weren’t so dry and had some savoriness to it.

Flavors: Flowers, Spicy, Tart

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 15 sec 2 tsp 5 OZ / 147 ML

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85

The classic oolong flavor. Floral, nutty, vegetal and sweet. A hint of buttery aftertaste. Very smooth, with almost no astringency.

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 30 sec 6 g 10 OZ / 295 ML

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55

The steeped leaves smell like cheap chocolate and cranberries. Yet the steeped tea itself smells like orange-flavored cheap chocolate. The mouthfeel is smooth, but I can’t get over how much it smells like a cheap European candy that’s been going stale a store shelf for the last 2 years. But hey, if that isn’t what’s conjured up for you by this tea, then you might really like it. Certainly, one of the smoothest and least overwhelming black teas I’ve ever had.

Flavors: Chocolate, Cranberry, Orange

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 30 sec 4 g 6 OZ / 180 ML
Sil

that’s so weird…all i get from this is chocolate/black tea smell :)

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