What-Cha

Edit Company

Recent Tasting Notes

82

Ah, today is a good day, Minecraft TU 25 is finally out, meaning we who play on the console finally inch closer to the PC version. Pros and cons, yay for finally having stained glass, I was immensely excited for the building potential presented with all the colorful glasses, especially when combining them with stained clay (my weakness.) Sadly the hinted at new biomes, all the flowers, and bunnies were not added with this update which is causing a massive wave of disappointment with the console players. Hopefully the next update will bring them out, I am craving the Ice Spike biome something fierce! I am wondering if they decided to do a small updated in time for Minecon, if so, I am ok with lots of small updates rather than months between big ones.

In grand traditional fashion, it is Wednesday, so time for a What-Cha tea! Flipping through my notebook I notice I am starting to run out of tea notes, le gasp! Clearly a shopping trip will be in my future, conveniently looking at the website I just noticed a ton of new teas, which is awesome. Today’s tea is Georgia Old Gentleman Black Tea, from the Nasakirali Village in Georgia, handmade by Iuri, who I am assuming is the old gentleman this tea is named for. The aroma of the lovely dark curling leaves is sweet, with notes of tobacco and cherry wood, a lovely fruity tobacco reminding me of my dad’s pipe tobacco. Add in a touch of smoke, delicate honey sweetness, and a tiny hint of cocoa and you have a very pleasant smelling tea. Honestly the aroma is nostalgic, like the smell of a pipe being smoked in a library, it gives me the warm fuzzies.

After giving the leaves a steeping, the now quite plump leaves have become malty and brisk, with notes of oak and cherry wood, raisins, and a tiny hint of citrus peel. It is very livening, and just a little bit sweet. The liquid is very rich, I was surprised, expecting a brisk aroma, but it is intensely rich with notes of pipe tobacco, cherry wood, a creamy sweetness with a finish of malt and raisins.

So, this cup has a lot going on, it is very rich, starting out with raisins and pipe tobacco with just a gentle hint of smoke, This transitions to a midtaste of citrus and malt, giving it a slight brisk and sour taste, this fades to a creamy sweet finish of cocoa. Amusingly the aftertaste was brisk with a slight dryness and a lingering taste of citrus. I found this tea enjoyable, it has a nostalgic feel and a complex blend of notes, plus the briskness was a perfect amount for me, not too intense, just enough to liven up the senses.

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2015/07/what-cha-georgia-old-gentleman-black.html

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

92

Finally managed to get around tasting this magnificent tea, on a lazy, warm, late afternoon. Just the smell promised a treat, and a treat it was…
The taste was fruity but tender, with hay notes present during every infusion. Speaking of, with my Gong Fu powered Gaiwan I managed to get 10(!) whole infusions before losing that precious taste. Sweet!

Recommended 9/10.

Gaiwan 100 ml, 3,33g for 5/10/15/20… sec @ 82°C

Flavors: Fruity, Hay, Pear

Preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 0 min, 15 sec 3 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

90

So, this was supposed to be posted yesterday, but I was super busy, swamped even, with deciding what I am doing with my life. No really, yours truly might be going on an epic adventure pretty soon! No spoilers yet, because I do not have all the details and such, but I can safely say I am excited and a little scared. Unless something goes drastically wrong (like my computer explodes again) it won’t affect the blog long term, there might be a week or so where I don’t update, but I will be sure to let everyone know ahead of time.

Since I missed my What-Cha Wednesday review, this will be a rare What-Cha Thursday! Today it is time to revisit the country of Malawi with Malawi Bvumbwe Handmade Treasure Black Tea, I was really blow away by their Antler and Peony White Teas, so I am super excited to dive into the Satemwa Estate’s Handmade Treasure Black Tea. For a while I was rather apprehensive about trying new black teas from Africa, a few nasty run-ins with some particularly dirty tasting Kenyan black teas unfairly soured me on the whole continent for a while. Really, quite narrow minded of me, but they were really gross. Anyway, onto more pleasant things, like these lovely twisted dark leaves! The aroma is pretty rich, blending notes of an oak brandy cask with roasted peanuts and yams, and a touch of loam and spice. Something about the way this tea smells reminds me of home, not any homes that I have lived in, but a feel of ‘home’ yes people, this tea smells like a concept to me.

After steeping the leaves (they get rather huge post steeping) and giving them a good sniffing, I am pleasantly surprised by the fruity notes that have now shown up. It has the oak wood and slight earthiness of the dry leaves, but now with a blend of cherries and orange zest with a hint of cocoa, oh yeah, and a spice finish. A little like allspice and a little like nutmeg, with a faint sweetness to go with it. The liquid has a lot more of the spice notes, definitely allspice with pepper, and a tiny hint of nutmeg. There are also strong notes of cocoa and cherry, with just a delicate hint of orange zest and distant flowers.

The tea has a definite briskness to it, and is quite bright, the texture is light and it really livens up the mouth, kinda like liquid sunshine for a morning wake up, without being really overbearing. I am really picky about how brisk and astringent I like my black teas, and not just because they tend to give me a belly ache, I find when they are really intense they are just too overbearing, much like some people find mint too much or flowery teas. I like my black teas (more traditional western style ones, not the delicate Chinese reds) to have just a little bite to them. The taste is both robust and sweet, blending creamy notes of cocoa (bordering between milk and dark) and peanut butter, with earthy notes of sweet potatoes and woody notes of oak. The finish is a delicate mix of cherries and orange zest with a citrus aftertaste that lingers. I feel this tea has the potential to be a really iconic morning tea, proving once again that the Satemwa Tea Estate has some mad skills.

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2015/06/what-cha-malawi-bvumbwe-handmade.html

Cwyn

Awesome, well written piece here!

masked185

Now I’m really curious what you’re going to be doing :D

Amanda 'SoggyEnderman' Wilson

Ok, I can give a little away, Ben, two of my friends, and myself are moving…but instead of across town like originally planned, possibly across country ;)

But it is not definite and there is so much planning to do

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

Got this as a 10g sample from What-Cha. This is the first pu’er I’ve ever tried that didn’t smell like tobacco and/or seaweed. It smells like wet grass. Just shy of 5g of tea, gongfu, 200 degrees, two short rinses. First steep 10 seconds. Deep amber liquor. Aroma is moving beyond wet grass into something else. Hay maybe. I taste grass, hay, kale, greens, and pepper. Well, at least I can now say I tried a pu’er that didn’t taste like cigars!

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

85

So I am brewing this tea in less than optimal conditions, at work, with hot water provided by my Keurig (192 degrees I think) and steeped grandpa for 3 minutes. The dry leaf smells of cocoa, which is quite pleasant. The liquor has a lovely amber color and the cocoa aroma is still there. After 3 minutes the flavor is weak, so I’m turning over my hourglass brewer for another 90 seconds. Much better. Very robust, sweet, smooth, chocolatey, and not a hint of bitterness. Lovely! Will have to try this gongfu style and see what the tea reveals.

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

85

2 tsp tea, 10 oz water, 200 degrees, 3 minutes. This is the first time I’ve ever tasted a darjeeling tea, and I am loving it. Sweet, not bitter, grapes (skins too), and red wine. Apparently it’s quite caffeinated, so I’ll be bouncing all over my house tonight and probably cursing myself as I lay in bed wide awake at midnight. I regret that I did this in the evening because I wonder what the second infusion will be like. I guess I’ll find out tomorrow as I think this tea will likely become part of my daily morning ritual for awhile.

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

85

Gongfu, 190, 4g tea, one rinse. 30 seconds. Dark brew, almost coffee-like. An aroma I cannot define. Oh wait, it’s honey I think. I do taste a little sweetness. I definitely taste the char. And the hint of cinnamon. Very robust. Peppery. I will have to try this grandpa style; it is probably quite strong that way. Second steep one minute. I can feel it in the back of my throat. I like this tea a lot.

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

90

a really pronounced cocoa taste leading into a bit of cinnamon, with a rich complexity, and a creamy texture. of course the tea had no astringency to speak of, along with a decent amount of sweetness. I hadn’t had much luck with rolled-ball style oolongs dark roasted oolongs as a favorite prior to this but I loved this tea.

Flavors: Cinnamon, Citrus Fruits, Cocoa, Wood

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

99

Today’s introductory paragraph shall be played by the ‘Hello my baby, hello my darlin’ hello my ragtime gallll’ Frog (or is it a Toad) from classic cartoons of yore. Basically as soon as you start paying attention to it, poof it is still, relaxed, and croaking contentedly. Basically I lack anything interesting to say and do not feel like complaining about my meds. So here, frog dance time!

It is time for my weekly coverage of a new tea from What-Cha, specifically Darjeeling Autumn Flush 2014 Gopaldhara Red Thunder Gold Black Tea, in honor of the steaming bowl of Jaipur Karhi I have sitting next to me, the most superior of canned curries, for those lazy days. This is a unique Darjeeling, not only is it plucked late in the year (hello Autumn Flush) it is grown at a high elevation, meaning it gets frosted over which causes the tea to wilt, starting the oxidation process while the leaves are still attached to the tea plant. This tea is only produced in limited quantities, this particular batch is more tippy than most, giving it more of that fuzzy gold that I adore. The aroma of these thunderous leaves (also apropos since we are under a perpetual flood and thunderstorm warning as of late) is soooo intense, would have knocked me off my feet I was not already sitting down. Very strong notes of roasted peanuts and acorn squash, then the intensity mellows out and notes of raisins, spicebush, black walnut shells, and lastly a delicate hint of sandalwood at the finish. This is a super aromatic tea, so be prepared!

Into ye old steeping apparatus the leaves go, and by steeping apparatus I mean lidless yixing teapot I use for later flush Darjeeling tea. Because why not? The aroma of the dark leaves is so sweet, strong notes of raisins and roasted peanuts with a distinctly floral and woody sandalwood finish. The liquid is heady without being floral (apparently that is a thing, or at least I perceive it so) strong sweet notes of yams, raisins, roasted peanuts and a finish of acorn squash. Yum.

Oh MAN this tea is freaking delicious! It is intensely rich and heavy, with a creamy mouth feel and a tiny hint of drying at the finish. The taste starts out as a not too sweet blend of loam, roasted peanuts, and squash, this transitions to a more sweet taste profile of squash blossoms (not something I run into often) raisins, and lily flowers. The finish is a malty blend of raisins and sandalwood, giving it a lingering aromatic aftertaste. Me thinks I am going to need this tea as a staple in my tea stash!

For blog and photos:
http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2015/06/what-cha-darjeeling-autumn-flush-2014.html

Marzipan

I think his name was officially something like Jefferson P Frog?

donkeytiara

Marzipan, you are correct!

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

40

My taste buds are spoiled when it comes to sencha and gyokuro… unfortunately this just isn’t that smooth and the astringent notes are very noticeable in this tea.

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

I am reviewing a new to me tea, two days in a row. Firing my specialist and going back to my primary care physician appears to have been a really smart move. But enough, on to the tea.

I read the other’s reviews. I normally don’t do that until after posting. When I opened the bag I caught roasted notes. When I brewed it, roasted. When I first sipped, yeah, roasted.

OK, teas with roasted notes are my least favorite types. I tend to avoid dark oolongs out of fear. So, I have noticed that even light roasting (like this tea) jumps out at me and it is all I taste. Reading what everyone else wrote was interesting to me as it is barely mentioned anywhere on the internet. I guess this is the point where I say, sparrow tongue, it isn’t you. It’s me. Then turn and slowly walk away. OR, I can put on the big boy pants and try again.

Ignoring that which shall not be mentioned, I taste the corn up front. Then I get a brief jolt from a metallic note that quickly glides into a grassy finish.

The second mug is completely different. Gone is that which shall not be mentioned. In its place is a seaweed component. Then the corn, followed once again by grassy. No bitterness. A little dryness.

While this is not going to make my personal favorites list, it is interesting and far more complex than the price would suggest.

Fjellrev

I really hope everything is ok with you and your doctor(s).

mrmopar

+1 on the Doctor.

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

85

Today was one of those adventure type days, the Trio (which is what I should totally start calling Ben, Fish, and myself) went to a bin store. If you are not in the know, Goodwill (and some other thrift stores) have an outlet store, where you pay for things by the pound (or really cheap per item) and all the things that do not sell in the store get sent there in big bins. I did most my shopping when I lived in Pennsylvania at one (lovingly called the 50 cent store, even though now they are 85 cents, but the name stuck) and you can spend a few hours sorting thoroughly through all the bins. Not the one we went to today, it was massive, plus they kept rotating bins, so I could never see it all. I got some awesome new clothes (still need more skirts and some silk PJs…mmm silk) a cat scratching post, Ben got new clothes, and an antique printing press drawer. I have wanted one for years, going to turn it into a table to show off my rocks!

I love What-Cha (I know, everyone knows that by now!) their teas have become favorites of mine, but really what makes me so hype about What-Cha is Alistair’s love of exposing tea drinker’s to uncommon tea regions! Today’s tea, Georgia Old Lady Black Tea, comes from one of those lesser known regions, the country of Georgia, handmade by Natela of Nagobilevi Village, yes this tea is all made by a little old lady in her home, which is kinda beautiful. The aroma of the large curly leaves is very sweet and surprisingly brisk! Blending orange marmalade, cocoa, a creamy sweetness and a delightful finish of yams.

Giving the leaves their much anticipated (by them or me, you be the judge) steeping in my much loved steeping apparatus, the aroma gets all up in your grill with the briskness! The wet leaves have strong notes of malt and brisk citrus and oak wood. There is a sweetness to it as well, like orange marmalade and a bit of yams at the finish. The liquid is creamy sweet blending cocoa and yam notes with a bit of malt and a sour yet sweet note of orange marmalade at the finish.

Ah, my mismatched tea gear kinda works, the saucer from my broken vintage cup, and the vintage cup with no saucer, they are now best friends. The taste starts out brisk, but not too much, just the right amount to wake up the mouth and invigorate the mind. There are notes of sweet cocoa and orange marmalade, it then moves on to yams and a touch of malt. This tea is not the most spectacular black tea I have ever sipped, it is certainly good, I enjoyed every drop, but it is not the most complex of cups. So, your mileage may vary, if you want a super complicated tea then this is probably not for you, but if you want a delicious tea that has a homey taste, then this one is perfect.

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2015/06/what-cha-georgia-old-lady-black-tea-tea.html

Maddy Barone

The first thing I ordered from What-Cha was the Georgia sampler, and this was one of the teas. Really nice! There wasn’t a single tea I didn’t like in that sampler.

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

93

Holy mackerel the weather today has been awesome! I am pretty sure it stormed (and not just distant rumbles, full on house rattling storms, there might have been hail!) from 9am till 3pm. I did not get the full effect of the storms though, see I got up at 9 to the massive crack of thunders (and a terrified Espeon nesting in my hair) and decided to lay in bed and enjoy the storm for a bit…next thing I know it is 3 in the afternoon and Ben tells me the storm just ended. Well crap. Trying to flip my schedule to diurnal so I can be aware at the Midwest Tea Fest this weekend is turning out to be hard!

Today we are looking at a tea from What-Cha, slowly trying to finish all the ones in my Monarch notebook (aka tea notebook four) really I should have made a separate What-Cha notebook so finding which ones to review would be easier, oops. I love Oolongs, I love Darjeelings, so yeah, combining the two for Darjeeling 2nd Flush 2014 Goomtee Oolong Tea just sounds awesome. When Darjeeling experiments with processing techniques to make something other than the typical Darj Black Tea, it usually turns out to be a unique and delicious result, I have loved the Yellow and White Darjeelings I have had, so let us see how the Oolong compares. The aroma of the dark curling leaves (almost looks like a Yancha had a party with a first flush Darjeeling and this is the result) is pretty delicious, it blends notes of fresh muscatel, like scuppernongs and purple grapes. Add on delicate floral notes and a tiny bit of nuttiness at the midsniff, and the finish, well, it fades off into walnuts and lychee.

So, how to brew this tea, the perpetual conundrum! What the heck, I will do both! Starting out with the gaiwan for gongfu cha, the aroma of the actually quite colorful leaves is graceful, no really, it smells like a graceful flower in the breeze next to a scuppernong orchard. Underneath the almost heady sweetness is a delicate note of chestnut and pepper. The liquid is super sweet, blending honey and muscatel notes with honeysuckles and a finish of walnuts.

The first steep is incredibly delicate while having a well rounded mouthfeel, smooth and sweet like flower nectar and biting into a sun warmed scuppernong. This transitions to lychees and chestnut, the finish has notes of fresh vegetation and a lingering orange blossom.

For the second steep, the aroma is a blend of honey, flower nectar, and a bit of golden raisins. The taste is a bit intoxicating, blending muscatel notes of scuppernongs and golden raisins at the front. This moves to a slightly heady blend of flower, like wildflowers and honeysuckles with just a touch of nasturtium bite. The finish has a touch of briskness and malt, similar to a 2nd flush Darjeeling.

For a western style steeping, well, I think I might actually like it better than with the gaiwan! The mouthfeel is buttery the whole time, moving into just a tiny bit of briskness at the finish. The taste starts out with honey and lychees, then moves into scuppernongs and honeysuckles, and has a finish of juicy tangerines. Another fine example of an experiment turning out successful!

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2015/06/what-cha-darjeeling-2nd-flush-2014.html

Cwyn

I really like Goomtee Darjeeling and I don’t even like Darjeeling most of the time.

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

93

The first thing I notice is the unique appearance of the dry leaves – they’re huge and multicolored. I see white, green, and various shades of brown. Beautiful!

Fortunately, the flavor is just as lovely as the appearance. This tea tastes like warm, honey-filled, baked grapes. Whatever mellows and sweetens this tea masks the sometimes sharp Darjeeling back note.

Flavors: Grapes, Honey

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 3 min, 0 sec 4 tsp 16 OZ / 473 ML

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

85

Life Jack: Buy a samovar and use it as a daily hot-water dispenser for when you’re drinking tea that you’re not picky about water over. Or at least that’s my life plan. I’ll let you know how practical that ends up actually being.

Aroma: Honey with a touch of something vegetal.

Bright, almost brisk but very smooth. Mellows into honey-like sweetness, maybe darker. Raisin? I usually just say drop fruit. Each sip starts brisk, bright, followed by drop fruits and honey.

I’ve been drinking this for a while, but haven’t really gotten around to a proper review. Out of the Russian teas in the sample set I got, this one is definitely my favourite. I plan to reorder if I can, although What-Cha didn’t have the Russian teas separate last I checked (understandable, since they’re probably a bitch to get… damnit Russia).

Also back to the Tea Books again; been reading an independent published university study from the 60s on Tea Production, so expect there’ll be a post up on teatra.de about that. …Eventually.

Preparation
Boiling 4 min, 0 sec

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

90

I have such a love-hate relationship with packing, I really do. There is a part of me that dreads it (mostly because it never fails that I pack a thing up and then an hour later realize I need said thing again) and a large part of me that loves it. It is my favorite part of moving, the nostalgic feeling towards the place you are living as it slowly reverts back to the form you first saw it in, a bare house/apartment/room. Plus you can find a lot of things you just don’t need anymore stuffed in storage, in the back of a closet, and so forth, it is freeing. This will be the fifteenth or sixteenth time I have moved in my (almost) thirty years of life, I look forward to the adventure!

Now that I have my Das Uber 80s Pop Pandora station blaring on my speakers, it is time to put aside the boxes and have a look at What-Cha’s Fujian Golden Buds Tan Yang Gongfu Black Tea! I am kicking myself for not covering this one earlier since it seems Alistair is out of stock on the larger size, I hope that more comes in because I am going to want more. I love What-Cha (like you all couldn’t tell by this point) but trying to decide which teas to get at what order is an intense process! This tea is named for its appearance (Golden Buds) where it was grown (Tanyang Village in Fujian, China) and the artistry which created it (Gongfu) and of course the kind of tea (Black Tea!) The aroma of these delicate needles is something else, intense notes of sweet potatoes and acorn squash. There are also notes of roasted peanuts and lesser notes of raisins with a pinch of smoke. Quite the delicious smelling tea, but I have a serious weakness for black teas with sweet potato and roasted peanut notes.

Into my sexy tall gaiwan the leaves go, I mostly got this tea-set with its tall lines because it works for steeping needly teas, would be an utter fail with oolongs! Brewing the leaves makes the tea area I was stationed at smell super rich and delicious, I could practically taste the tea in the air above the gaiwan, I consider that a good sign! There are notes of sweet potatoes and also delicate sweet notes of flowers and fruit, hard to distinguish which ones since it is pretty light, but it is certainly there. The liquid is some good old fashioned sweet taters cooked in a fire, you know, even though they are wrapped super tight with foil, you still get a hint of smoke. Add in a distant hint of sweet stone fruit and you have yourself a yummy smelling tea.

I took the photos and tasting notes for this tea when I was visiting my mom for Christmas, so she got to try it with me, and seeing the pair of cups in the photos makes me homesick. Luckily for the internet and texting I can talk to her while I am typing this up, yay for technology! The first steep is nice and mellow, with a very well rounded mouthfeel, not too thick, but certainly has a presence. The taste starts off with a hint of malt and a rich sweet potato note, it is yamtastic! Actually the taste is more like yams since it is on the sweet side. The taste moves right along to roasted peanuts and a delightful aftertaste of stewed dark cherries.

Oh man, the aroma this steep is intense! It starts with sweet potatoes and roasted peanuts, and then adds in some definite cherry notes and a cocoa rich finish. The mouthfeel is bright this steep, has a bit of a zinginess with a slightly drying, tingly finish. The taste starts out with the smoked yams, there is a definite smokiness, but it is more distant fire or things cooked on a fire rather than char or eating fire (like Lapsang Souchong can be) the finish is a blend of peanuts and cocoa, like a richer version of a peanut-butter cup.

Third steeping is like a flashback to the first, a gentle smoked sweet potato and definitely cherries with a hint of cocoa at the finish. The mouthfeel has gone back to being well rounded, no more drying, just smooth and slightly thick. The taste is sweet potatoes and cocoa, with a touch of smoke at the finish. This last steep was a little meh, but it was still tasty, just greatly overshadowed by the previous steep. I did a fourth steeping which was mild and sweet, by the fifth steeping I could tell it was done so I traveled no further. As per usual I (almost) never meet a Chinese Black/Red tea I did not enjoy, and this was no exception!

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2015/05/what-cha-fujian-golden-buds-tan-yang.html

Flavors: Cherry, Cocoa, Malt, Peanut, Smoke, Sweet Potatoes

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

79

This tea starts with the appearance of the irregular, obviously handmade cannon balls of tea. I couldn’t resist rolling each pellet around between my fingers before plopping it in the tea pot – it made me feel strangely connected to the people who crafted the tea.

The brewed tea is pleasantly astringent – but still somehow mellow and kind. I was attracted by the ‘cinnamon’ flavor in the description, but I don’t taste any hint of spice here. Mostly just an astringent start, with a vegetal, grassy aftertaste.

Flavors: Astringent, Grass, Vegetal

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 3 min, 15 sec 3 g 8 OZ / 236 ML

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

81

This Darjeeling tastes vaguely fruity without being specifically grape-y. I’m also getting a lot of wood flavor and a dryness after the sip. A strong sour flavor as I drain the cup makes me wonder if my Darjeeling ‘bolted’ (Bolted, defined by “The Tea Enthusiast’s Handbook”: a phenomenon… wherein the brisk flavor components suddenly overwhelm the body characteristics and the cup qualities become unpleasantly assertive).

However, since I’ve wanted my teas to do something as dramatic as ‘bolting’ for quite some time – I can’t be sure whether I actually experienced it, or just wanted to…

Flavors: Fruity, Wood

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 3 min, 0 sec 3 g 8 OZ / 236 ML

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

95

My body and I are not on speaking terms again, the jerk has decided to take a dive into the deep end if the fatigue pool. I feel like I am constantly walking through pudding, and the pudding is not translucent so everything feels foggy, the brain fog is real, yo. It has been this way off and on for a little over a month, instead of my usual ‘once a week I am really fatigued, usually from doing stuff’ it is the other way around, which is really lame! In a perfect world my next visit to the doctor will consist of blood work and I will need some vitamin or something, I will take a vitamin deficiency any day over having to be put on some new medication. My body and meds tend to have a VERY rocky relationship, and a lot of the drugs used to help Fibromyalgia are ones that have given me pretty severe reactions. Or maybe I just need to drink more tea, yeah, I like that solution the best!

It is now the most dangerous part of any Wednesday, going to What-Cha’s website to get the relevant info and linkage for the tea I am going to cover, because I always drift over to the new tea section and there always seems to be something new that I want, it never fails! Today’s tea is Korea Jeong Jae Yeun’s Hwangcha 2014 Balhyocha Tea, ok before I get too far, remember when I reviewed Korea Dong Cheon Daejak 2013 Sparrow’s Tongue ‘Jakseol’ Green Tea and talked about how it was an amazing tea that as soon as I could I ended up buying a bunch more…and how I was worried I would not do the tea justice? Yeah, well, it happened again, I am beginning to think that Korea might make my favorite teas, clearly I am going to need to test them ALL to be sure! It is good that I bought more of this tea (and not just because I have been on a binge since it arrived) because the notes I took for this one are almost illegible, especially the third steep where my words just kinda trail off the page, I consider that a good sign!! Ok, so this tea is the only tea created by hand by tea artist Jeong Jae Yeun, who (after a bit of digging around) is described as the epitome of grandma tea artisans, which is what I want to be when I grow up I think. Apparently her tea is rather popular with Korean monks, which is also pretty awesome! Ok, now to address the elephant in the teapot, what the heck is a Hwangcha and Balhyocha? To put it in the most simplest of terms, they are the same thing a tea that has gone through fermentation (translation only, really it is oxidation) and Hwangcha is not the same as Chinese yellow teas, Tony Gebely wrote a fantastic article on the tea as did Morning Crane Tea and Mattcha, the subject is really dense, one I could devote an entire blog post to! So, onto the leaves, the pretty curly dark leaves, they smell really good! Super creamy and sweet, with strong notes of honey, roasted peanuts, lychee, papaya, distant flowers, a touch of malt, spicebush…man, this tea has everything! It has one of the most complex aromas I have had the pleasure of sticking my nose in. I think I spent the entire time waiting for my kettle to warm up sniffing this tea, it felt like I was going down the rabbit hole and each new sniff revealed something new while not overpowering the previous notes.

Into the gaiwan the leaves go, and my little tea region has been turned into an aromatic fun zone, the notes that are drifting out of my gaiwan have me super excited to try this tea (ok I already was) the aroma of the wet leaves is intensely creamy, it reminds me of a decadent creamy sweet treat. The intense creaminess is accompanied by floral notes, papaya, and a rich cocoa and malt undertone. The liquid is unsurprisingly creamy sweet as well, with notes of papaya and a fruity musk that is not quite identifiable, it is something from a long distant memory. There is a finish of cocoa adding extra richness to an already rich aroma.

I am glad I do most of my tea tasting sitting down, because I would have been knocked off my feet by this one (intense tastes and smells make me go all fainting goat sometimes) the mouthfeel is so thick and creamy, it is both very heavy and bright. The taste hits my tongue in waves, first the intense creaminess combined with cocoa and distant flowers (a hint of rose I think?) this moves on to fruit, hello lychee and papaya! The finish is an explosion of sweet cream and malt, which lingers, oh how it lingers!

Second steep time! The aroma is sweet, nice notes of lychee, cocoa, sweet cream, and a tiny bit of spicebush at the finish. Yes, I did accidentally dip my nose in the tea while sniffing it, what of it? This taste is pretty similar to the first, it did not grow or change much, the mouthfeel is still super creamy and thick. The main difference between this steep and the first was an intense build of malt towards the finish that lingered, giving more of a boost at the finish.

Third steeping, this one is totally illegible in my notebook, so I had to imbibe more, not that I mind of course! The aroma this time is replaced with cocoa and cream, but instead of lychee there is a stronger papaya and spicebush. The taste is still riding that delightful sweet cream train, but it is a bit less of a cream explosion and more of a smooth creaminess. The midtaste is all fruit and cocoa, papaya and lychee being the dominant, but I am pretty sure I also detected a tiny bit of coconut as well, which is fascinating. The finish is malt and cocoa, the cocoa lingers for a while.

This tea does not evoke any strong emotional response, and it does not change a whole bunch between steepings, but it is delicious! I tried it western style as a comparison and it was intense, like the first steep but all the notes went all 90s and became eXtreme. In theory this tea should not be a favorite, since it does not evolve or elicit a strong emotional or nostalgic response, but I cannot help but love it, it just tastes THAT good.

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2015/05/what-cha-korea-jeong-jae-yeuns-hwangcha.html

Ubacat

Sounds wonderful! Love your review.

Cwyn

I have the 2013 of this and it is fantastic, I reviewed it on here. Previously only MorningCrane had it and one got it on a group order or you had to hope for any remains after the group order. I’m really glad to know What-Cha has it.

Amanda 'SoggyEnderman' Wilson

Thank you Ubacat!!

Cwyn I need to just spend an afternoon stalking your reviews, I am pretty sure I could find sooo many teas I would want by doing that ;)

Cwyn

I haven’t been on Steepster all that long, only a year so I don’t have as many as most people.

Amanda 'SoggyEnderman' Wilson

ahhh, that is going to make reading them easier. So often I go to my dashboard and get sad because I follow too many people, I never get caught up!!

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

100

The tea liquor smells of wet grains with subtle hints of honey and chocolate. It reminds me of the mash when brewing beer and it is comforting to me. The taste is warm, smooth and malty with a touch of sweetness. Later steepings bring out a buttery, rich flavor and floral hints.

Flavors: Butter, Chocolate, Grain, Honey, Malt

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 2 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 7 OZ / 204 ML

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

86

Though knowing of Darjeeling’s grape-y flavor profile theoretically, I didn’t expect my first sip into this cup to immediately bring up the word ‘grape juice’ in my mind. Further sips reveal a beautiful woody oakiness underneath the tart grape flavor.

I now see never having bothered with Darjeeling (after my first unsuccessful attempt with bagged Darjeeling) was a huge oversight in my tea existence. I can’t wait to get to know this tea better through the five different estate samples from What-Cha.

Flavors: Grapes, Muscatel, Oak wood, Wood

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 3 min, 30 sec 6 g 16 OZ / 473 ML

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

70

1st infusion (1 min) Aroma is dark roasted chocolate. Tastes metallic and earthy. Slight astringency in the back of the throat.
2nd infusion (2 min) Aroma has hints of chocolate. Tastes earthy and woodsy. More astringent taking over.
3rd infusion (3 min) Aroma is vegetal. More roasted flavor and I can pick up hints of chocolate. Astringency takes over my whole mouth after each sip.

What a weirdly complex tea! I’m not sure if I would get it again, it is very pricey for something I’m not in love with, but I enjoyed the experience!

Flavors: Dark Chocolate, Metallic, Vegetal, Wet Earth, Wood

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 1 min, 0 sec 2 tsp 7 OZ / 204 ML

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .

89

I once knew a person from Burma – we learned German together. Though I can’t remember her first name, I remember that her last name was Laden (she had a hard time traveling internationally). I keep hoping that the flavor of this tea will remind me more about her, or what she told me about Myanmar – but I haven’t had much luck so far.

This tea is one that defies expectations. I expected the dry tea to be dusty and feathery like a bagged tea, but instead found beautiful, tiny tea pellets that reminded me of miniature gunpowder tea. Then, I assumed the brewed liquor would be a dark brown or black, but was surprised by its rich, ruby red. On my first sip, I thought that I had at least predicted the flavor accurately, since I tasted the satisfying bitterness of a Twinings bagged tea, but the further into the cup I drank, the more I tasted an unexpected, fruity complexity.

All in all, this tea has definitely made me curious about the rest of my recently arrived What-Cha order – mostly consisting of a Burma, Nepal, and Darjeeling “Discovery Collection”.

Flavors: Fruity

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 2 min, 0 sec 2 tsp 16 OZ / 473 ML

Add a Comment

Please keep things friendly and .