62

Hmmm, looks like I’m going to be the lone dissenter on this one so far. So I’ve never actually had the base Yu Lu Yan Cha, and I believe that is wholly the reason for my lack of enthusiasm about this blend.

I brewed as instructed, knowing that I would probably want to add milk and honey, but I took a sip first. People say the base tea shines in this one, and I would have to concur. The spices were mild but nicely balanced, with no one spice coming over the top. I could smell the fennel (bleh) in the dry blend but it doesn’t stick out in the brewed tea.

However, the main flavor in this was the black tea. I did taste the chocolate notes, but there was a bitter harsh note that was almost like smoke but not quite. I thought maybe I was losing my mind (based on descriptions by others) until I read Terri’s note about how she gets a burnt note from it when western brewed, which is obviously how this blend was prepared. Yeah, that’s it… like something that has been burnt, but not the smoke itself. Which is definitely a major turn-off for me. Perhaps I should only brew Yu Lu Yan Cha gongfu, as Terri does.

So anyway I added milk and honey. At first I was still unsure whether I wanted to drink it but the milk smoothed over the burnt note and the honey brought out the chocolate. I will likely be able to drik the rest of this one, although it may go into a swap box for someone who loves it more.

Preparation
Boiling 2 min, 0 sec
Bonnie

I love this..and Yu Lu Yan never tastes burnt to me. This blend does have pepper though. Maybe that’s what you taste as burnt. The base is potato cocoa (not sweet potato). I’ve shared it with a dozen tea people at once who all thought it was french fries dipped in a chocolate milk shake flavor. Weird how our taste buds can single out an ingredient and find it to be burned. Interestingly so.

Dinosara

Yes, taste buds are funny things! Although I’m not the only one to taste a smoky-burnt taste in Yu Lu Yan Cha, I definitely can’t rule out one of the spices to be the culprit here.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

Comments

Bonnie

I love this..and Yu Lu Yan never tastes burnt to me. This blend does have pepper though. Maybe that’s what you taste as burnt. The base is potato cocoa (not sweet potato). I’ve shared it with a dozen tea people at once who all thought it was french fries dipped in a chocolate milk shake flavor. Weird how our taste buds can single out an ingredient and find it to be burned. Interestingly so.

Dinosara

Yes, taste buds are funny things! Although I’m not the only one to taste a smoky-burnt taste in Yu Lu Yan Cha, I definitely can’t rule out one of the spices to be the culprit here.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

Profile

Bio

I am tea obsessed, with the stash to match. I tend to really enjoy green oolongs, Chinese blacks, and flavored teas with high quality bases, especially florals, bergamot-based teas, and chocolate teas.

In my free time I am a birder, baker, and music/movie/tv addict.

Here are my rating categories, FYI:
100-90: Mind-blowingly good, just right for my palate, and teas that just take me to a happy place.
89-85: I really really like these teas and will keep most of them in the permanent collection, but they’re not quite as spectacular as the top category
84-80: Pretty tasty teas that I enjoy well enough, but definitely won’t rebuy when I run out.
79-70: Teas that I would probably drink again, but only if there were no preferrable options.
69-50: Teas that I don’t really enjoy all that much and wouldn’t drink another cup of.
49 and below: Mega yuck. This tea is just disgusting to me.
Unrated: Usually I feel unqualified to rate these teas because they are types of teas that I tend to not like in general. Sometimes user error or tea brewed under poor conditions.

Location

Ohio, US

Following These People