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English Vs. Irish Breakfast

18 Replies

I enjoy Irish Breakfast AND English Breakfast, but at different times of day. Irish gets my vote at actual breakfast time; I love a strong but comfortingly malty Assam when I wake up. English suits me for afternoon tea, when a good Keemun hits the spot.

And Scottish Breakfast, with its touch of peaty Yunnan, is great any time I want a stout and warming tea.

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Jude said

After reading this discussion I was inspired to buy some Irish Breakfast to try it and liked it a lot. I like English Breakfast, too, but it can be a bit perfumey, which this Irish wasn’t.

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Guy said

The way I’ve described the two to people that seems to resonate with them is that Irish Breakfast is like Coca Cola whereas English Breakfast akin to Pepsi Cola.

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tbag69 said

irish breakfast is more robust and full bodied than english breakfast,and personally i find its better,especially with milk and honey

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Irish is definitely the stronger, maltier one. I much prefer it to the English’s astringency. Irish I REALLY like double-strong, iced, with milk on a sunny day!

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Epi Tea said

Here’s a history blurb as to why a difference between English and Irish teas even exists.

The story of English Breakfast and irish Breakfast teas is an interesting one. Ireland and England had very much the same flavor profile up until world war two. By profile I mean the way the way the teas are blended in their culture, English Tea and irish tea was very much the same.

When WWII broke out Ireland of course did not enter the war and as a result, was not allowed access to British ports. This of course meant that the irish no-longer had access to their only source of tea, England. So it would be at this time that ireland would seek out new sources of tea from the east. They looked to East Africa and india and over a few short years the Irish had a flavor profile of their own. It consisted more of black teas from East Africa than the British profile did.

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