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Cooking w/ Tea

175 Replies
Janefan said

Bigelow teas has a recipe database too: http://www.bigelowtea.com/recipes.aspx

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Janefan said

this looks so simple and yummy, I may make them this weekend. I think adding some chopped crystallized ginger may to nice to add some crunch and zip!

Matcha muffins:
http://www.steepedteablog.com/2010/01/more-about-matcha.html

Cofftea said

Oooh… If you like orange muffins I bet 52teas’ Mandarin Matcha would be really good in these:)

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Janni select said

One of my favourite sites in general has a couple really good tea recipes. If you haven’t checked out Just Bento (or its sister site, Just Hungry), you should give it a whirl. :D

Earl Grey Tea Muffins: http://justbento.com/handbook/johbisai/earl-grey-tea-muffins

Lazy Easy Tea Eggs: http://justbento.com/handbook/johbisai/lazy-easy-tea-eggs

Homemade Green Tea Furikake: http://www.justbento.com/handbook/johbisai/homemade-furikake-no-9-green-tea

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Cofftea said

From www.matchasource.com

Yield: One 9-inch round cake, to serve 6

3 ounces (3/4 cup) cake flour
1 t. Matcha tea (ingredient grade)
6 ounces (4) whole large eggs, at room temperature
3 ounces (scant ½ cup) granulated sugar

Powdered sugar for dusting the top of the cake before serving, if desired
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Sift the cake flour with the tea three times. Using aerosolized pan spray, coat the bottom of a 9-inch round cake pan lightly. Place a round of parchment paper on the bottom of the pan and spray the parchment lightly. Set the pan aside.

Place the eggs and sugar into a heatproof bowl. Place the bowl over a pot of simmering water (the bottom of the bowl should be above the level of the water). Whisking constantly, heat until the eggs and sugar feel warm to the touch (approximately 100-110 degrees F.). Then pour the mixture into the bowl of an electric mixer, outfitted with a whisk attachment, and beat until light in color and texture, approximately tripled in volume. Then, gently but thoroughly, fold the dry ingredients into the egg foam without deflating, making sure that there is no undissolved flour lurking at the bottom of the mixing bowl. Immediately scoop the mixture into the prepared cake pan and bake for approximately 25 minutes, or until the cake tests done when a skewer is inserted into the center. Cool on a rack. Dust with sifted powdered sugar just before serving, if desired.

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TeaParT said

We got to try these at one of the tea parties but I haven’t actually bake them myself. I doubt mine would come out so pretty but the leaf shape didn’t look too difficult.

Matcha Shortbread Cookies
http://theterraceavenueinn.com/wordpress/?p=82

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kaiz said

I often use Earl Grey tea as the base for marinades. It also makes excellent tea liquer, as do rooibos teas!

Janefan said

Neat – I’ll have to try those. Most recipes seems to use the smoky Lapsang Souchong, or green tea for asian recipes.

kaiz said

Lapsang Souchong is great for marinades, but it is expensive, and I am cheap! :-) With the Earl Grey, you can simply use bagged teas from the supermarket. (There is a Earl Grey prune bread recipe that is pretty fantastic. I’ll see if I can find the recipe for it an post it.) I haven’t tried LS to make a liquer, although I suspect that it would turn out well. I suspect that any strongly flavored tea would work well as a liquer.

Janefan said

I got some LS at a tasting/swap. I can’t stand to drink it because of the “campfire” taste, but I am keeping it on hand for cooking only!

If you do some search comparison actually, you’ll find you can purchase some very good Lapsangs for cheap! Grind it up in a mortar and pestel and voila, salmon rub!

Janefan said

My Lapsand Souchong is from Harney & Sons. Don’t know how much it costs, but it is also good as a rub or marinade on chicken. Or you can grind the leaves and mix with cream cheese and a few other ingredients for a great spread/dip. Here’s the recipe: http://www.teachef.com/view_recipe.html?recipe=83

As a kind of side note (not pertaining to marinades) we actually worked with a dairy farm to create some tea cheeses, and I have to say… The Lapsang Cheese is amazing! The farm uses a fresh cows milk cheese, and the tea has an amazingly creamy texture with just the right amount of smokiness to be able to compare it to a smoked gouda. The cheese is amazing on a grilled cheese or just even in a cheese platter. We’ve also experimented with Raspberry tea cheese (great melted on toast with a bit of jam) as well as Puttabong, Hot Cinnamon Spice, Fenghuang Shuixian and Lavender!

Cofftea said

Where can I get these cheeses? A tea pepper jack (or any tea cheese w/ red pepper) would be GREAT!

The cheese’s I believe you’d have to order from us at the shop, the only ones we have in stock at the moment are the Lapsang and the Raspberry. It’s $15 I believe. We also worked with a creamery in Massachusetts making ice creams which I believe you can find on our website: 3 flavors (Matcha, Earl Grey Supreme & Chai).

Cofftea said

MATCHA! hehe

I’m obsessed, can you tell? ;-)

Cofftea said

I can say the same thing! Not sure about a chai spice (cinnamon) one though. I’d personally like to see the spice come from peppers. I could totally see a tea and pepper cheese or matcha mac and cheese!

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Janefan said

Here are 3 that caught my eye this week:

TEAramisu (uses powdered chai mix, but I think reg chai brewed strong would be a closer equivalent to espresso): http://blog.englishteastore.com/blog/tea-recipes/tea-recipe-tea-ramisu/

Tea Verrines with Citrus Fruits: http://serendipity-kate.blogspot.com/2010/01/tea-verrines-with-citrus-fruits.html I really want to make a tea jelly soon! This one uses Rooibos earl grey (maybe hard to find) but I’ve seen a similar recipe w/ reg Earl Grey.)

Honey Chamomile Frozen Custard: http://spaininiowa.blogspot.com/2010/01/honey-chamomile-frozen-custard.html I know chamomile isn’t real tea, but I think this recipe would probably be a good basis for other teas, possibly tweaking the amt of honey?

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Cofftea said

Has anyone ever made matcha pasta?

Janefan said

oh wow, matcha soba noodles would be awesome! I’ve never even made plain pasta from scratch though.

Cofftea said

I don’t like soba noodles, so I was thinking plain pasta, but a recipe for either would be amazing!

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MKstuder said

I have been working with Karen Harbour of The Tea Spot. Karen is known as The Tea Spot Chef. Each week she contributes a recipe with tea as an ingredient to my site, Tea Examiner. http://www.examiner.com/x-12909-Tea-Examiner. I have a category for her recipes, but somehow it isn’t showing in my topic list. All you have to do, though, is type Tea Spot Chef in the search engine box at the top right part of the page and the search results will give you the link to her recipes. There are also my own recipes for food to go with tea or for tea parties. They don’t have tea in them.
When I publish my recipe for greens simmered in Lapsang souchong, I will post the link here.

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Cofftea said

Dr. Tea’s tea rubs are amazing! (but throw them into a spice mill before applying them.) I had their chicken one on a chicken breast tonite.

TeaParT said

Ming Tsai uses tea rubs on his Simply Ming show sometimes. Available online at:

http://www.mingspantry.com/tearubs.html

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