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Wonks said

Tetsubin destruction...

I’m wanting to remove the enamel from a pseudo tetsubin so it won’t flake off into my yumminess. I’m thinking about boiling it for a super long time. Any other suggstions? I’m not even sure why they enamel these things… >.<

6 Replies

Isn’t it a legal requirement to sell them in the West? No suggestions, but I’m curious to see the responses.

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Wonks said

I would like to add- if the enamel wasny so flakey, I wouldn’t mind it at all…. but I haven’t seen one that wasn’t. But your comment Daniel, has me concerned. I can’t help but.wonder if the cast iron could be made with non food grade metals (lead?) And still acceptable for sale because of the enamel food grade lining. I’m thinking that is doubtful, but someone that knows about cast iron should chime in with their thoughts on that.

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Tetsubin can rust easily, so you should always dry it thoroughly after use. If you allow the tetsubin to boil dry, especially in a stovetop, the enamel will be ruined. Is this what happened to you?

Wonks said

No, a kettle should only be used to boil water. Enameled teapots are terrible and always fail within a few weeks. I would love to have a rusty pot for the added properties and that’s why I was trying to conjure up something to strip enamel out of the interior.

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chadao said

I’m wondering if nail polish remover would work?

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Azzrian said

What about instead of using a solvent trying a tool like a dremmel instead to strip it off? Just a thought although it may be a stupid one lol

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