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Cofftea said

You put WHAT in your tea???

In Tibet, Mongolia, parts of northern India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, and mountainous areas in central Asia they are known to put butter and salt in their tea. What are your thoughts on this?

46 Replies
Carolyn said

It sounds interesting to me. I would think it would work well with a lapsang souchong.

Cofftea said

I suppose the salt would make it taste like salt cured bacon…

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Marie said

What kind of tea do they drink though? I think it would depend on type used. Never thought of drinking a savory tea before, only sweet or neutral.

Cofftea said

Savory teas are AMAZING! Check out Adagio’s. And theteafarm.com has a vinegar black.

Marie said

It will take a while for the savory tea “sell” to sink in. But I’m open to new experiences. I’ll check out the Adagio. Thx for the tip!

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I think they tend to drink harsh (and probably cheap) black teas. I’ve read a little about it, and I’m really interested in trying that someday. Sounds really unhealthy, but I’m an American – what can’t my stomach handle by this point?

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Auggy said

I think it is tea boiled insanely long times and uses yak butter. I read something about it a loooong time ago in some book on the Dalai Lama I think? It sounded very non-tea like. I can’t imagine yak butter being all that delightful.

Marie said

Wasn’t it for something like keeping them warm in incredibly icey temperatures? Something about the butter tea combination to help their bodies to retain heat? I could be totally off, but I remember something like that about the Mongolians.

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Carolyn said

I’ve been reading a great deal lately about the Silk Road and tea history and my understanding is that the tea the Tibetans are drinking is a kind of pu-erh. Or at least it was traditionally. My understanding is that part of the reason pu-erh teas were developed was to make trade into Tibet, Afghanistan, and similar regions possible.

Which makes me wonder, how would pu-erh tea taste prepared with butter and salt?

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Oddly enough, I’ve tasted Pu-erh with salt. And sugar. It wasn’t a cultural thing, I just had a bunch of people over and they wanted tea, so I made Pu-erh. While one guy was going to the bathroom, people shoveled a bunch of salt into his cup (along with the sugar he had already added.) Don’t remember exactly how it tasted, but I remember it being not terrible.

Cofftea said

shutter… cringe lol but then again in my opinion there’s nothing worse than a pu erh so it’d probably be an improvement. I hope to one day enjoy pu erh.

I admit, it’s a weird taste to get used to. But when you start drinking the really good stuff, the well-aged cakes, it’s astoundingly good.

Cofftea said

Taste? Heck I can’t get it past my nose! lol

hahahaha I can see that.
The only thing that kept me drinking Pu-Erh was my interest in peculiar tasting things, and my knowledge that the tea had to be so revered for SOME reason.

Auggy said

Okay, I won’t be adding yak butter, but I might sprinkle a little salt in my fish pu-ehr next time I try it.

C’mon guys, Yak butter is DELICIOUS!
I keep a yak in my backyard just so I can harvest its dairy products!
Yak butter,
Yak Cheese,
Yak cream,
Yak milk,
Yak SOYmilk,
I can’t believe it’s not Yak butter,
The possibilities are endless!

takgoti said

@Auggy Fish pu-erh? I can say with some authority that is one thing I would not drink.

@JMKauftheil It looks like you are either writing a Dr. Seuss book or rap song. I shall call you Vanilla Yak.

Carolyn said

Put me down for the soy yak milk and the I Can’t Believe It’s Not Yak Butter. Vegan food is getting so much more sophisticated! :)

Auggy said

@takgoti: Yes, it was fishy. ROT’s Imperial Republic Pu-ehr. Smooth and sweet and had a lovely red color when being poured (totally get why the Chinese call it red tea if they are drinking stuff like this) but it tasted like a sweet glazed fish. I wasn’t able to rate it because objectively? Really quality tasting. But the taste was of FISH. (Want some in your tea box? I get it at the bulk section of the grocery store so can pick a little up for you if you are at all interested).

takgoti said

@Auggy I’ll tell you a secret. I don’t eat seafood. I the black fish of the Asian community.

teaplz said

These really, really weird pu-erh discussions have me never wanting to try this foul brew. Not only do I have to worry about body parts and bird poo-poo in the cake, but it smells like rotting carcasses and tastes fishy.

… :(

Auggy said

@takgoti: So I’m guessing fish tea would be REALLY not a good flavor for you then. Hehe.

@teaplz: Well, the loose stuff eliminates the bird and human bits in it but it’s definitely an interesting experience… really smooth with a complex flavor though, so that’s good. But yeah. Fish. (Or dirt… Or decaying leaves… Or hay…)

takgoti said

HAHAHAHAHA. Oh, we’ve really scared you now. I actually like pu-erh quite a bit. It is definitely an acquired taste, though. I’ve never had a cake before; it’s all been loose.

The majority of what I’ve had has a very earthy taste to it and I’d say that’s the defining feature above all else. I’ve never tried some of the crazy aged stuff before. Even with my current level of pu-erh appreciation I’ll admit I’m a little scared.

One of the best things about pu-erh is that on some days I can get a really good tea high going. Also, you can get a LOT of steeps out of it. It’s one of my favorite lounging around teas. I only like to drink it when I know I’ve got time to enjoy it.

Auggy said

I’m with you on the multi-steep thing. I was on steep 4 before it showed any hint of not being a first steep. The flavor profile changed but the overall taste was just as strong.

Cofftea said

@Auggy, I can get 6-10 infusions from a lot of green, white, and oolong teas. I don’t care for blacks as a 1st infusion so I tend to not resteep them as much, although I’m sure a black tea lover could get the same results, because they get diluted tasting quick. A sign of a good tea for me is resteeping it so much you get sick of it:)

Who’da thunk we could YAK on so much about this!
(Zing me, tak)

takgoti said

ZING!

Well played.

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kat said

wow yak is so new to me..Ive never heard of it before and I’m definitely intrigued about the butter and salt..love to try new things! I already use soy milk sometimes and splenda ALL the time – LOVE it.

Auggy said

Yaks are the long haired cow-like things in Central Asia. Sorta like funny looking bison.
http://images.google.com/images?q=yak&sourceid=navclient-ff&rlz=1B3GGGL_enUS265US265&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&hl=en&tab=wi

kat said

ohhhhh thats what those are. Thanks! I like the slack yak.

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I remember seeing a documentary or something about the Himalayas and they mentioned this. If I remember correctly it was originally practised for mineral/calorie intake.

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khsheehan said

Actually I’ve been looking for a buttery tea. I remember drinking a tea at a tea house once that was so buttery and sweet. It had that somewhat salty sweet flavor of cookie-dough. I have no idea what it was and it isn’t for sale online, but does anyone know of something similar to that? It wasn’t very chocolaty like cookie-dough, but the actual dough part really stood out. Thanks!

Cofftea said

Snow bud would be a great one for you to try. Check out my tasting note.

takgoti said

Oolongs can take on very buttery components for me. Also, some black teas I’ve had take on a very malty, yeasty character that reminds me of bread dough sometimes. Sometimes flavored teas [I’m going to go out on a branch and say mainly blacks] are supposed to have cookie-tasting aspects to their flavors.

Not sure if any of those are approaching what you’re getting at, but that’s all I’ve got.

khsheehan said

@takgoti Yeah I do like Oolongs a lot but it’s not the same buttery flavor I’m talking about. @Cofftea I’ll try that Snow Bud, thanks!

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depends on the kind of tea…just tried coconut butter in my chai tonight…was fantastic!

Lazey said

That sounds delicious. I’ve been wanting to get some coconut milk to go with my coconut chai, coconut butter sounds even better.

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