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"Daughter of Time" Book and Tea Club

30 Replies

I received my book this morning and plan on starting it tomorrow. I’m going to the seaside for the bank holidays and this would be great to read in the car. :)

Like I mentioned before I am a very slow reader so it may take me a few weeks to read it. Still up for a swap anywhere or tea drink pact as mentioned above in my previous post.

teapot1 said

Hey Kittylovestea…sounds like a nice plan for this holiday weekend. I should have my book today or tuesday, and I’m looking forward to getting started. I would love to swap, but I think you are INTL and that’s not in my budget just now. Maybe later:). By the way, I’m not a fast reader either. I too will reread pages or chapters sometimes…I think we will have plenty of time to finish up! Enjoy…

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CK select said

School has ended, office all cleaned and I don’t have to work with kiddies anymore… I’ll have free time to read! I’m in :)

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Josie Jade said

Hello, book club friends! If you’re interested in swapping for this book club, put your name below and where you’re willing to ship to (international or not). I will pair everyone up and message each person with details. I know the summer is busy for everyone, so that way whoever has time to swap can.

Those who don’t swap can still choose a tea that they enjoyed with the book or that reminded them of the book and share that when we begin to discuss!

Hope everyone is enjoying their reading! :)

Chelle said

Count me in. Willing to swap international if needed.

Josie Jade said

Great, Chelle! Anyone else?

(Let’s give it until Saturday to see who else signs up and then I’ll pair everyone up). :)

CK select said

Sorry for the late response – If I’m in time, I’ll swap and I haven’t sent tea internationally yet before but would do it.

I’m in! And wherever is fine!

Josie Jade said

Ok, so there’s Chelle, CK and BrewTEAlly Sweet for the swap. I’ll throw in myself to even it out. Even please follow me so I can message you details! :)

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Serenity said

Read it and looking forward to discussing it!

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Serenity said

Oh my gosh, the 28th came and went so quickly! This month has been crazy! So, this coming week maybe we’ll get a chance to talk Tey and tea. I’ll make sure to check back in a few days or so.
I’ll just start with saying that I really enjoyed the book, I thought it was well written and interesting. I loved all the history and the challenging the status quo of what had been accepted as fact. I don’t want to reveal too much in case people have not gotten around to reading it. I thought it was a creative idea to have someone confined to a bed, recovering, and trying to solve an old crime. It reminded me just a little, now that I think of it in retrospect, of Rear Window, in which a crime is solved in part by someone who uses a wheelchair and is confined to his apartment.
The historical plot made me wonder what else I accept as fact in history may be accepted as such but not truly accurate, or at least not proven to be true.
Ok, so, like many of you, there’s nothing I enjoy more when I’ve got a new book to read than if I have a steaming pot of tea right by my side. I wanted to go all UK pairing teas with this book, since it was so utterly British. I drank:
English Breakfast by Teavana: straightforward, tasty black tea.
Irish Breakfast by Peet’s Coffee and Tea: robust, sweet, malty: love it.
The London Cuppa: I had some tea bags of this tea, so it was a good choice for when I was in a rush, grabbing my book and travel mug along with other things on my way out the door.
I hope you are all having a really happy summer so far. My husband and daughter have the summer off, so I’ve been busy with them, but my job does not stop, so I’m also squeezing work into time with them. No wonder the beautiful days of summer fly by so swiftly!

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Serenity said

(((((spoiler alert: this discussion guide for Josephine Tey’s The Daughter of Time contain references to the plot, so if you have not read the book you may wish to skip this!)))

If anyone would like to discuss the book here are some suggested topics:

From bookrags.com

The Daughter of Time Topics for Discussion

Discuss the relevance of Marta’s profession as an actress to the story. What is it about her that attracts her to Grant, and vice versa?

Brent Carradine initially seems like a spoiled American boy trying to trick his father because he does not want to be part of the family furniture business. In what ways, if any, does he change after meeting Alan Grant?

What are the two most convincing reasons for Grant’s and Carradine’s conclusion that Richard III was not responsible for the murder of his nephews?

Does Alan Grant have a different outlook when he finishes this investigation project, or is it simply business as usual for him?

Describe the reasons for Atlanta Shergood’s hatred of Alan Grant.

Why does Tey have Alan Grant incapacitated for this entire story?

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Chelle said

I’ll go with: why was Alan Grant incapacitated during the entire story?
For one, Alan is portrayed as being extremely brilliant, sort of a brain over brawn impression to me. Also, I believe Tey to be pretty passionate on the subject and having Alan look into a real historical mystery with no witnesses to interrogate makes it more interesting to have a single setting with really getting to know only a handful of fictional characters so a good amount of focus can remain about the historical events surrounding Richard III.

Serenity said

Alan Grant had injuries from solving a case; he fell and injured his leg especially: am I remembering this correctly? Unfortunately, I had to return the book to the library, so I can’t refresh my memory.
In terms of Tey’s choice to have Grant confined to his hospital bed during the novel, I believe this was so that she could approach solving a mystery from a creative angle. Grant is horribly bored, he needs to be engaged and working, his mind is so restless. His curiosity gets caught on the historical mystery, and he attempts to solve it without a time travel machine.

CK select said

Yes, I think it was a good choice for the author to make, since Grant’s being confined made it so that he had to depend on other characters for part of his sleuthing and draws them (and us) into the search more.

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CK select said

Reading this made me interested to know if anyone knows any other histories that are widely known but not actually true, like the tonypandy that Alan and Brent talk about?

Serenity said

I was wondering the same thing!

Serenity said

I have not checked the validity of any of these, but worth checking out if interested:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_common_misconceptions

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Serenity said

Brent Carradine initially seems like a spoiled American boy trying to trick his father because he does not want to be part of the family furniture business. In what ways, if any, does he change after meeting Alan Grant?
Ok, I’ll tackle this one: I thought Brent was adorable, and at first he seemed kind of aimless. Working with Alan seemed to give him a purpose, and helped him see that life could be filled with meaningful occupation. He seemed a lot more mature at the end.

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