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What a beautiful tea this Dragonwell Style Laoshan Green! The dry leaves look identical to the very high quality dragonwell (or longjing 龍井茶) teas that I have had the pleasure of drinking. Flat, pan fired and distinctly complete — not broken or crumbled. Truly worthy of pondering the long journey these leaves have made to make it into my cup.

The aroma is the first surprise. Not nutty like the longjing, but that distinct smell of the other Laoshan greens, combining the butter bean aroma with the slight scent of the ocean mists. When described as being somewhat like a Japanese gyokuro, I had my doubts, since gyokuro teas are not only shaded before harvest, but also come from different varieties of cultivars. I should have known better, since David has such a wonderfully developed palate and honesty which I have never seen hyped. You see, I love gyokuro, but my budget leaves it to being enjoyed on only the rarest of occasions!

So I brewed this at a lower temperature (140F/60C) and for just 90 seconds, and what a wonderful complex flavor from this perfectly translucent light green infusion. Sweetness, light grassy flavor and a touch of umami, a surprisingly complex green that is hard to categorize, yet truly enjoyable. It shares the characters of several well known tastes (gyokuro, longjing and Laoshan green) and comes up with a whole new flavor/aroma profile. Second infusion, was slightly higher temp, and only for 45 seconds, yielding a new profile that is even sweeter and lighter. More infusions coming, but I could not resist writing this tea experience up and sharing on Steepster…

Preparation
140 °F / 60 °C 1 min, 30 sec
Spoonvonstup

Isn’t it incredible to see how much final processing can change the flavor of a tea? All of these Laoshan green teas from the same farm, same family.. very cool!

David Duckler

Many thanks for this,
Your comment has made my day. On a day so full of the headaches involved in getting teas from such small farms over to the USA, it raises my spirits to read your note, and enjoy the tea from your perspective. The He family in Laoshan amazes me with everything they grow. Such variety and such complexity that they offer.

Best Wishes,
David

Doug F

Twist my arm. I guess I’ll need to sample a few of this family’s offerings.

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Comments

Spoonvonstup

Isn’t it incredible to see how much final processing can change the flavor of a tea? All of these Laoshan green teas from the same farm, same family.. very cool!

David Duckler

Many thanks for this,
Your comment has made my day. On a day so full of the headaches involved in getting teas from such small farms over to the USA, it raises my spirits to read your note, and enjoy the tea from your perspective. The He family in Laoshan amazes me with everything they grow. Such variety and such complexity that they offer.

Best Wishes,
David

Doug F

Twist my arm. I guess I’ll need to sample a few of this family’s offerings.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

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Bio

I have been drinking tea for most of my life, and enjoy learning about Tea Culture from all around the world. I learned early about Russian and British traditions first, since my parents came from Europe, followed by the teas and culture of Ceylon/Sri Lanka and India. Since I have been a practicing Buddhist for the better part of 25 years, I have strong ties to Asia, and have slowly been learning about the teas from each part of the world I encounter. It is a wonderful and interesting journey.

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Raleigh, North Carolina, United States

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