97

After having this gaiwanish style yesterday I brewed it up western style today thanks to a comment from Bonnie. Which means I should also cold brew this up later as well. Anyway, western style 2 tsp per 8 oz, 205F at 2 minutes steeping time. This tea tastes relatively the same yet not quite. It’s still wonderfully delicious but it lacks the minute nuances that I had tasted from yesterday.

The floral notes seem stronger in the first few steepings than yesterday. The floral notes yesterday I could taste both the rose and the jasmine, today I can taste the rose but not jasmine. The sparkling qualities are barely discernible in the sip and I didn’t feel it on my tongue, just the taste. The creaminess isn’t quite as nice and smooth, it was there but kind of bland and the nice texture was missing as well. The cedar and pine notes aren’t nearly as strong as they were yesterday either, they were definitely in the background compared to sharing the spotlight yesterday.

I couldn’t really pinpoint any flavors or textures. The aftertaste was practically absent. The texture and feelings on the tongue and mouthfeel were MIA. It’s like the flavors are still there but muddled together and blanched.

While this is ok brewed western style, it just seems like an ordinary floral tea. It is definitely lackluster compared to yesterdays tasting when I steeped it gaiwanish style, so gaiwanish style I shall keep brewing this.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 2 min, 0 sec
CHAroma

Wow, I didn’t realize gaiwan style brewing could have such a different effect on the tea than western style. Maybe I should invest in a gaiwan…

Invader Zim

Honestly I wasn’t expecting a big difference either, it was hard to imagine that it was the exact same tea I had drank yesterday, more like a dumbed-down version and you don’t necessarily need a gaiwan. I wrote in the previous post how I do gaiwan style if you’re interested.

Azzrian

I wish I better understood how the gaiwan or gaiwan style makes a difference. The method that is. I need to wake up more and think this through.

Invader Zim

My best guess is that the brief steep times used gaiwan style keep the tea from basically stewing.

Bonnie

Also the water contact with the leaves and flowers, herbs etc. would be different. Some brew baskets are pretty constricting especially the mesh type. Good to test out methods! Bravo for that journey!

Ian

Usually in a gawain there is a higher leaf-to-water ratio and you use short steep times, which allows for different flavor profiles to come out. Also there is a benefit in using a smaller amount of water because it allows the flavors to be a little more clear.

Invader Zim

Thank you Bonnie and Ian for the clarification. The basket that you get the first time when you join steepster select is what I used and it fits the contours of my 5 oz cup perfectly, so no constricting of the tea. I definitely recommend steeping this one gaiwan style.

TeaBrat

I would definitely recommend gaiwans, they are great for pu-erhs and oolongs, in my opinion!

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Comments

CHAroma

Wow, I didn’t realize gaiwan style brewing could have such a different effect on the tea than western style. Maybe I should invest in a gaiwan…

Invader Zim

Honestly I wasn’t expecting a big difference either, it was hard to imagine that it was the exact same tea I had drank yesterday, more like a dumbed-down version and you don’t necessarily need a gaiwan. I wrote in the previous post how I do gaiwan style if you’re interested.

Azzrian

I wish I better understood how the gaiwan or gaiwan style makes a difference. The method that is. I need to wake up more and think this through.

Invader Zim

My best guess is that the brief steep times used gaiwan style keep the tea from basically stewing.

Bonnie

Also the water contact with the leaves and flowers, herbs etc. would be different. Some brew baskets are pretty constricting especially the mesh type. Good to test out methods! Bravo for that journey!

Ian

Usually in a gawain there is a higher leaf-to-water ratio and you use short steep times, which allows for different flavor profiles to come out. Also there is a benefit in using a smaller amount of water because it allows the flavors to be a little more clear.

Invader Zim

Thank you Bonnie and Ian for the clarification. The basket that you get the first time when you join steepster select is what I used and it fits the contours of my 5 oz cup perfectly, so no constricting of the tea. I definitely recommend steeping this one gaiwan style.

TeaBrat

I would definitely recommend gaiwans, they are great for pu-erhs and oolongs, in my opinion!

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Bio

I’m an avid tea drinker, it’s what I drink all day and why I’m here. I don’t sweeten my teas except for the occasional iced tea or cold-brewed tea. I typically brew my teas with a brew basket in a 12 oz cup. If I brew another way I will always note it.

Dislikes: black teas, milk flavored oolongs, hibiscus, red rooibos, licorice, dessert teas, mate, guayusa.

Loves: straight teas, especially Chinese green teas, sencha, jasmine, dan congs, mint, coconut.

My ratings are based mostly on the smiley faces. If a tea is of good quality but not to my taste preference I try not to rate it because I think that is unfair.

I drink a lot of the same teas and will not record every time I drink them. I log them the first time I try them and then again if I did something different and/or got different results.

I also try to keep my cupboard updated to what I actually have for those that wish to swap, although some of them are merely samples.

100 – http://steepster.com/teas/verdant-tea/32720-hand-rolled-top-grade-jasmine

Location

Pennsylvania

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