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drank Leaf Tea (Loose Leaf) by Typhoo
1624 tasting notes

A treat—-was able to pick up an experimental ounce bulk at my getting-better-all-the-time favorite little health food store. Looks just like PG tips—ground fine, but used in the same proportions, seems to be just a tetch lighter and brighter in flavor (not in appearance). Would have to do a side-by-side comparison to be sure, and tea geeky as I am, I’d love to do that, but time is going to be a tight commodity this week. (Sigh. Not a great thought for an early Monday morning.)

Michelle Butler Hallett

Oooh, Typhoo. Haven’t sipped that in years. Must keep my eye out for the loose version.

ashmanra

gmathis, I love you! You made my day by saying “tetch”. I haven’t heard that since my mom passed away. My oldest relatives used tetched, het, yonder, riled up, and such regularly! I know exactly how much is “a mess” of collards. Sigh. The Southern language is truly a child of Shakespeare, having descended nearly unchanged from Elizabethan English.

gmathis

Yep—a mess of spinach for salad, and it looks like it’s clabberin’ up to rain outside today. Just holler if you want to compare further Ozark/Southern Missouri vocabulary words… and if you haven’t read “Christy,” you need to, for the colloquialisms alone!

Michelle Butler Hallett

Souther US English bears some resemblance to Newfoundland English, which remained very much unchanged from the late 1600s to about mid-20th century. Back in university, I sounded out a phonetics-written speech from Shakespeare (Juliet, “What’s in a name?”)m the phonetics supposedly showing how Elizabethans pronounced the words. Know what I heard? A blend of Newfoundland and souther US accents.

I’m all for learning to read and write in Standard English, but the dialects are often much richer in vocab. Cuppa tay, now.

Michelle Butler Hallett

You might hear “tetch” here, too. More often pronoucned “titch.”

gmathis

In the book I’m going on and on about (set in Cutter Gap, Tennessee, circa 1912), one of the discoveries of the main character is the wealth of Scots-Irish heritage that’s been buried under years of neglect, including the ballads that hearken back to Bonnie Prince Charlie.

ashmanra

Since I was a musician and performer from age 7, many people thought I was British when I was growing up! I spoke like the people I listened to all the time – namely Rex Harrison and Christopher Plummer – my heroes! But I can do terrific impressions of several Southern accents and lapse into one when I speak to a real Southerner. The Southern Belle is the most fun. My elder sister actually speaks that way! She used to lean toward me when my parents best friends visited and whisper, “They don’t know better, they’re Yankees.”

Someone asked me once if we pronounced “aunt” as “awnt” or “ant.” The answer was….neither! If you are saying, “This is my aunt,” you pronounced it “ant.” But if you were calling your aunt by name, it was “aint!” I had an Aint Ethel, and Aint Inez, and Aint Neal….they would have died laughing if we had said “awnt” and would have accused us of putting on airs!

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Michelle Butler Hallett

Oooh, Typhoo. Haven’t sipped that in years. Must keep my eye out for the loose version.

ashmanra

gmathis, I love you! You made my day by saying “tetch”. I haven’t heard that since my mom passed away. My oldest relatives used tetched, het, yonder, riled up, and such regularly! I know exactly how much is “a mess” of collards. Sigh. The Southern language is truly a child of Shakespeare, having descended nearly unchanged from Elizabethan English.

gmathis

Yep—a mess of spinach for salad, and it looks like it’s clabberin’ up to rain outside today. Just holler if you want to compare further Ozark/Southern Missouri vocabulary words… and if you haven’t read “Christy,” you need to, for the colloquialisms alone!

Michelle Butler Hallett

Souther US English bears some resemblance to Newfoundland English, which remained very much unchanged from the late 1600s to about mid-20th century. Back in university, I sounded out a phonetics-written speech from Shakespeare (Juliet, “What’s in a name?”)m the phonetics supposedly showing how Elizabethans pronounced the words. Know what I heard? A blend of Newfoundland and souther US accents.

I’m all for learning to read and write in Standard English, but the dialects are often much richer in vocab. Cuppa tay, now.

Michelle Butler Hallett

You might hear “tetch” here, too. More often pronoucned “titch.”

gmathis

In the book I’m going on and on about (set in Cutter Gap, Tennessee, circa 1912), one of the discoveries of the main character is the wealth of Scots-Irish heritage that’s been buried under years of neglect, including the ballads that hearken back to Bonnie Prince Charlie.

ashmanra

Since I was a musician and performer from age 7, many people thought I was British when I was growing up! I spoke like the people I listened to all the time – namely Rex Harrison and Christopher Plummer – my heroes! But I can do terrific impressions of several Southern accents and lapse into one when I speak to a real Southerner. The Southern Belle is the most fun. My elder sister actually speaks that way! She used to lean toward me when my parents best friends visited and whisper, “They don’t know better, they’re Yankees.”

Someone asked me once if we pronounced “aunt” as “awnt” or “ant.” The answer was….neither! If you are saying, “This is my aunt,” you pronounced it “ant.” But if you were calling your aunt by name, it was “aint!” I had an Aint Ethel, and Aint Inez, and Aint Neal….they would have died laughing if we had said “awnt” and would have accused us of putting on airs!

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Somebody asked me once when I became a tea junkie; I think it dates back to college when I needed caffeine for a 7 a.m. class but chose not to do coffee. My favorite teapot is a medium-sized Brown Betty given to me by my Mema; the painted flowers are chipping off, but the size and feel is perfect. I rejoice when I get a morning to brew a pot of loose tea starting with a kettle; not a bag and a hot pot.

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Southwest Missouri

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