I’ve decided that, moving forward, I’m no longer going to put numeric ratings on my reviews.

a) Everyone has their own sliding scale that they then can’t really apply to someone else’s numbers
b) I don’t want to have to read everyone’s profile to know what the numbers mean
c) I don’t taste a lot of tea that I’m not highly confident is quality leaf and that I’ll enjoy drinking, which jams up my ratings almost all well above 75, most even above 85, which becomes fairly useless
d) On the rare occasion I get something I don’t like, that’s my personal taste, my preference, it is rarely a reflection on the quality of the tea, itself

So. No more numbers. Let’s talk about tea, and use words to “rate” the tea.

My recent experience with the golden fleece has me focusing on the non-flavor aspects of tea.

I’m on about my 10th steep of this first flush and the liqueur is still strong, mellow and soft with near instantaneous steeping.

The brew is thick and soft in the mouth, no bite on the tongue and no astringency at the finish. I’m sure I already knew this, unconsciously, but this fullness on the palate is a huge part of what makes me truly enjoy premium tea in a way that I don’t enjoy a bag of Lipton in a hotel room. It doesn’t really have anything to do with the Lipton “tasting bad”. With a splash of lemon or sugar Lipton is just fine. And you can’t really say that it is “thin” either. You can get a brew almost as black as coffee even with a cheap tea bag.

But what you can’t get is that full, thick mouth feel. It is what I think makes most people enjoy coffee but not enjoy tea if they’ve never had truly good tea. Bad tea is … for lack of a better word, watery.

Ten steeps in, this darjeeling starts to taste a whole lot like a peony white tea. Sunshine and hay and dusty old books. What’s interesting is just how different this is from a late season darjeeling which will be much more like an oolong or even an assam. But in this first flush there are no amber, toasted or black notes at all. There aren’t even really any green notes. This is really much more like a fine white tea than anything else.

Am I totally blanking or is the whole first flush, second flush, late flush thing not nearly as emphasized in any other tea beside darjeeling?

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec
ScottTeaMan

Sounds like a great tea! I have to agree about the distinct differences in the flushes of Darjeeling teas. That is one reason Darjeeling teas are such a favorite of mine. It’s like there’s almost always a surprise in the cup-or surprises. :))

Jim Marks

I am now remembering there is some Chinese tea that separates into pickings prior to and after the celebration of some festival, but I cannot remember the name of the tea variety or the festival…

ScottTeaMan

Pre-chingming teas. This is from Upton Tea Imports:

The festival of Chingming (Qingming) is a 2500 year-old tradition in which people visit the burial sites of their ancestors to pay respect. It is significant in Chinese tea culture because it serves as a demarcation between a distinct pre-Chingming plucking period and the subsequent plucking period occuring after the festival date (usually around April 5). Pre-Chingming teas are prized for their delicacy and subtle, fresh nuances.

ScottTeaMan

In 2009, Upton’s procured some Tindharia Autumnal “Diwali” tea, to honor and celebrate the Festival of Lights. Here’s more info on Diwali:

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/diwali/eventcoverage/10244929.cms

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ScottTeaMan

Sounds like a great tea! I have to agree about the distinct differences in the flushes of Darjeeling teas. That is one reason Darjeeling teas are such a favorite of mine. It’s like there’s almost always a surprise in the cup-or surprises. :))

Jim Marks

I am now remembering there is some Chinese tea that separates into pickings prior to and after the celebration of some festival, but I cannot remember the name of the tea variety or the festival…

ScottTeaMan

Pre-chingming teas. This is from Upton Tea Imports:

The festival of Chingming (Qingming) is a 2500 year-old tradition in which people visit the burial sites of their ancestors to pay respect. It is significant in Chinese tea culture because it serves as a demarcation between a distinct pre-Chingming plucking period and the subsequent plucking period occuring after the festival date (usually around April 5). Pre-Chingming teas are prized for their delicacy and subtle, fresh nuances.

ScottTeaMan

In 2009, Upton’s procured some Tindharia Autumnal “Diwali” tea, to honor and celebrate the Festival of Lights. Here’s more info on Diwali:

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/diwali/eventcoverage/10244929.cms

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I am rarely, if ever, active here. But I do return from time to time to talk about a very special tea I’ve come across.

You can hear the music I compose here:
http://jimjohnmarks.bandcamp.com

I have a chapter in this book of popular philosophy
http://amzn.com/0812697316

I blog about cooking here https://dungeonsandkitchens.wordpress.com

I blog about composing music and gardening here
http://jimjohnmarks.wordpress.com

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