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93
drank Songyang White by Verdant Tea
32 tasting notes

Bah! What is it with my steeping, lately?!

I followed the website instructions for western steeping, a tablespoon per cup at 175F for 1.5-2 minutes, but that’s a bit long I think. Came out a bit bitter. It’s not too bad, I can tell there’s a great amount of beauty under there, but still disappointing. Can’t wait for my new teaware to get here! I’ll gaiwan it up and fiddle until the tea suits my palate.

That said, did anyone else pick the slightest hint of chocolate in the dry leaf smell? It’s gone after brewing, the only scent I could get then was a very fragrant edamame. I’m having trouble describing the liquor, actually. It’s edamame but without grossing me out, so there’s definitely more at play. And from what I could tell under the bitter tang, it tasted like a smooth, delicately buttery vegetable.

I can tell I will like this. Just I need to find how to do it! Will rate this at a later date.

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 1 min, 30 sec
David Duckler

Hi, I am glad that you are seeing some of the intruguing notes behind the bitterness. My apologies. I had just edited steeping instructions on this tea and must have put in TB by force of habit. Most teas do benefit from more leaf. This one, I think just a teaspoon would do the trick.

The other thing to try if you are up for it is Jingshan style steeping. Use 175 degree water, and a clear (tempered) glass cup if you are feeling adventurous. Sprinkle the teaspoon of leaves on top of the water after letting it steam for 10-20 seconds. Swirl the leaves around a bit and start sipping after maybe 20 seconds of steeping. If you have a brew basket, you can use it, and apply the same principle of sprinkling the leaves, but have control and remove them after about 40 seconds to a minute. That woudl probably be ideal.

Sorry about the brewing instructions, and thanks for the persistance with this one. It is truly rewarding when you get it just right. I couldn’t believe that it was white tea when my friend Weiwei first sent it over after finding it in her travels. Simply too intriguing to resist offering, even if it is only on a seasonal basis.

Best of luck with your next brewing attempt. Have fun!

smartkitty

Thanks for the tips! I tried doing it Jingshan style, and it came out much better than my first attempt. Still not quite right, but I need to perfect my technique. I burned myself in the process, got distracted, and oversteeped it by about twenty seconds. Still a lot better than my first attempt, and I noted a whole lot more buttery deliciousness. Awesome tea!

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Comments

David Duckler

Hi, I am glad that you are seeing some of the intruguing notes behind the bitterness. My apologies. I had just edited steeping instructions on this tea and must have put in TB by force of habit. Most teas do benefit from more leaf. This one, I think just a teaspoon would do the trick.

The other thing to try if you are up for it is Jingshan style steeping. Use 175 degree water, and a clear (tempered) glass cup if you are feeling adventurous. Sprinkle the teaspoon of leaves on top of the water after letting it steam for 10-20 seconds. Swirl the leaves around a bit and start sipping after maybe 20 seconds of steeping. If you have a brew basket, you can use it, and apply the same principle of sprinkling the leaves, but have control and remove them after about 40 seconds to a minute. That woudl probably be ideal.

Sorry about the brewing instructions, and thanks for the persistance with this one. It is truly rewarding when you get it just right. I couldn’t believe that it was white tea when my friend Weiwei first sent it over after finding it in her travels. Simply too intriguing to resist offering, even if it is only on a seasonal basis.

Best of luck with your next brewing attempt. Have fun!

smartkitty

Thanks for the tips! I tried doing it Jingshan style, and it came out much better than my first attempt. Still not quite right, but I need to perfect my technique. I burned myself in the process, got distracted, and oversteeped it by about twenty seconds. Still a lot better than my first attempt, and I noted a whole lot more buttery deliciousness. Awesome tea!

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

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Bio

Bibliophile and language junkie. Now decidedly tea-crazed. Trying to convince The Boy that tea tastes like more than just hot water. Cat-lady and rat-lady in the making.

From San Juan, Puerto Rico. Adopted Bostonian. Current long-time Chicagoan. Up, up, up the ziggurat. Lickety-split!

I like an interesting tea, so I’m expanding my tea stash daily. As well as my teaware collection.

Location

Chicago

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