92

All right, first sample from the new batch from Teavivre. Thanks again, Angel!

This is also my first Dragonwell, so I’m a bit excited to finally get to try it out. I put about four grams of tea in my tea ball. The instructions said to use more, but that was also to make 8 oz. of tea, whereas my mug only holds 6. Anyway, I steeped the leaves for one minute in 175 degree water, and the results were great. It has a very smooth texture, like the aftertaste of a Wuyi Oolong, which seems to coat the tongue and hard palate. The tea also has a delightfully nutty flavor which reminds me a bit of Hojicha, but it’s not as strong and taste more refined. Definitely a great way to start off the weekend.

Alright, second infusion, same preparation as before. The only real difference is that it has lost a bit of the mineral smoothness, which, while disappointing, does not really affect the taste too much. It is, however, a bit unfortunate, because it seems that I won’t get all that many infusions out of this tea.

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C
Jim Marks

dragon well is roasted very early during processing and that is what brings the oolong or hojicha type flavor along. I find that really excellent dragon well leaf is the closest chinese style green to the japanese style green — which is odd because the processing is so radically different, but the flavors end up a log more the same.

Joshua Smith

I agree completely. It’s not exactly the same, but it’s closer to Sencha than other Chinese greens, especially how it looks. It is certainly a very interesting experience.

unfeasible

That is exactly what I thought of this dragonwell too! Interesting how that happens.

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Jim Marks

dragon well is roasted very early during processing and that is what brings the oolong or hojicha type flavor along. I find that really excellent dragon well leaf is the closest chinese style green to the japanese style green — which is odd because the processing is so radically different, but the flavors end up a log more the same.

Joshua Smith

I agree completely. It’s not exactly the same, but it’s closer to Sencha than other Chinese greens, especially how it looks. It is certainly a very interesting experience.

unfeasible

That is exactly what I thought of this dragonwell too! Interesting how that happens.

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Bio

I am a university student, studying Computer Science, who found that I really enjoy a nice cup of tea. I finally got into loose-leaf tea in August of 2011. I am currently in the process of expanding my horizons, and have found that I have a particular fondness for Oolongs in general, and Wuyi Yanchas in particular. The unique mineral taste is very appealing to me, as well as a nice Sencha. More recently, I’ve developed a taste for Sheng puerh, white tea, and black teas. The only things I’ve tried that I didn’t like was Shu puerh, but that might have been because it was quite young. Regardless, I’ve been slowly expanding my horizons, so if you have any recommendations, please feel free to send me a PM.

Just for the heck of it, my other interests include classical musics (Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Verdi, Debussy, Shostakovitch, Rachmaninoff, Liszt, and Wagner, to name a few composers). I also have a fondness for a bit more modern music, like The Beatles, all Jazz (by all, I really do mean all), Gorillaz (I love Demon Days), and a couple of Indie artists you will never run across unless you play a lot of semi obscure Indie games. Also, I love cats.

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Fairfax, VA

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